Feb 27, 2024  
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Courses


 
  
  • EE 430 - Transmission Lines


    Telegraphist’s equations; transient response—steady state response; reflection diagrams; Smith chart; matching techniques and designs; narrow and broadband impedance matching techniques; scattering matrix; introduction to stripline and microstrip devices.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 330
  
  • EE 431 - Engineering Optics


    Engineering applications of optics. Includes aperture and grating antennas, holography, optical image processing, optical waveguides, and tomography.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • EE 432 - Antenna Engineering


    Fundamentals of antennas and antenna design; linear wire, loop, and antenna arrays; antenna measurements.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • EE 436 - Active and Passive Microwave Engineering


    Waveguides, dispersion diagrams, microwave network analysis, broadband impedance matching, open and closed resonators, power dividers, directional couplers, filters, circulators, phase shifters, solid state amplifier, and oscillator design.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • EE 442 - Power Electronics


    Topics include: diode circuits and rectifiers, power semiconductor diodes and transistors, thyristors and static switches, controlled rectifiers, AC voltage controllers, DC choppers, inverters, AC and DC drives, power supplies and protection of devices and circuits.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 320 and EE 340
  
  • EE 450 - Solid State Devices


    Semiconductor physics, pn diode, bipolar junction transistor, metal semiconductor FET devices, metal oxide semiconductor FET devices.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 320, MATH 431
  
  • EE 450L - Solid State Characterization Laboratory


    Capacitance and voltage, Hall mobility and carrier concentration, oxidation and etching silicon dioxide processing of silicon.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites EE 450
  
  • EE 451 - Electronic and Magnetic Materials and Devices


    Semiconductors, dielectrics, ferroelectrics, antiferromagnetics, derromagnetics, ferrimagnetics, crystal structure, structure-property relations, device applications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 330
  
  • EE 452 - Introduction to Optical Electronics


    Topics include: modulation of light, display devices, lasers, photodetectors, fiber optics, engineering applications, and systems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 330
  
  • EE 453 - Introduction to Nanotechnology


    Overview of Nanotechnology, Physics of the Solid State, Properties of Individual Nanostructures, Bulk Nanostructured materials, magnetic nanoparticles, Quantum Wells, Wires and Dots, Self-Assembly and Catalysis, nanoscale Biological materials.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 320
  
  • EE 460 - Analog and Digital Communications


    Review of Fourier theory, linear system theory, probability and random processes. Modulation and detection. Noise in modulation systems. Introduction to digital data transmission.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 361
  
  • EE 462 - Advanced Digital Communications


    Information theory and fundamental limits on performance, digital coding of waveforms, pulse shaping for baseband transmission, digital bandpass modulations, channel coding.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 460.
  
  • EE 466 - Wireless and Mobile Communication Systems


    The study of wireless systems including cellular telephone systems, wireless local area networks and other wireless data services. Topics include digital modulation techniques, frequency reuse, diversity techniques, multiple access schemes and channel modeling including path loss, shadowing, fading and multipath interference.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EE 460.
  
  • EE 472 - Digital Control Systems


    Introduction to discrete time of control. State space representation of linear systems; stability; the concepts of controllability and observability. Sample data control system design techniques, including pole placement, observer design.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • EE 480 - Digital Signal Processing


    Review of discrete linear system theory including the z-transform, the Fourier transform, discrete and fast Fourier transform. Sampling, reconstruction and multirate systems, IIR and FIR digital filter design including digital filter structures and finite word length effects.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • EE 480L - Digital Signal Processing Laboratory


    Laboratory projects and exercises in digital signal processing including the design and implementation of FIR, IIR, and multirate systems.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites EE 480.
  
  • EE 482 - Introduction to Biomedical Signals and Systems


    Introduction to biomedical signals, transduction devices, bioelectric potentials and sensors. Application of electrical signal and system principles to biosignals, such as cardiovascular electrical signals, neural electrical communication, and diagnostic ultrasound. Includes current biomedical engineering topics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • EE 493 - Independent Study


    Independent study of a selected engineering topic.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Senior standing in Electrical Engineering.
    May be repeated once for credit.
  
  • EE 494 - Fundamental Engineering Examination


    Course is used by undergraduate programs to prepare students for FE examination.

    Credits 0
    Corequisites  .
  
  • EE 495 - Special Topics


    Covers experimental and other topics which may be of current interest.

