Apr 20, 2024  
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Courses


 
  
  • FREN 425 - Topics in French Culture


    Analysis of different aspects of French or Francophone culture through art, mass media and popular traditions.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or  .
    May be repeated with a different topic for up to six credits
    Notes Taught in French.
  
  • FREN 441 - Topics in French Literature


    Concentrated study of selected themes, authors, periods or literary forms in French or Francophone literature.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
    May be repeated for a maximum of six credits with a different topic.
  
  • FREN 443 - From French Literature to Film


    (Same as  .) From a condensed analysis of narrative techniques and structure of original literary sources toward a detailed study of the basic problems connected with the grammar of film. Students expected to read the original literary work in translation and/or script if available.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or  .
  
  • FREN 449 - The History of French Film


    Survey and evolution of French film from silent to sound: surrealism, realism, and the New Wave. Includes the work of major filmmakers such as Clair, Renoir, Cocteau, Clouzot, Godard, Truffaut, etc. Films analyzed as works of art, social documents, and instruments of communication.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or  .
  
  • FREN 487 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture IV


    Senior-level course work in French language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites FREN 301.
    May be repeated to a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • GAM 225 - Introduction to Gaming Management


    Overview of the casino; topics include the economics of the casino, its interface with the hotel, organizations, and terminology.

    Credits 3
  
  • GAM 334 - Gaming Management I


    Review of gaming industry history as it applies to modern management philosophy and regulation. Examination of hotel casino cash flow sources, mechanics of production, slot operations analysis, game analysis, casino marketing analysis, problem gambling, and a general overview of of casino management. Basic statistical applications related to casino management.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • GAM 339 - Protection of Casino Table Games


    In-depth examination of the various methods used to protect casino table games. Reviews blackjack, baccarat, poker, craps, and roulette, examining possible ways that cheating can occur. Methods of detection and various internal controls used by the casino discussed.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GAM 340 - Gaming Device Management


    Study of casino slot management and route operation management procedures, with emphasis on equipment technology and maintenance (ticket/in-ticket/out, server based gaming, tracking systems, Title 31, hand-held gaming devices, and electronic games), controls, layout, and customer service. Includes history of equipment development, future outlook, and career opportunities.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • GAM 342 - Problem Gambling


    Learn about the widespread popularity of gambling behavior and the dynamics of the legal, moral, and medical aspects of “deviant” acts. Interprets problem gambling from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Future challenges faced by problem gamblers and the gaming industry.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GAM 426 - Accounting for the Gaming Industry


    Detailed examination of accounting systems, procedure, and controls peculiar to casinos required by both management and government for internal auditing, financial reporting, and governmental control.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GAM 434 - Gaming Management II


    Second course in casino management and operations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GAM 437 - Casino Industry Regulation


    Nevada’s system of gaming regulation and control provides a model for studying the history, purpose, politics, methods, and limitations — both practical and legal — of governmental regulation and control of what is now an international gaming industry. Security, surveillance, government policy, and technical and casino operational guidelines will be addressed.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • GAM 439 - Seminar in Casino Management


    Special topics in casino problems. Course open to experienced casino personnel.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GAM 440 - Casino Marketing


    Common/popular casino marketing tactics are examined, followed by an overview of slot club structures and related database marketing activities. Match-play coupons, dead chip (a.k.a. rolling programs), and loss discounting are all closely examined. Casino hosting, the role of nongaming amenities, and repeater-market gaming promotions are also covered.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • GAM 442 - Sociology of Gambling


    Analysis of patterns of participation in various forms of gambling; political/economic background of gambling; effects of gambling on communities, lifestyles, and value systems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or   or  .
    Notes Same as  .
  
  • GAM 470 - Quantitative Methods and Applications in Casino Gaming


    Develops the techniques and methods for computing the probabilities, expected values, and house percentages of casino games and analyzes the effects of changes in playing rules and payoff odds.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites ECON 261 or STAT 161.
  
  • GAM 474 - Independent Study in Gaming Management


    Research in an area of concern to the management of gaming operations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  , senior standing, good academic standing, and graduation application on file.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • GAM 490 - Internship in Gaming Operations


    A field-based experience for students to focus on a possible career path. Designed to expand knowledge of the gaming industry by rotating through various casino departments; focus on specific areas in casino operations such as marketing, table games, cage, slots, audit; regulatory/legal entities, gaming device manufacturing companies, etc.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   , senior standing, good academic standing, and graduation application on file.
  
