Apr 13, 2024  
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Courses


 
  
  • JOUR 486 - Interviewing


    Principles and techniques of various forms of interviewing, featuring in-class laboratory activities. Emphasis on the informational interview.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Admitted to the major, junior or senior standing.
  
  • JOUR 490 - Selected Topics


    Study of a specific topic related to mass communication.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Admitted to the major, junior or senior standing.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • JOUR 493 - Independent Studies


    Supervised study and practical experience in subjects and projects to be determined in consultation with a Journalism and Media Studies faculty member. Students wishing to register for this course must consult with the faculty member prior to registration.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Admitted to the major, junior or senior standing.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • JOUR 499 - Professional Internship


    Introduces students to language not just as a means of conveying information, but also as a way for individuals and groups express identity and their place in society. Examines how language use shapes worldviews cross-culturally as well as how these worldviews shape language use. Study that language interacts with the social world interact in many ways including through gender, age, and class/caste across diverse cultures.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Fully-admitted major, junior or senior standing, written consent of instructor and internship coordinator, appropriate previous course work, and 3.00 GPA.
    Internships may be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • JPN 113 - Elementary Japanese I


    Development of language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; structural analysis. Emphasis placed on speaking.

    Credits 3
    Notes See department for placement.
  
  • JPN 114 - Elementary Japanese II


    Development of language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; structural analysis. Emphasis placed on speaking.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
    Notes See department for placement.
  
  • JPN 213 - Intermediate Japanese I


    Structural review, conversation, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent achievement on the placement test.
  
  • JPN 214 - Intermediate Japanese II


    Structural review, conversation, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or eqivalent.
  
  • JPN 301 - Third-Year Japanese I


    Development of speaking and listening skills. Authentic texts introduced with the aim of achieving basic literacy in modern written Japanese.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent achievement on the placement test.
  
  • JPN 302 - Third-Year Japanese II


    Development of speaking and listening skills. In addition, authentic texts introduced with the aim of achieving basic literacy in modern written Japanese.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent achievement on the placement test.
  
  • JPN 401 - Advanced Japanese Composition I


    Composition course designed to improve writing skills for students at the senior level with an emphasis on stylistics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Taught in Japanese.
  
  • JPN 416 - Japanese for Business I


    Study of vocabulary and culture knowledge required in Japanese-speaking business setting. Includes a review of grammar, reading, and writing exercise to develop fluency in business-related communicative situations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Taught in Japanese.
  
  • JPN 417 - Japanese for Business II


    Designed for students who have completed   and wish to familiarize themselves with common rules as well as practices of Japanese in business setting and to acquire further ready-to-use communicative skills in business Japanese at various levels of formality.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Taught in Japanese.
  
  • JPN 425 - Topics in Japanese Culture


    For students who have completed JPN 302 and who wish to broaden their knowledge of the Japanese language, society and culture.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Taught in Japanese.
  
  • KIN 172 - Foundations of Kinesiology


    Examines and explores the field of kinesiology, as the academic study of human movement. Presents the knowledge of kinesiology as a comprehensive, cross-disciplinary synthesis of various academic approaches from a variety of subdisciplines.

    Credits 3
  
  • KIN 175 - Physical Activity and Health


    Basic understanding of elementary exercise physiology as it applies to exercise and physical fitness. Principles of good nutrition and caloric values of common foods. Energy equation and factors in weight gain and weight loss. Practical assessment of fitness and body composition.

    Credits 3
  
  • KIN 191 - Exercise for the Overweight or Type II Diabetic


    Development and implementation of physical fitness and weight control for the obese and/or Type II diabetic. Instruction on proper exercise techniques combined with regular fitness training classes to improve overall cardiovascular endurance, strength, body composition, and flexibility. All participants undergo a pre- and post-physical fitness assessment to monitor conditioning status. (Available for a letter grade option only once.)

    Credits 1
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • KIN 242 - Theory of Pool/Spa Operation


    (Same as RLS 242.) Prepares health, physical education, and recreation professionals, and hotel management personnel with the necessary fundamentals of pool/spa operation relative to a healthful and safe environment.

    Credits 2
  
  • KIN 245 - Anatomical Kinesiology


    Anatomical analysis of human movement as a basis for teaching and adaptation of motor skills.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites BIOL 189.
  
  • KIN 250 - Social Psychology of Physical Activity


    Introduction to current theories, research methodology, and practical concerns relating to the sociological/psychological perspectives of sport and physical activity.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites SOC 101 or PSY 101.
  