    Credits 1-4
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing in Engineering.
    May be repeated once under a different topic. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
    Notes Topics and credits to be announced. May have a laboratory.
  
  • EE 497 - Senior Design Project I


    Capstone synthesis course to teach students the design process from problem definition, team building, to project planning, paper design, written and oral communications.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites   and consent of faculty advisor.
  
  • EE 498 - Senior Design Project II


    Capstone synthesis course to teach students hardware and software implementation of their projects proposed and paper-designed in EE 497, testing and recommendations, project presentation.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites EE 497 and final semester senior.
  
  • EED 100 - Entertainment Engineering and Design Seminar I


    Acquaints students with current trends and practices in the entertainment industry. Weekly discussions, guest speakers or presentations on current entertainment topics.

    Credits 1
    May be repeated for a maximum of two credits.
  
  • EED 110 - Material Science and Fabrication Techniques


    Provides an overview of the many types of materials currently used in the entertainment industry; the science of these materials; fabrication methods using these materials; and hands-on experience with these materials and techniques.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites Prior or concurrent enrollment in EED 100, MATH 181 or higher.
  
  • EED 111 - Basic Kinetic Structures


    Provides an overview of the many types of kinetic structures currently used in the entertainment industry; the science of these structures; fabrication methods using these structures; and hands-on experience working with these structures.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • EED 120 - Intro to Entertainment Technologies for the Non-Major


    Provides an overview of the many types of technology currently employed in the entertainment industry. Emphasis will be given to examples developed in the past 10 years.

    Credits 3
  
  • EED 130 - Entertainment Visualization


    Fundamental concepts of computer visualization applicable to the entertainment industry.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites EED 111.
    Prerequisites EED 100, 110, 111.
  
  • EED 200 - Entertainment Engineering and Design Seminar II


    Acquaints students with current trends and practices in the entertainment industry. Weekly discussions, guest speakers or presentations on current entertainment topics.

    Credits 1
    May be repeated for a maximum of two credits.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours  .
    Notes Required of all majors. To be taken in sophomore year.
  
  • EED 210 - Multi-Media Design


    Focuses on the conceptual, technical and visual design skills required to create multimedia environments for the entertainment industry.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • EED 220 - Design for Live Entertainment


    Introduction to the aesthetic principles of entertainment design. Study and practice of design for live entertainment through controlled use of color, line, mass, space, and light.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • EED 250 - History of Entertainment and Technology


    Study of the evolution of entertainment in the 19th century to the present as an art form and as a science.

    Credits 3
  
  • EED 300 - Entertainment Engineering and Design Seminar III


    Acquaints students with current trends and practices in the entertainment industry. Weekly discussions, guest speakers or presentations on current entertainment topics.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites EED 200.
    May be repeated for a maximum of two credits.
    Notes Required of all majors. To be taken in junior year.
  
  • EED 310 - Product Design I


    Students will learn to synthesize technology and aesthetics in the service of the entertainment industry. Emphasis is placed on conceptual thinking, creativity, risk-taking, non-fad-driven aesthetic appropriateness, personal motivation, networking, and interdisciplinary flexibility and co-operation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 220.
  
  • EED 320 - Rigging and Structural Design Principles


    Investigation of rigging systems in the entertainment industry and their demands on the structural design of a venue. Focuses on current trends in the entertainment industry.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 220.
  
  • EED 330 - Programmable Systems for the Entertainment Industry


    Investigation of programmable logic systems in the entertainment industry with emphasis on current industry practices.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 220
  
  • EED 400 - Entertainment Engineering and Design Seminar IV


    Acquaints students with current trends and practices in the entertainment industry. Weekly discussions, guest speakers or presentations on current entertainment topics.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites Prerequisite; EED 300.
    May be repeated for a maximum of two credits.
    Notes Required of all majors. To be taken in senior year.
  
  • EED 410 - Design Aesthetics in Entertainment Design


    Examination of the aesthetic principles of entertainment design. Study and practice of design for the stage through controlled use of color, line, mass, space, and light.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 220.
  
  • EED 420 - Entertainment Product Design II


    Students will learn to synthesize technology and aesthetics in the service of the entertainment industry. Emphasis is placed on conceptual thinking, creativity, risk-taking, non-fad-driven aesthetic appropriateness, personal motivation, networking, and interdisciplinary flexibility and co-operation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 310.
  
