Jun 13, 2024  
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Courses


 
  
  • CEE 464 - Airport Design


    Fundamental engineering principles in planning, location, design, and operation of airport facilities (terminals, apron areas, taxiways, and runways); ground access, drainage, aircraft characteristics and performance as they relate to airport design, aircraft noise and environmental considerations; elements of air traffic control.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEE 466 - Geometric Design of Highways


    Design of visible elements of highways such as horizontal and vertical alignment and cross-section in accordance with design controls derived from characteristics of vehicles, drivers, traffic, and pedestrians interacting with geometry, terrain, and environment to yield a safe roadway at design capacity.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEE 467 - Computer Applications in Transportation Engineering


    Application of computer software models and programs for solving planning, design, and operations problems in transportation engineering. Includes traffic network analysis models, transportation planning, and impact models.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEE 468 - GIS Applications in Civil Engineering


    Introduction to the basics of Geographic Information Systems software and hardware and their use in civil engineering. Emphasis on the application of GIS for the planning, design, operations, and maintenance of civil engineering systems. Laboratory sessions provide hands-on experience with GIS software and hardware using specific examples/case studies of GIS applications in various areas of civil engineering.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  , and any one of:  ,  ,  ,  .
  
  • CEE 476 - Earthquake Engineering for Structures


    Introduction to vibration theory; seismic hazards; spectra of vibrations. Application of UBC Simplified Static Method and Static Method. Introduction to design of earthquake resistant structures. Discussion of diaphragms, chords and struts.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or    or  .
  
  • CEE 477 - Design of Underground Structures


    Design of tunnels, shafts, and underground chambers in soil and hard rocks.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEE 478 - Applied Finite Element Analysis


    Introduction to the finite element method with computer applications to engineering problems in structural analysis, two- and three-dimensional solid mechanics and continuum.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites    or  .
  
  • CEE 480 - Concrete Structure Design


    Introduction to design of structural systems in concrete. Design of beams, one-way slabs, columns and beam-columns. Design of T-beams and doubly-reinforced beams. Anchorage and bar cutoffs.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CEE 482 - Design of Timber Structures


    Determination of simple wind and seismic forces on one and two story structures. Discussion of engineering properties of wood. Introduction to the design of sawn beams for flexure, shear, bearing and deflection. Introduction to the design of axially loaded columns. Brief introduction to the design of trusses, diaphragms and shear walls.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CEE 491 - Independent Study


    Independent design project or study of a selected engineering topic.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Senior standing in engineering, or consent of instructor with departmental approval.
    May be repeated up to a maximum of three credits.
    Notes May not be used to replace a required course.
  
  • CEE 495 - Special Topics


    Outlet for experimental and other topics which may be of current interest.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing in engineering.
    May be repeated once under different topic.
    Notes Topics and credits to be announced. May have a laboratory.
  
  • CEE 496 - Civil Engineering Professional Practicum


    Engineering practicum to perform work, preferably related to civil engineering design, supervised by experienced professional, in an agency, company or institution doing civil engineering work. Practicum proposal must be approved by chair prior to starting of work. Student report approved by supervisor.

    Credits 0
    Prerequisites The course should be taken in a year prior to graduation and should be completed within that time period; approval of host firm and Department Chair.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • CEE 498 - Civil Engineering Capstone Design


    Capstone course to involve students in the design process from project planning through analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and recommendations. Team efforts and oral, written, and graphical communications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites All required CEE courses except   and   and any one of  ,  , or  .
  
  • CEE 499 - Fundamentals of Engineering Examination Registration


    Preparation for and completion of the Fundamentals of Engineering Civil Discipline-Specific Examination administered by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites All required CEE courses except   and   and any one of  ,  , or  .
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • CEM 100 - Fundamentals of Construction Management


    Overview of construction industry roles, responsibilities, and risks from perspectives of owners, constructors, designers, financial institutions, and governmental agencies. Study of construction process techniques and applications.

    Credits 3
  
  • CEM 150 - Fundamentals of Construction Science


    Formerly Listed as (Formerly CEM 101)

    Introduction to engineering problem solving applied to construction science. Fundamental topics include units, engineering analysis, early preliminaries of statics, and the built environment from a mechanics perspective emphasizing construction science

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  / .
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 250 - Construction Materials and Methods


    Construction materials and components; materials specifications, descriptions, and usage; construction techniques,and optimal economic selection. Sustainable construction aspects considered.