  • GAM 495 - Special Topics in Gaming Operations


    Series of special courses designed by faculty from academe and industry. Topics cover a wide spectrum of current gaming issues.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  , sophomore, junior or senior standing.
    May be repeated up to a maximum of six credits; nine on petition.
  
  • GEOG 103 - Physical Geography of Earth’s Environment


    Formerly Listed as GEOG 101.

    Introduction to the processes that influence weather, rivers, oceans, climate, deserts, glaciers and their associated ecosystems. Emphasizes relationships between humans and our environment.

    Credits 3
    Notes Satisfies the General Education Core requirement for a science course. Lecture may be combined with optional lab  , which satisfies General Education Core requirement for a laboratory science course.
  
  • GEOG 104 - Physical Geography Laboratory


    Provides an opportunity to apply concepts in physical geography, including map interpretation, computer GIS, meteorological processes, development of landforms and an understanding of the dynamics of the earth.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • GEOG 116 - Introduction to Oceanography


    Fundamentals of oceanography will be covered including a brief history followed by the spatial aspects of geological, physical, chemical and biological oceanography. An emphasis will be placed on the role of oceans on climate change in the past, present and future, including global warming.

    Credits 3
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hour lecture.
  
  • GEOG 140 - Conversations With Earth


    Discussion of current topics on Earth’s origin, evolution, and habitability. Topics include: radioactive waste storage, catastrophic floods, evolution and extinction on life, climate change, global warming, volcanism, mountain building, ice ages, Nevada geology, ore deposits, and groundwater, among others.

    Credits 3
    Notes (Same as  .)
  
  • GEOG 421 - Climatology


    Formerly Listed as GEOG 390.

    Physical characteristics of the atmosphere. World climatic classification. Local atmospheric field study.
     

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 100 - Natural Disasters


    Formerly Listed as GEOL 120.

    Causes of natural disasters and their impact on people and property. Focuses on geological hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and floods.

    Credits 3
  
  • GEOL 101 - Exploring Planet Earth


    Basics of geology including the birth and evolution of planet Earth, geologic time, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, natural resources, and surface processes. Understanding how geology is important to your life.

    Credits 4
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
    Notes Satisfies the General Education Core requirement for a science course AND a laboratory science course.
  
  • GEOL 102 - Earth and Life Through Time


    Systematic review of the history of the earth and the methods by which the details of earth history are unraveled.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week with occasional weekend field trips.
    Notes Field trips required.
  
  • GEOL 105 - Introduction to Geology of National Parks


    Geology of selected national parks in North America with emphasis on surface processes including the causes and effects of Pleistocene glaciation and major tectonic events that have shaped the topography of the United States and Canada.

    Credits 3
  
  • GEOL 110 - Global Warming


    Learn the science of global warming, including natural climate variability versus human-caused climate change, and impacts on glaciers, water supplies, oceans, and species. Understand what models tell us about the future and the impact of our carbon footprints on sustainability.

    Credits 3
    Notes Satisfies the General Education Core requirement for a science course.
  
  • GEOL 126 - Science in American Culture


    Analysis of the relationship between science and American culture from colonial times to the present. Key themes include 1) evolving relationships between science, religion, and art, 2) influence of the maturation of the historical sciences on American culture in the nineteenth century, and 3) role of science in American public policy today.

    Credits 3
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture.
  
  • GEOL 130 - Water and the West


    Examination of the physical processes governing the distribution and movement of water within the western United States. Consideration of the impact of water on human settlement and activities and also the impact of human activities on the natural hydrologic system. Topics include case studies from throughout the western United States.

    Credits 3
  
  • GEOL 135 - Earth Resources and Society


    Geological availability, exploitation, and use of nonrenewable resources including metallic minerals, nonmetallic minerals, and energy resources. Duplicate credit not allowed in GEOL 135 and  .

    Credits 3
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture.
  
  • GEOL 140 - Conversations with Earth


    (Same as  .) Discussion of current topics of Earth’s origin, evolution, and habitability. Topics include: radioactive waste storage, catastrophic floods, evolution and extinction of life, climate change, global warming, volcanism, mountain building, ice ages, Nevada geology, ore deposits, and groundwater, among others.

    Credits 3
  
  • GEOL 141 - The Moon and Mars: Introduction to Planetary Geology


    Geologic principles of terrestrial planets, icy satellites, comets and asteroids. Introduction for non-science majors to remote sensing, robotic spacecraft exploration, and manned missions to the Moon and Mars.