  • EED 431 - Control Systems for the Entertainment Industry


    Investigation of hydraulic, electrical and show control systems in the entertainment industry with emphasis on current industry practices.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 330.
  
  • EED 432 - Rigging Systems for the Entertainment Industry


    Investigation of rigging systems in the entertainment industry with emphasis on current industry practices.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 320.
  
  • EED 441 - Motion Capture


    Students will learn the technology used to create a 3D representation of a live performance or action through the use of modern technologies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 220.
  
  • EED 442 - Animatronics Techniques


    Automata and Robots support humans, and can and interact with them. Introduces the technologies that enable computer-driven stagecraft, concepts of feedback control, robot control, and the computer technologies (hardware and software) to coordinate and automate sequences of events.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 220.
  
  • EED 451 - Entertainment Venue Design


    Students will learn the principles and requirements used in designing entertainment venues with emphasis on current practices.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites EED 220.
  
  • EED 491 - Special Topics in EED


    Topics announced in the class schedule each year. May be used for EED degree requirement with permission from program coordinator.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites EED 111.
    May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits.
  
  • EED 493 - Internship in EED


    Internship at regional/national centers of entertainment activity.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites EED 220.
    May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits.
  
  • EED 495 - Supervised Individual Study


    Tutorial study of special problems in entertainment engineering and design. Student submits a detailed project description agreed upon first by student and instructor and then by two other members of the EED faculty. May not be used in meeting the core requirement credits.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites Junior or senior standing; permission in advance of registration from the program coordinator/advisor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits.
  
  • EED 497 - Senior Design I


    The first of two capstone design courses for Entertainment Engineering students. Students will begin a major design experience that uses knowledge and skills from prior courses and incorporates appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. Students will begin the design process including research, conceptualization, feasibility assessment, and establishing design requirements.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites   and consent of faculty advisor.
  
  • EED 498 - Senior Design II


    The second of two capstone design courses for Entertainment Engineering students. Students complete the major design experience that began in  . Students will complete the design process including completing a preliminary design and establishing design requirements, and analyzing, producing, testing and presenting the design.

    Credits 2
  
  • EGG 100 - People and Technology


    Problems and issues caused by and solved by applications of technology. Such issues as natural disasters, populations, food supply, distribution of energy, and other topics considered.

    Credits 3
    Notes Satisfies the General Education Core Science requirement.
  
  • EGG 101 - Introduction to Engineering Experience


    Seminar: Introduction to UNLV learning outcomes and the programs that reside within the College of Engineering. Topics include professional ethics, technical communication, the design process, and technology’s impact on a global society.

    Credits 2
  
  • EGG 102 - Introduction to Engineering Design


    Engineering problems for math. Introduces the design process to include team design, problem formulation, statement of criteria, brainstorming, decision matrix, preparation of specifications and presentation of results.

    Credits 2
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • EGG 102L - Introduction to Design Laboratory


    Introduction to techniques used in the design process: sketching, dimensioning, brainstorming, decision trees, decision matrices, P.C. software packages.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites EGG 102.
  
  • EGG 130 - Control of Environmental Pollution


    (Same as ENV 130.) Introduction to pollution control methods, beginning with water-borne diseases and sanitation. Progression to mass balance concepts and development of pollution control measures designed to improve air and water quality and minimize risk of exposure to hazardous wastes. Not for credit towards engineering degree.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites CHEM 105, BIOL 100, MATH 128.
  
  • EGG 300 - Quality Control and Quality Improvement Engineering


    Quality assurance as a system problem. Components and theory of the system presented including quality fundamentals, process definition, basic statistics, sampling distributions, control charts, assignable causes, diagnosing a process, and process improvement. Current quality philosophies discussed.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites MATH 182 and junior standing.
  
  • EGG 307 - Engineering Economics


    Engineering economic analysis for the evaluation of technical alternatives and necessary economic trade-offs made in planning, designing, and operating engineering systems.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Admission to construction management, civil, mechanical or electrical engineering major.
  
  • EGG 412 - Engineering Law


    Survey course in legal principles and theory for contracts, methods of doing business, patents, and copyrights. Topics include: product liability, nuisance, defamation, and other torts.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Senior standing in engineering.
  
  • EGG 417 - Mold Making and Casting


    Advanced mold making and casting techniques culminating in 3-D objects made in clay, porcelain, aluminum, bronze, and plaster.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites ME 220.
  