    Credits 4
    Corequisites     or    .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Field trips.
  
  • CEM 250L - Construction Materials and Methods


    Construction materials and components; materials specifications, descriptions, and usage; construction techniques and optimal economic selection.

    Credits 0
    Prerequisites   or   and  / .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Field trips.
  
  • CEM 253 - Quantity Surveying and Document Analysis


    Quantity take off and comprehension, understanding, and critical analysis of documents from engineers, architects, other design professionals, governmental agencies, vendors, suppliers, and other contractors.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • CEM 253L - Quantity Surveying and Document Analysis


    Quantity take off and comprehension, understanding, and critical analysis of documents from engineers, architects, other design professionals, governmental agencies, vendors, suppliers, and other contractors.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • CEM 270 - Construction Engineering Mechanics


    Basic principles of engineering mechanics for constructors. Vectors, static analysis, stress, strain, Mohr’s circle, beams, columns and trusses are covered. Computer applications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 300 - Construction Practicum I


    Supervised internship with one of a variety of industry organizations, including owners, contractors, designers. suppliers/manufacturers, government entitites, etc.. Minimum 10,000 word practicum report required with oral presentation before supervising faculty member(s).

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  ,  ,  .
    Notes S/F grading only
  
  • CEM 301 - Construction Safety


    Field of construction safety covering OSHA safety, health and environmental challenges for owners, contractors, subcontractors, and construction workers. Covers zero-injury techniques.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  .
  
  • CEM 330 - Soils and Foundations for Construction


    Introduction to basic concepts of soils and foundations including compaction, compressibility, settlement, shear strength, and site investigations. Problem soils and solutions. Types and systems of foundations, bearing capacity, sheeting, and braced excavations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or  ,  / .
  
  • CEM 350 - Facility Systems Design and Construction I


    Introduction to mechanical systems for facilities including HVAC systems, boilers, chillers, air-handling units, fire protection, piping, and plumbing systems. Sustainable/green construction concepts. Energy conservation. Detailed knowledge to analyze needs, scope, design and construction of these systems as well as address design-construction integration issues.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  / ,  /  or  / .
  
  • CEM 351 - Facility Systems Design and Construction II


    Introduction to electrical equipment and electrical systems for facilities including power, wiring, lighting, controls, automation, security, and life safety systems. Sustainable/green construction concepts. Energy conservation. Detailed knowledge to analyze needs, scope, design and construction of these systems as well as address design-construction integration issues.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites    ,     or    .
  
  • CEM 370 - Steel and Wood Design in Construction


    Analysis and design of simple steel, timber, and wood structures using AISC, AF&PA, ICC, APA, AITC and ASCE 7. Computer applications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 372 - Concrete Design in Construction


    Analysis and design of simple concrete structures using ACI 318 and ASCE 7. Computer applications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 400 - Construction Practicum II


    Supervised internship with one of a variety of industry organizations, including owners, contractors, designers. suppliers/manufacturers, government entitites, etc. Minimum 10,000 word practicum report required with oral presentation before supervising faculty member(s).

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  ,  ,  ,  ,  .
    Notes S/F grading only
  
  • CEM 432 - Temporary Construction Structures


    Analysis, design, and construction of temporary structures including formwork, falsework, shoring, rigging, and access units. Cost analysis. Computer analysis applications. Safety consideration.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or    or    or  .
  
  • CEM 450 - Construction Field Inspection


    Construction field inspection at project sites and vendor surveillance. Construction codes including IBC/IRC, IPC, IMC, and NEC. Standards including ACI, AISC, ANSI, ASTM, and AWS. Quality assurance/ quality control concepts/development, techniques, analysis, enforcement and documentation.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites   for engineering science option.
    Prerequisites   or  ,   or    for management option.
  
  • CEM 451/451L - Construction Estimating


    Principles and procedures used in estimating construction costs. Application of quantity determination, estimate pricing, specifications, subcontractor and supplier solicitation, risk assessment and risk analysis, and final bidding preparation. Computer-based estimating used for semester project.