    Credits 3
  
  • GEOL 220 - Mineralogy


    Study of classification, chemistry, physical properties, and crystallography of minerals forming rocks, ore deposits and soils. Identification of hand samples. Study of associations of minerals in geologic environments.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   /101D.
  
  • GEOL 221 - Introduction to Optical Mineralogy and Petrography


    Optical properties of minerals in thin section. Laboratory identification of minerals based on optical properties. Study of associations of minerals in thin sections of rocks. Introduction to petrography.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 301 - Fossil Record


    History and evolution of life as recorded in the fossil record.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or  .
  
  • GEOL 302 - Paleontology Laboratory


    Identification of the major fossil forming groups and analysis of paleontological data, with emphasis on invertebrates.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites or Corequisite:  .
    Notes Field trips required.
  
  • GEOL 303 - Global Environmental Change


    Interdisciplinary introduction to the dynamics of the interactions among the lithosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere and their effects on the environment throughout geologic time. Emphasizes dimensions and consequences of both natural and human induced climate change.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Junior standing.
  
  • GEOL 333 - Principles of Geomorphology


    Description and classification of landforms; evaluation of erosional and depositional processes with respect to earth materials, structure, and geologic history. Field trips required. Emphasis on fluvial, marine, eolian, and glacial origins of landforms.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 333L - Principles of Geomorphology Laboratory


    Laboratory component of  . Includes aerial photograph and topographic map interpretation, use of computers and geographic information systems in geomorphology, and other classroom and field exercises to complement lecture material.

    Credits 0
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 334 - Environmental Geology


    Control and use of the geological environment in modern society. Includes surface and sub-surface processes, mineral resources, and rock properties.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 335 - Earth Resources and the Environment


    Geological availability, exploitation, and use of nonrenewable natural resources including metallic minerals, nonmetallic, energy resources. Component of the Environmental Studies Program. Duplicate credit not allowed in   and GEOL 335.

    Credits 3
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture.
  
  • GEOL 341 - Structural Geology


    Study of structural features of the earth’s crust and their development. Laboratory work involves study and preparation of geologic maps and cross sections as well as structural analysis techniques.

    Credits 4
    Corequisites   or   and  .
    Prerequisites    or equivalent.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 348 - Field Geology I


    Basic tools and techniques of geologic mapping, map preparation, and report writing.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Nine hours field.
  
  • GEOL 352 - Field Trip


    Field trip to selected areas of geologic significance.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites   or equivalent and consent of instructor.
    May be repeated once for credit.
  
  • GEOL 370 - Intermediate Field Geology


    Intermediate-level techniques of geologic mapping, map preparation, and report writing. Preparation of reports includes professional maps, structure sections, and geologically reasonable interpretations. Requires three-week commitment during winter break.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 372 - Advanced Field Geology


    Advanced field techniques including analysis of geologically complex areas; independent and collaborative field projects, and preparation of professional maps and reports. Oral presentation of projects. Requires three-week commitment after spring semester.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 410 - Soil Classification and Resource Management


    Morphology and classification of soils based on their physical, chemical and mineralogical composition. Introduction to soil genesis, soil mapping, and the relationship of soils to the limitations and potentials of land use.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites Junior standing and either GEOG 101 or  , or consent of instructor.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three lectures and one laboratory per week.
  
  • GEOL 420 - Introduction to X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Spectrometry Methods


    Introduction to the principles and methods of x-ray analysis as applied to the study of minerals. Powder camera, diffractometry and spectrometry methods covered.

    Credits 4
    Corequisites GEOL 330.
    Prerequisites GEOL 220.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 425 - Principles of Geochemistry


    Formerly Listed as GEOL 330.

    Fundamental geochemical processes operating within the earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Topics include chemical differentiation of the earth, crystal chemistry, mineral stability and phase diagrams, aqueous geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, organic chemistry.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites  ;  .
  
  • GEOL 427 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology/Petrography


    Description, classification, and interpretation of igneous and metamorphic rocks in hand specimen and thin section.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   and  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
  
  • GEOL 429 - Geochemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics


    Survey of the basic principles of thermodynamics and kinetics and their application to geological processes; applications to include igneous, metamorphic, hydrothermal, diagenetic, weathering, and aqueous systems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites GEOL 330 and  .
  
  • GEOL 430 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Theory and Applications


    Survey of computer-based techniques in the storage, retrieval, analysis, and representation of spatially referenced data. Emphasis on the application of GIS technology to geologic problems such as natural hazard mapping, surface runoff and erosion, and environmental impact assessment.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   or  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours lab.
  