  • KIN 300 - Statistics for the Health Sciences


    Introduction to quantitative methods in the analysis and interpretation of data from research in the health and human movement sciences. Emphasis on conceptual understanding, appropriate application of tests, and interpretation of results.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites MATH 120 or higher.
  
  • KIN 308 - Scientific Basis of Strength Development


    For individuals interested in the design and assessment of strength and resistance training programs. Topics include: scientific and theoretical basis of strength; different types and systems of training; different types of equipment; designing training programs; myths and fallacies; and detraining.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites KIN 245,
  
  • KIN 309 - Advanced Personal Training


    Examination of the personal fitness training profession. Emphasis on developing skills for client education and motivation, and establishing criteria for designing and implementing personalized training programs for clients.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites KIN 175.
  
  • KIN 310 - Advanced Strength Methods


    Theory and principles of resistance exercise programs. Emphasis on mechanism of adaptation to resistance exercise; design and implementation of strength training programs for enhancement of athletic performance; and role of strength training in improving general health and fitness.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites KIN 308.
  
  • KIN 312 - Motor Control and Learning


    Introduction to motor performance and learning, including biological foundations of motor control, information processing, learning theories, instructional and training procedures to enhance learning.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PSY 101.
  
  • KIN 316 - Motor Development Across the Lifespan


    Examination of motor and cognitive development throughout the lifespan. Special emphasis on skilled performance, learning theories, motor abilities, individual differences, developmental considerations, and instructional and training procedures for infants through older adulthood.

    Credits 3
  
  • KIN 346 - Biomechanics


    Mechanical analysis of internal and external forces acting on the human body and the effects of those forces. Special emphasis on teaching motor skills in a physical education and athletic setting. Laboratory experience to enhance learning.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites KIN 245; MATH 124.
  
  • KIN 401 - History of Exercise and Sport Science


    Historical concepts, systems, patterns, and traditions that have influenced American physical activity and sport, with emphasis on the evolution of kinesiology within the discipline of exercise and sport science.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites KIN 172.
  
  • KIN 414 - Enhancing Mental and Motor Abilities


    Topics of mental and motor abilities including attention, arousal states, information processing, and practice schedules. Special emphasis on enhancing motor performance through mental strategies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites KIN 250, KIN 312, or KIN 316.
  
  • KIN 415 - Forensic Kinesiology


    Survey of forensic investigation. Focus on personal injury and accident avoidance from an interdisciplinary perspective. Emphasis on humans and their interactions in the physical environment.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites KIN 245.
  
  • KIN 424 - Professional Development in Kinesiological Sciences


    The course applies principles of cognitive neuroscience and psychomotor kinesiology to develop skills in professional communication and leadership as related to fields of Kinesiology. Topics include team cohesion, effective group and individual communication, strategies for professional goal setting, interview skills, networking, leading and managing self and organizations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  , junior standing.
  
  • KIN 440 - Human Physiology


    (Same as BIOL 440.) Principles of human physiology, normal functioning of human body as a whole, and interrelationships of organs and organ systems. Emphasis on physiological processes and their interrelationships.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites BIOL 189.
  
  • KIN 446 - Sport and Exercise Biomechanics


    Mechanics applied to the analysis of human movement in sport and exercise activities. Emphasis on developing both qualitative and quantitative skills to assess and improve performance.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • KIN 456 - Biomechanics of Endurance Performance


    The primary objective of this course is to provide a study of endurance performance from a biomechanical perspective. At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to apply biomechanical terminology to understand factors that influence endurance swimming, biking, and running performance.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • KIN 461 - Physical Activity in Aging


    Introductory course in adult fitness and maintenance. Objectives and components of physical fitness analyzed to meet the needs and capabilities of the older population. Specific programs of exercise and related physical activities explored.

    Credits 3
  
  • KIN 462 - Adult Development in Aging


    Physical and psychophysiologic developmental patterns in adulthood and normal aging explored. Relationships of the physical and socio-environmental interactions to the adult physical life process with considerations to successful aging within life stages reviewed.

    Credits 3
  
  • KIN 475 - Seminar in Sport and Fitness Management


    Bridges the professional sequence and the clinical experience of students enrolled in supervised on-site professional experiences.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites Concurrent enrollment in KIN 490 and consent of instructor.
  
  • KIN 485 - Physical Activity and the Law


    Legal principles associated with physical activity professions. Emphasis on practical application of legal issues in risk management, safety procedures, negligence, liability, contracts, and professional ethics, as well as recognition and minimization of legal risk during physical activity.

    Credits 3
  
  • KIN 490 - Internship in Fitness and Sport Management


    Supervised on-site professional experience in local settings that encompass all age groups including health clubs, YMCAs, industry, nursing homes, and senior activity centers.