    Credits 4
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites  ,  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • CEM 452/452L - Construction Cost Control


    Construction cost management including productivity and cost reporting/analysis concepts. Financial/cost issues/cash flow for the construction firm including reporting methods with percentage of completion techniques. Performance/profitability enhancement. Earned value management. Construction bonding and insurance issues. Firm and jobsite analysis. Case studies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • CEM 453/453L - Construction Scheduling


    Scheduling and resource optimization. Includes short-interval scheduling, Gantt charts, linear, and matrix scheduling formats. Network techniques including CPM and PERT concepts and calculations. Computer applications.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • CEM 454 - Heavy Construction Methods and Equipment


    Characteristics, capabilities, limitations, uses, and selection techniques for heavy construction methods and equipment Process planning, simulation, fleet operations, and maintenance programs. Field trip(s) where appropriate.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   .
  
  • CEM 455 - Construction Management Practice


    Direction and operation of construction organizations with examination of general contracting, design-build, and construction management methods. Synthesis of project management concepts, applications, and limitations through case studies and semester project.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  .
  
  • CEM 457 - Project Management


    Principles and application for effective project planning including finance, economic decisions making, risk management, team alignment, and pre-project planning processes and tools.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or equivalent, senior standing.
  
  • CEM 458 - Design-Build for Construction Management


    Design-build techniques and concepts for a variety of project types understanding the technical aspects associated with design/construction of these projects as well as the financial and management aspects required for a successful completion. Design-construct team building. Liability issues.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • CEM 459 - Quantitative Methods in Project Management


    Quantitative analysis techniques in project management. Introduction to quantitative decisions making, decision tree, simulation, linear programming, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, etc.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or senior standing in major.
  
  • CEM 470 - Construction Automation


    Automation applications, robotics, and analysis for construction, including, alignment, materials handling, and installation units. Location analysis from project site to fabrication shop. Repeatability and training considerations. Environmental influences.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 480 - Sustainable Construction


    Overview of sustainable design and construction. Introduction to green buildings, LEED assessment process, high-performance building, and green building material. Economic analysis of green buildings.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Laboratory science course, consent of instructor.
  
  • CEM 482 - Hazardous Waste Construction Operations


    Construction operations for hazardous waste sites and site remediation. On-site control techniques. Off-site disposal. Equipment and methods issues. Personnel protection and training.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 484 - Construction Site Water Management


    Formerly Listed as CEM 460

    Management of water at construction sites.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 485 - Construction Law and Contracts


    Legal problems in the construction process. Stipulated sum, unit price, and cost-plus contracts. Construction lien rights and bond rights. Scope of work issues. Builders risk issues. Risk-shifting. Case studies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CEM 493 - Independent Study


    Independent study of a selected construction topic.

    Credits 1-3
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CEM 495 - Special Topics in Construction Management


    Experimental and other topics which may be of current interest in construction management.

    Credits 1-4
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits.
    Notes Topics and credits to be announced.
  
  • CFA 100 - First Year Symposia


    Revolutions: Culture confronts Counter-culture in the 1960s
    Through exploration of the eruptive and evocative new forms of Art, Architecture, Film, Theatre and Dance through the turbulent 1960s, the course examines the ethical and multi-cultural collision of the establishment and anti-establishment values and how these movements continue to inform and influence the various disciplines comprising the Fine Arts today.
     

    Credits 2
  
  • CFA 101 - Introduction to Environmental Design


    This survey focuses on historical, theoretical, social, technical, and environmental forces that shape the design professions. Especially for majors and non-majors who wish to explore this field as a career choice.

    Credits 3
  
  • CFA 103 - Survey of Dance


    In depth studies in dance and related topics. This course is designed to foster the individuals understanding of academia and the learning strategies and study skills that emphasize critical and divergent thinking, inquiry and creativity. Through a series of global topics; social awareness and political tolerance will be encouraged. The course embraces artistic, cultural, intellectual, ethical and spiritual differences through mutual respect, research, discussion and presentations. These will include the importance of diversity and inclusivity. Further; students will be provided insight into the institution’s academic offerings and the role that dance offers in societies around the world.

    Credits 3
  
  • CHEM 103 - Preparatory Chemistry


    For students with a deficiency in high school chemistry who wish to qualify for  .

    Credits 3
    Corequisites Enrollment in   or placement in   or higher.
    Notes Credit not allowed in both CHEM 103 and  . Does not satisfy the General Education Core Science requirement.
  