  • GEOL 433 - Glacial and Periglacial Geology


    Origin and regimen of glaciers. Geomorphology and stratigraphic analysis of glacial and associated non-glacial deposits and environments.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 434 - Quaternary Geology


    Survey of global paleoenvironments, including geologic, climatic, and biotic changes during the Quaternary. Examination of the geological record of marine and terrestrial glaciated and nonglaciated environments.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 436 - Quaternary Paleoecology


    Examination of the fossil record of the Quaternary including vertebrate, invertebrate, and floral assemblages. Emphasis on paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatological reconstructions.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Field trips required.
  
  • GEOL 437 - Paleoclimatology


    Paleoclimatic history of the Earth, with emphasis on the Neogene and Quaternary Periods. Survey of marine and terrestrial geological records of paleoclimate, including physical sedimentology, geochemistry, and pollen profiles of ice and sediment cores and speleothems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 440 - Volcanology


    Description and classification of volcanoes, volcanic eruptions, and volcanic deposits. Emphasis on the dynamics of volcanic eruptions, pyroclastic rocks, lava flows, and volcanic hazard assessment.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 443 - Plate Tectonics


    Study of the earth’s origin, age, thermal and magnetic history; the dynamics and internal structure of lithospheric plates; the mechanisms and geometric constraints of plate motion; and a review of the motions of plates in the past.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GEOL 444 - Tectonics of Orogenic Belts


    Study of crustal deformation and the creation of mountain belts around the world. Emphasis on the comparative structural development of different regions around the globe within the context of plate tectonics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • GEOL 445/445L - Geophysical Methods


    Introduction to geophysical methods, including measurement techniques, rock properties, and interpretation methods using seismology, gravity, magnetics, ground penetrating radar, resistivity and well logs.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites     or  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours lab.
  
  • GEOL 446 - Geologic Application in Remote Sensing


    Introduction in the acquisition, processing, and interpretation of remote sensing data. Topics covered include basic mapping concepts, the structure of remote sensing data and analysis, thermal and radar techniques, and classification schemes.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites   or   and  .
    Prerequisites GEOL 101.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Laboratory computer based. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 449 - Geochronology


    Theoretical foundations and modern analytical techniques used in isotopic dating of rocks. Discussion of applications to specific geologic problems and the thermal significance of isotopic dates. Survey of new dating techniques.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • GEOL 462 - Principles of Stratigraphy and Sedimentation


    Analysis and application of stratigraphic concepts, and the genesis and classification of sediments. Study of regional stratigraphic patterns and their related sedimentary environments.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   , and  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 471 - Petroleum Geology


    Origin, migration, accumulation, and geologic distribution of petroleum. Surface, sub-surface and geophysical methods of exploration.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   and  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 474 - Hydrogeology


    Factors controlling the occurrence and distribution of water resource, its quality and quantity, methods of exploration and development.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites    and  .
  
  • GEOL 477 - Geology of Metallic Ore Deposits


    Geology of metallic ore deposits, origin, occurrence, and alteration. Application of ore deposit characteristics to exploration.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   and  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Field trips required.
  
  • GEOL 478 - Hydrogeochemistry


    Principles of aquatic geochemistry such as chemical thermodynamics, tableaux, and oxidation reduction and environmental organic geochemistry such as physicochemical properties of organic compounds and air/water/soil exchange of organic compounds for environmental studies. Concepts for practical environmental problems, geochemical modeling, and contaminant transport.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • GEOL 485 - Engineering Geology


    Application of physical geology to the construction industry. Consideration given to landslide problems, sites for dams, bridges, tunnels and canals; and possible control of erosion and sedimentation by rivers and oceans.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • GEOL 488 - Microtechniques in Geoscience


    Microanalytical techniques including transmitted and reflected light petrology and petrography, micro-imaging scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron microprobe (EMP), chemical microanalyses (EMP), fluid inclusion microthermometry, and melt inclusion petrography. Project tailored to the student’s interest required.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   /  .
  
  • GEOL 491 - Seminar


    Weekly lecture in selected fields of geoscience; topics vary by semester. May be repeated to a maximum of three credits.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
  
  • GEOL 495 - Independent Study and Research


    Independent study and research projects in some field of geology. Open only to upper-division students. Proposed project for study and/or research must be submitted in writing to the department chair for approval and credit evaluation prior to registration.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Upper-division student and consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • GEOL 496 - Advanced Topics in Geoscience


    Variety of advanced studies of current and/or topical interest in specialized areas of geoscience.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Varies depending upon the specific topic.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • GEOL 497 - Senior Thesis


    Independent original research in geoscience. Requires a written thesis and an oral exam. Proposed project of study must be submitted in writing to the department chair and undergraduate coordinator at least two weeks prior to registration.