  • EGG 450 - Solar and Renewable Energy Utilization


    Introduction to renewable energy applications. Includes environmental motivations, historical perspectives, solar photovoltaic and thermal applications, implications in building designs, wind energy, biomass, alternative fuels, geothermal power utilization, utility considerations, and political and economic factors.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Admission to the Solar and Renewable Energy Minor and upper division standing.
  
  • EGG 451 - Ergonomics


    Design of the work environment to facilitate the safety of the worker and the improvement of work performance, with emphasis on the biomechanical requirements and musculoskeletal consequences of work activity.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites ME 242 and ME 302, or PHYS 151 and 152.
  
  • EGG 460 - Technology Commercialization


    Combines the perspectives of engineering design, design for manufacturing, industrial design, and technology market identification into a unified product design method. Instruction and hands-on examples of customer needs to quality measures, concept generation, prototype optimization, and market introduction.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or   or   or instructor permission.
  
  • ENG 98 - Preparatory Composition


    Writing-intensive workshop course for students with low placement scores to help them learn and practice college-level critical reading and essay writing strategies.

    Credits 3
    Notes Credit for this course does not count toward the total needed for graduation. S/F grading only.
  
  • ENG 101 - Composition I


    Evidence-based, writing intensive course designed to improve critical thinking, reading, and writing proficiencies through guidance in writing the thesis-driven essay. Students develop strategies for turning their experience, observations, and analyses into evidence suitable for academic writing. Emphasis on writing the short, focused, concretely developed college paper.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Qualifying score on a placement exam (see Admission Information, Placement Examination.)
  
  • ENG 101E - Composition I Extended I


    The first part of the ENG 101E/101F sequence, an alternative to ENG 101 for students requiring additional instruction in critical thinking, reading, and writing the thesis-driven essay.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Placement exam.
    Notes Completion of both ENG 101E and 101F fulfills ENG 101 requirement. S/U grading only.
  
  • ENG 101F - Composition I Extended II


    ENG 101F is the second part of the ENG 101E/101F sequence, an alternative to ENG 101 for students requiring additional instruction in critical thinking, reading, and writing the thesis-driven essay.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Satisfactory completion of  .
    Notes Completion of both ENG 101E and 101F fulfills ENG 101 requirement.
  
  • ENG 102 - Composition II


    Builds on the critical thinking, reading, and writing skills developed in ENG 101. Students learn the processes necessary for collecting and incorporating research material into their writing. They learn to cite and document research sources and how to develop arguments and support them with sound evidence.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  , or equivalent.
    Notes Research paper and library orientation required.
  
  • ENG 113 - Composition I for International Students


    For non-native speakers of English to develop fluency and confidence in writing by extensive practice in the narrative, descriptive, and expository modes of discourse.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Michigan placement test score of 76+ and score of 40+ on writing sample, or TOEFL score of 500+ and Test of Written English score of 5+.
    Notes Satisfies the English 101 requirement for international students. Not intended for native speakers of English. No duplicate credit for ENG 101.
  
  • ENG 113E - Composition I for International Students Extended I


    ENG 113E is first part of two-term sequence. Instruction in narrative, descriptive, expository writing for NNS students better served with a two-semester format for mastering academic writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Placement (TOEFL CBT 167, MTELP 70, or IBT 60 and TWE 4 or equivalent).
    Notes ENG 113E must be completed prior to ENG 113F, which fulfills the NSHE and UNLV freshman comp requirement. S/F grading only.
  
  • ENG 113F - Composition I for International Students Extended II


    ENG 113F is the second part of the ENG 113E/F sequence, an alternative to ENG 113. Limited to non-native speakers, the course focuses on critical thinking and the thesis driven essay. Completion of ENG 113E/F satisfies the requirement for Freshman Composition I.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites S in ENG 113E.
    Prerequisites Satisfactory completion of ENG 113E and instructor approval. Letter grade.
  
  • ENG 114 - Composition II for International Students


    Continuation of ENG 113 with emphasis on critical thinking and practice in persuasive discourse, as applied to selected literary texts.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites ENG 113.
    Notes Intended to meet the needs of non-native speakers of English. Library orientation required. Satisfies the ENG 102 requirement for international students.
  
  • ENG 203 - Introduction to Literary Study


    Critical examination of selected literary works, emphasizing the techniques of literary analysis.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 205 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry


    Workshop designed to hone students’ skills in writing fiction or poetry.