  • CHEM 105 - Chemistry, Man, and Society


    Introduction to chemistry, intended to develop an understanding of basic principles, and an appreciation of both the benefits and risks resulting from application of these principles in science and technology. May be used in partial fulfillment of the General Education Core Science requirement.

    Credits 3
    Notes Credit not allowed in both CHEM 105 and  .
  
  • CHEM 106 - Beginning Chemistry Laboratory


    Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate material discussed in CHEM 105. May be used in partial fulfillment of the General Education Core requirement.

    Credits 1
    Notes Must be concurrently enrolled in  .
  
  • CHEM 108 - Introduction to Chemistry


    Survey of elementary principles of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry, and their applications to living systems. For non-science majors and students majoring in nursing and allied health. Prerequisites: High School Chemistry or Permission of Instructor.

    Credits 4
    Notes Does not satisfy the General Education Core Science requirement.
  
  • CHEM 110 - Chemistry for the Health Sciences I


    Survey of elementary principles of general chemistry and their applications to living systems. For students in programs such as nursing and allied health.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   or placement in   or higher.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
    Notes Credit not allowed in both   and 110.
  
  • CHEM 111 - Chemistry for the Health Sciences II


    Survey of elementary principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry. For students majoring in nursing and allied health.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
    Notes Credit not allowed in both CHEM 111 and  .
  
  • CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I


    Fundamental principles of chemistry and their correlation with the properties of the elements.

    Credits 4
    Corequisites   or   or higher.
    Prerequisites A passing score on the Chemistry Placement Exam or a grade of C or better in  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II


    Application of chemical principles to properties of inorganic substances. Includes principles and techniques of qualitative analysis, with special emphasis on applications of chemical equilibria.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites  , and   or   or higher.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • CHEM 123 - Qualitative Analysis Laboratory


    Laboratory portion of  . Open only to students with scores of four or five on the Chemistry Advanced Placement Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. Satisfies CHEM 121-122 for these students.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites A score of four or five on the Advanced Placement Test in Chemistry.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours One hour lecture and three hours laboratory
  
  • CHEM 190 - Freshman Independent Study in Chemistry


    Introduction to research in a chemistry lab. Students work under close supervision of a faculty member to develop research skills.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites   or a score of three or better on the AP Chemistry Exam; consent of faculty member directing the research prior to registration.
    May be repeated to a maximum of three credits.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours May include library research and laboratory work.
  
  • CHEM 220 - Introductory Organic Chemistry


    Introduction to the properties of organic functional groups and to elementary laboratory techniques.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
    Notes Credit toward meeting chemistry program requirements not allowed in both CHEM 220 and  .
  
  • CHEM 241 - Organic Chemistry I


    Intensive introduction to the theory of carbon chemistry with particular emphasis on understanding the relationship between the structure and behavior of organic molecules. Credit toward meeting chemistry program requirements not allowed in both   and CHEM 241.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes Students are limited to two (2) registrations for this course regardless of first registration status (grade, drop, withdraw or audit). Students can only enroll in this course through the Chemistry Department Office.
  
  • CHEM 241L - Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences Lab I


    Laboratory exercises in introductory organic chemistry. Stereochemistry, separation and purification techniques, micro-scale organic reaction procedures.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 242 - Organic Chemistry II


    Continuation of   with emphasis on complex reactions and mechanisms, and introduction to advanced approaches for the synthesis of organic molecules. Credit not allowed in both   and CHEM 241-242.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 242L - Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences Laboratory II


    Laboratory exercises in intermediate organic chemistry with continued emphasis on micro-scale organic reaction procedures. Introduction to the identification of organic compounds using chemical and instrumental means (qualitative analysis).

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 302 - Chemistry Demonstrations for Science Teachers


    Provides an opportunity for science teachers to perform practical chemistry demonstrations and to review fundamental chemical principles. These demonstrations suitable for incorporation into the physical, biological, and earth science curricula.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor and either a teaching certificate or bachelor’s degree.
  
  • CHEM 312 - Introduction to Radiochemistry


    Introduction to the fundamental principles of radiation science for radiochemists. Introduction to radioactivity, interaction of radiation with matter, and effects of radiation on biological systems. Discussion and overview of practical applications of radiochemistry, including nuclear medicine, radiochemical techniques, nuclear chemical engineering, and radioactive waste management.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  .
  