    Credits 3-6
  
  • GER 113 - Elementary German I


    Development of language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; structural analysis. Emphasis on speaking. See department for placement.

    Credits 3
  
  • GER 114 - Elementary German II


    Development of language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing; structural analysis. Emphasis on speaking. See department for placement.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GER 116 - Elementary German Conversation


    Development of conversation skills based on reading selections, with review of grammar as needed. Not open to students having credit for   , or more advanced courses.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GER 187 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture I


    Elementary course work in German language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    May be repeated to a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • GER 213 - Intermediate German I


    Structural review; conversation, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • GER 214 - Intermediate German II


    Structural review; conversation, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • GER 225 - German Grammar Review


    Intensive grammar review for those who have completed intermediate German. Reinforces basic grammar concepts as well as practices advanced and unfamiliar constructions. Reading comprehension exercises with appropriate target-language texts also included.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GER 287 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture II


    Intermediate course work in German language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    May be repeated to a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • GER 299 - Introductory German Texts in the Humanities


    Supplements English-language content of selected 100-200 level courses in the College of Liberal Arts with course-appropriate readings in German for language credit. Offered only in conjunction with specific instructors and course sections.

    Credits 2
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.
  
  • GER 301 - Third-Year German: Composition and Conversation I


    Development of oral proficiency, writing skills, and reading for comprehension.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent achievement on the placement test.
  
  • GER 302 - Third-Year German: Composition and Conversation II


    Development of oral proficiency, writing skills, and reading for comprehension.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent achievement on the placement test.
  
  • GER 311 - Introduction to German Linguistics


    Structure of the German language: phonetics, phonemics, morphemics, and basic notions of the syntactic structure. Offered in English.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • GER 312 - German Phonetics


    Intensive practice of German sounds and intonation. Training in phonetic transcription. Exercises based on words, sentences, and texts designed to help the students achieve a native-like pronunciation. Offered in English.

    Credits 3
  
  • GER 321 - German Culture and Civilization


    General study of Germany as a nation from earliest times to the present; its cultural, social, economic, and political evolution; its present problems and its role in the world today. Taught in English.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Nine credits of English composition and literature.
  
  • GER 322 - Contemporary Germany and Austria


    Survey of cultural developments in German-speaking Europe since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Responses of prominent writers, musicians, filmmakers, politicians, etc., to issues such as continued East/West German tension, Nazism’s legacy, the role of the EU, violence toward foreigners, the transatlantic partnership, globalization, and more. In English.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GER 331 - German Literature in Translation — Drama


    German plays in English translations with the main emphasis on the modern period, including works by Hauptmann, Brecht, Frisch, Durrenmatt, and Weiss. Specifically designed for non-majors and may not be counted toward a German major or minor.

    Credits 3
  
  • GER 332 - German Literature in Translation — Prose


    German short stories and novels in English translations with the main emphasis on the modern period, including works by Mann, Hesse, Kafka, and Grass. Specifically designed for non-majors and may not be counted toward a German major or minor.

    Credits 3
  
  • GER 341 - German Literature to 1624


    Preliminary survey of German literature from the Hildebrandslied to Opitz.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • GER 342 - German Literature from 1624 to the Present


    Preliminary survey of German literature from the early seventeenth century to the present. Presents representative literary texts against their respective socio-historical background.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • GER 387 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture III


    Advanced course work in German language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated for a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • GER 399 - Advanced German Texts in the Humanities


    Supplements English-language content of selected 300-level courses in the College of Liberal Arts with course-appropriate readings in German for language credit. Offered only in conjunction with specific instructors and course sections.

    Credits 2
    May be repeated to a maximum of 4 credits.
  
  • GER 401 - Advanced German Composition and Conversation I


    Composition course designed to improve writing skills for students at the senior level. Taught entirely in the target language and emphasizes stylistics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GER 402 - Advanced German Composition and Conversation II


    Advanced stylistics class with emphasis on writing, vocabulary building, rhetorical figures and analysis of texts.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • GER 405 - German Translation and Interpretation


    Introduction to the theory and practice of written translation and oral interpretation from German into English. Includes practice with literary texts from diverse genres as well as business, legal and political texts. Strategies of oral interpretation and computer-based translation also introduced, critiqued and practiced.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Taught in German.
 

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