    Credits (1-12)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor and upper division standing.
  
  • KIN 491 - Exercise Physiology


    Physiological changes in human organisms during physical exercise; physiological bases for planning physical education programs; observations of respiratory, circulatory, nervous, and metabolic adjustments to physical exercise. Laboratory experience to enhance learning.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites BIOL 224.
  
  • KIN 492 - Clinical Exercise Physiology


    Pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease; role of exercise in treatment and prevention of coronary heart disease; exercise stress testing principles and procedures; prescribing exercise programs for healthy adults and patient populations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites BIOL 224.
  
  • KIN 499 - Specialized Problems in Kinesiology


    Specialized instruction and/or research designed to develop in-depth understanding of a current physical education problem.

    Credits (1-6)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • LAND 100 - Introduction to Landscape Architecture


    Survey of landscape architecture. Includes historical examples and the theoretical, social, technical, and environmental forces that shape this profession. Especially for majors and non-majors who wish to explore this field as a career choice.

    Credits 3
    Notes (Same as AAE 100 and AAI 100.)
  
  • LAND 180 - Fundamentals of landscape architectural design I


    Introduction to the principles and theories of design and design methodology in the “making” and representations of form and space. Focus on two dimensional representation.

    Credits 3
  
  • LAND 241 - Grading and Drainage (Construction I)


    Formerly Listed as AAL 341.

    Basic skills in hard and soft surface site grading techniques and sizing of drainage structures and pipes.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and   or  .
  
  • LAND 242 - Irrigation (Construction II)


    Formerly Listed as AAL 342.

    Introduces basic design of irrigation, construction and maintenance of irrigation. Sizing of components calculated and available products introduced.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Landscape major and   and   or  .
  
  • LAND 255 - History of Landscape Architecture


    Formerly Listed as AAL 355.

    The history of designed landscapes from ancient times to today. Environmental, social and cultural factors which influence human made landscapes.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • LAND 257 - Plant Materials


    Natural components of landscape design: characteristics, applications, selection and use.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
    Notes Field trips.
  
  • LAND 258 - Xeric Plant Materials


    Identification, distribution, growth, characteristics, adaptation, and usage of xeric plants. Emphasizes bedding plants, shrubs and trees.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • LAND 262 - CAD for Landscape Architecture


    Beginning application of computer-aided design software, particularly AutoCAD, focusing on the needs of the landscape architect. Two-dimensional CAD drawing tools and techniques, complex object creation, information management, and common situations encountered in a professional environment explored. Other CAD software and three-dimensional design techniques also explored.

    Credits 3
  
  • LAND 284 - Landscape Architecture Design I


    Formerly Listed as AAL 284.

    Introduction to the elements, principles and theories of landscape design. Emphasis on design process and environmental determinants.

    Credits 6
    Prerequisites AAD 182.
  
  • LAND 286 - Landscape Architecture Design II


    Formerly Listed as AAL 286.

    Elements, principles and theories of landscape design with emphasis on site planning.

    Credits 6
    Prerequisites  
  
  • LAND 306 - Charrette


    A collaborative experience where students work intensively during a short period of time with a local community to solve their problems by generating and presenting multiple design solutions.

    Credits 1-3
    Prerequisites AAL 284 and AAL 286.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • LAND 384 - Landscape Architecture Design III


    Formerly Listed as AAL 384.

    Landscape architectural design/build applications with emphasis on construction detailing and construction at the site scale.

    Credits 6
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites   and admission to upper division of major.
  
  • LAND 386 - Landscape Architecture Design IV


    Landscape architectural design applications of large-scale site analysis, land use planning, and ecosystem management issued.

    Credits 6
    Prerequisites AAL 384.
  
  • LAND 442 - Landscape Architecture Structures


    Formerly Listed as AAL 442.

    Basic design of landscape architectural structure systems, sizing of components, availability of products, and typical construction document formats.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites   and   or  .
  
  • LAND 443 - Stormwater Management (Construction IV)


    Lecture course addressing the design and calculations of stormwater management systems, best management practices, surface and subsurface drainage systems, basic hydrology, horizontal and vertical layout, specifications of planting plans, demolition and tree preservation plans, specifications, and erosion and sediment control design and practices.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • LAND 455 - Landscape Interpretation


    Formerly Listed as AAL 455.

    Investigates the vernacular landscape evolving from decisions made in manipulating physical and social environments. Examines various landscape types, including agricultural, residential, strip development, landfill, industrial, transportation corridors, landmarks, and centers. Emphasizes wayfinding, implied symbolism, and meaning in the landscape.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  
  
  • LAND 484 - Landscape Architecture Design V


    Formerly Listed as AAL 484.