    Credits 3
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • ENG 206 - Intermediate Composition


    Builds on writing competencies developed in ENG 101 and ENG 102. Includes more advanced rhetorical strategies, including the use of visual rhetoric, and explores a variety of academic, professional, and public genres.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 210 - Introduction to Semantics


    Forms of linguistic expression through a survey of the principles of general semantics.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 211 - Introduction to Linguistics


    Development and fundamental concepts of the linguistic approach to grammar and language analysis.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 231 - World Literature I


    Introduces students to world masterworks from antiquity through the mid-seventeenth century. (Fulfills the university Second-Year Seminar requirement).

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 232 - World Literature II


    Introduces students to world masterworks from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. Fulfills the university Second-Year Seminar (SYS) requirement.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 235 - Survey of English Literature I


    Major figures and movements in English literature from the beginnings to 1800.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 236 - Survey of English Literature II


    Major figures and movements in English literature from 1800 to the present.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 241 - Survey of American Literature I


    Major figures and movements in American literature from the Colonial Period to the Civil War.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 242 - Survey of American Literature II


    Major figures and movements in American literature from the Civil War to the present.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 243 - Introduction to the Short Story


    Elements of the short story, its variety of forms, representative authors.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 252 - Introduction to Drama


    Elements of drama, its basic forms, representative plays of world drama.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 253 - Introduction to Contemporary Drama


    American, English, and European drama of the period since World War II, including such writers as Miller, Albee, Ionesco, and Pinter.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 261 - Introduction to Poetry


    Elements of poetry, its basic types and forms, representative poets in English.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 271 - Introduction to Shakespeare


    Selected works by Shakespeare. Specifically designed for non-English majors.

    Credits 3
    Notes English majors should enroll in ENG 434A or 434B.
  
  • ENG 275 - Contemporary Literature


    Reading of recent literature of various types to acquaint students with contemporary writers.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 278 - Readings in the Contemporary Novel


    Study of the post-World War II novel, its development, and direction.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 290 - Introduction to African-American Literature


    (Same as AAS 290.) Introduction to the poetry, fiction, drama, and non‑fiction of African-Americans.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 291 - Slave Narratives, Literature, and Imagery


    (Same as AAS 291.) Interdisciplinary examination of American slavery through the narrative form, including autobiographical, literary, and cinematic sources. Includes slave narratives and novels, as well as films. Focuses on the ways American slavery is interpreted through these and other popular forms.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 292 - Introduction to Chicano Literature


    Introduction to Chicano literature through a study of classic and contemporary works of prose, poetry, and theater. Intended for non-English majors.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 298 - Writing About Literature


    A writing-intensive introduction to English studies, including the genres of poetry, fiction, and drama and the basic methods and terms of analysis. Primarily designed for English majors and minors and for Education majors with an English emphasis.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 303 - Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism


    Survey of literary theory and criticism from Plato and Aristotle to the present.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 400 - Document Design


    Explores fundamental theories and practices of designing professional documents. Considers how design is influenced by genre and rhetorical context.

    Credits 3
    Notes Students will use appropriate tools to design printed documents.
  
  • ENG 401A - Advanced Composition


    Explores writing and literacy. Students will develop greater awareness of themselves as strategic writers by studying and creating texts for different audiences, purposes and contexts in a variety of styles and genres.

    Credits 3
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits with consent of instructor.
  
  • ENG 402A - Advanced Creative Writing


    Advanced workshop designed to hone students’ skills in writing fiction or poetry.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites ENG 205.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • ENG 405B - Research and Editing


    Library research, as distinct from experimental or laboratory research, and report writing and editing for students in all disciplines.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
  
  • ENG 405C - Writing for Publication


    Intensive study of the business of writing, designed to serve the needs of the freelance writer. Includes discussion of literary markets and popular literary genres.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites ENG 401A.
  
  • ENG 406B - Electronic Documents and Publications


    Explores advanced principles of information architecture and content development for web-based documents and publications. Students will plan, design, develop, edit and publish in a variety of web-based genres.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 407A - Fundamentals of Business Writing


    Examines the rhetorical principles and composing practices necessary for writing effective business letters, memos, and reports.

    Credits 3
  
  • ENG 407B - Fundamentals of Technical Writing


    Examines the rhetorical principles and composing practices necessary for writing effective technical documents and the role of writing in technical and industrial settings.

    Credits 3
 

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