    Landscape architectural design applications in community and neighborhood context.

    Credits 6
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • LAND 486 - Landscape Architecture Design VI


    Formerly Listed as AAL 486.

    Urban design application of landscape architecture exploring suburban, urban, and mixed use models.

    Credits 6
    Prerequisites  
  
  • LAND 491 - Professional Practice


    Formerly Listed as AAL 491.

    Issues of professional practice, including legal requirements, ethics, management structures, malpractice claims, value engineering, contracts, and the professional job market.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Senior standing.
  
  • LAND 493 - Independent Study


    Formerly Listed as AAL 493.

    Independent study of a selected landscape architecture topic.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • LAND 495 - Special Topics in Landscape Architecture


    Formerly Listed as AAL 495.

    Experimental and other topics which may be of current interest in landscape architecture.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits.
    Notes Topics and credits to be announced.
  
  • LAND 499 - Sustainable Design for the 21st Century City


    An integrative approach to human and natural systems in urban areas. Ecological principles, sustainable design, and human-ecosystem interaction will be examined at a variety of scales. Sustainable design concepts will be linked to design and planning principles.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Senior standing.
  
  • LAS 100 - Introduction to Latina/o Studies


    This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Latina/o Studies through the fields of history, sociology, political science, literature and education. Students will use multidisciplinary approaches to this field of study and intergrate the various fields to understand the complexity of researching this dynamic population.

    Credits 3
  
  • LAS 101 - Introduction to Latin American Studies


    Interdisciplinary introduction to the culture, history, and political economy of contemporary Latin America. Examines the history of colonialism and independence, values and social structures, political institutions, and economic relations in ‘the region.

    Credits 3
  
  • LAS 499 - Latin American Studies: Independent Study


    Program of independent reading and research, to be selected in consultation with an instructor before registration, and with the approval of the Latin American Studies Program Chair.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ; and approval of Chair of LAS Program Committee.
  
  • LAT 113 - Elementary Latin I


    First-year Latin grammar, reading, and vocabulary building.

    Credits 3
    Notes See department for placement.
  
  • LAT 114 - Elementary Latin II


    First-year Latin grammar, reading, and vocabulary building.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
    Notes See department for placement.
  
  • LAT 213 - Intermediate Latin I


    Intermediate Latin grammar, reading, and vocabulary expansion.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • LAT 214 - Intermediate Latin II


    Intermediate Latin grammar, reading, and vocabulary expansion.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • LAT 331 - Latin Literature in Translation


    Selected masterpieces of Latin literature in English translation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Nine credits of English composition and literature.
  
  • LIN 101 - Language and Conceptualization


    Study of natural and artificial languages as expressions of cognition and culture. Topics include language structure and origins, cognitive models, categorization, schemas, thinking for speaking, spatial language, parallel processing, language modules, and neural networks. Students analyze samples of natural language and reconstruct their underlying cognitive models.

    Credits 3
  
  • MATH 95 - Elementary Algebra


    Elementary algebraic topics for students whose mathematical background or placement score indicates that preparation for Intermediate Algebra is desirable. Credit for this course does not count toward the total needed for graduation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Arithmetic skills required.
  
  • MATH 96 - Intermediate Algebra


    Polynomial and rational expressions, linear equations, linear and absolute value inequalities, applications, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, relations, and their graphs, systems of equations. Credit for this course does not count toward the total needed for graduation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Three years of high school mathematics, including one year of algebra, and a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test.)
  
  • MATH 115 - Humane Mathematics


    Study of some elementary and elegant examples displaying mathematics as a medium for artistic expression and aesthetic appreciation. Intended for students with limited mathematical background, but not preparation for college algebra or the precalculus mathematics sequence. Does not satisfy the general education core mathematics requirement.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites One year of high school algebra and a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test).
  
  • MATH 120 - Fundamentals of College Mathematics


    Real numbers; consumer mathematics; variation; functions, relations, and graphs; geometry of measurement; probability and statistics; sets and logic. Broad in scope course, emphasizes applications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Three years of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above and a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test), or   or equivalent.
  
  • MATH 121 - Mathematical Topics and Applications Provided in a Real World Context


    Introduction to mathematical concepts such as: logic and analytic thinking, related rates, functions and relations, graphs and representations, properties of numbers, set theory, and consumer mathematics. Students will be exposed to topics within the context of practical applications. Technology will be incorporated.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Approval of Department Chair.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • MATH 122 - Number Concepts for Elementary School Teachers


    Mathematics needed by those teaching the new-content curriculum at the elementary school level, emphasis on number concepts. MATH 122 does not satisfy the general education core mathematics requirement.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test).
  
  • MATH 123 - Statistical and Geometrical Concepts for Elementary School Teachers


    Mathematics needed by those teaching the new-content curriculum at the elementary school level, emphasizing concepts in statistics and geometry.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • MATH 124 - College Algebra


    Equations and inequalities; relations and functions; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithm functions; systems of linear equations and inequalities; matrices; sequences and series; binomial theorem.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Three years of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above, and a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test) or   or equivalent.
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 124 and MATH 126 or 128.
  
  • MATH 126 - Precalculus I


    Topics include fundamentals of algebra, functions and graphs, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and systems of linear equations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Three years of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above and a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test) or   or equivalent.
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 126 and MATH 124 or 128.
  
  • MATH 127 - Precalculus II


    Topics include circular functions, trigonometric identities and equations, conic sections, complex numbers, and discrete algebra.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Three years of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above, and a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test) or   or equivalent.
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 127 and MATH 128.
  
  • MATH 128 - Precalculus and Trigonometry


    Relations, functions, and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithm, and trigonometric functions; analytic trigonometry; systems of equations and inequalities; conics; mathematical induction; sequences and series. A combination of MATH 126 and MATH 127.

    Credits 5
    Prerequisites Four years of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above, and a satisfactory score on a placement exam (ACT, SAT, or Math Placement Test) or   or equivalent.
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 128 and MATH 124, 126, or 127.
  
  • MATH 132 - Finite Mathematics


    Logic, sets, probability, matrices, and linear programming, and their application to the analysis of business and social science problems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or equivalent.
  
  • MATH 170 - Mathematics of Finance


    Mathematical study of interest, annuities, sinking funds, depreciation, amortization, and other topics related to business problems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • MATH 176 - Introductory Calculus for Business and Social Sciences


    Techniques of calculus, with applications to the analysis of business and social science problems. Topics include functions of one and several variables, differentiation and partial differentiation, integration, and optimization.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or equivalent.
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 176 and 181.
  
  • MATH 181 - Calculus I


    Differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions, with applications.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 176 and 181.
  
  • MATH 182 - Calculus II


    Further applications and techniques of integration including integration by parts, sequences and series, polynomial approximations.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • MATH 213 - Introduction to Problem Solving Techniques


    Analyzing and solving standard and non-standard problems using a variety of different problem-solving techniques, tools, and technology. Emphasizes different approaches to solving problems and complete oral and/or written explanations of how to solve the problems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • MATH 214 - Geometry for Middle School Teachers


    Study of one- two- and three-dimensional geometry, including figures, properties, and transformations, using classical and analytical methods. Emphasis on developing an appreciation for the widespread use of geometry and using geometry to solve problems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • MATH 251 - Discrete Mathematics I


    Topics include set operations, Cartesian product relations and functions, equivalence relation, graphs and digraphs, propositional calculus, truth tables, mathematical induction, elementary combinatorics with applications to probability.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
  
  • MATH 271 - Elementary Probability


    Review of sets, counting, finite and countable probability spaces, random variables and distribution functions, statistical quantities, limit theorems, applications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  
  
  • MATH 283 - Calculus III


    Vectors; differentiation and integration of vector valued functions; multivariable calculus; partial derivatives; multiple integrals and applications; line, surface and volume integrals; Green’s theorem; divergence theorem; and Stoke’s theorem.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • MATH 313 - Probability and Combinatorics for Teachers


    Topics include sets, functions, relations, propositional logic, induction, elementary combinatorics, and elementary graph theory.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   and  .
  
  • MATH 314 - History of Mathematics


    Evolution of mathematics from ancient numeral systems to twentieth-century mathematics. Effects of culture on mathematics and impact of mathematics on cultures also considered.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or  .
  
  • MATH 320 - Mathematics of Interest


    Introduction to the mathematical theory underlying the measurement of interest, accumulated and present values, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bonds, and securities.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites    or  .
  
  • MATH 330 - Linear Algebra


    Introduction to linear algebra, including matrices and linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 330 and 365.
  
  • MATH 351 - Discrete Mathematics II


    Infinite sets, Cantor’s diagonal argument, first order logic, formal and informal proofs, combinatorics, Boolean algebra, lattices, and graphs.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • MATH 360 - Introduction to Biomathematics I


    Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of biomathematics; mathematical models of biological systems; applied numerical methods and computer software for solving mathematical models.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
    Notes Duplicate credits cannot be earned for MATH 360 and BIOL 360.
 

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