  • CHEM 347 - Laboratory Techniques of Organic Chemistry I


    Laboratory exercises in introductory organic chemistry for chemistry majors. Stereochemistry, separation and purification techniques, macro-scale organic reaction procedures.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 348 - Laboratory Techniques of Organic Chemistry II


    Laboratory exercises in intermediate organic chemistry with continued emphasis on macro-scale reaction procedures. Introduction to advanced purification, separation, qualitative analysis, and spectroscopic techniques.

    Credits 2
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 355 - Quantitative Analysis


    Theory and techniques of quantitative analysis, particularly gravimetric, titrimetric, complexometric, peotentiometric, and colorimetric methods. Standard chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques also covered. Emphasis upon chemical calculations and equilibrium considerations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   plus either   or  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture.
    Notes Students are limited to two (2) registrations for this course regardless of first registration status (grade, drop, withdraw or audit). Students can only enroll in this course through the Chemistry Department Office.
  
  • CHEM 355L - Quantitative Analysis Laboratory


    Laboratory stressing the application and techniques of quantitative analysis, particularly gravimetric, titrimetric, complexometric, potentiometric, and calorimetric methods. Standard chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques also covered. Emphasis upon chemical calculations and equilibrium considerations as applied to chemical analysis.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites  ; or   plus either   or  ; and concurrent enrollment in  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Six hour laboratory.
    Notes Students must be concurrently enrolled in  .
  
  • CHEM 402 - Scientific Software for the Microcomputer


    Use of computer software for graphing, statistics, structure drawing, information retrieval, word processing, and self-paced learning.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 421 - Physical Chemistry I


    Thermodynamics, solution behavior, and equilibrium.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and   or concurrent registration in   and  .
  
  • CHEM 422 - Physical Chemistry II


    Kinetic theory, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, introductory quantum chemistry, and states of matter.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 423 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory


    Introduction to basic physicochemical laboratory techniques and their use in elucidating chemical theory.

    Credits 2
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes CHEM 423 and   may not be taken concurrently.
  
  • CHEM 428 - Quantum Chemistry


    Introduction to quantum mechanics and molecular orbital theory as related to bonding, spectra, and reactivity. Includes an introduction to computerized electronic structure calculations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites    and   or  .
  
  • CHEM 431 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry


    Atomic and molecular structure: acid-base theory; periodic relationships and organometallic chemistry.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 442 - Advanced Organic Chemistry


    Builds on the background of the one-year organic chemistry course. Emphasizes advanced concepts of reactivity, single-step and multistep transformations, important named reactions, as well as mechanistic and functional group approaches to synthesis.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 447 - Advanced Synthesis Laboratory


    Preparation, purification, and characterization of organic and inorganic compounds.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Six hours laboratory.
  
  • CHEM 455 - Instrumental Analysis


    Fundamental laws and principles of instrumental determinations, including spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, electrochemical methods, and thermal analysis as main areas of study.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites   and  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture.
  
  • CHEM 455L - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory


    Laboratory stressing the application and techniques of instrumental analysis including spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, electrochemical methods, and thermal analysis and the use of these methods in chemical analysis.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites    and concurrent enrollment in  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Two credit, six hours laboratory.
  
  • CHEM 472 - Biochemistry Laboratory


    Introduction to analytical techniques of biochemistry as tools to study cellular components. Techniques may include centrifugation, spectrophotometry, chromatography, and electrophoresis.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites  , Biochemistry major.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Six hours laboratory.
  
  • CHEM 474 - Biochemistry I


    Fundamentals of biochemistry with emphasis on the structure-function relationships of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids; bioenergetics; and intermediary metabolism and the mechanisms of its regulation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 475 - Biochemistry II


    Continuation of   with emphasis on anabolic and catabolic pathways; gene replication and expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; recombinant DNA; and various aspects of physiological chemistry.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CHEM 476 - Advanced Topics in Biochemistry


    In-depth study of selected topics of current and general interest in biochemistry. Topics may include enzymes, nucleic acids, metabolism, molecular genetics, neurochemistry, toxicology, and human biochemistry.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  . 2-3 credits
  
  • CHEM 478 - Endocrinology


    (Same as BIOL 414 .) Survey of the structure and function of vertebrate endocrine systems, with emphasis on the biochemical basis of hormone action and the role of cell communication in endocrine physiology.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   recommended.
  
  • CHEM 489 - Senior Poster Seminar


    Topics of current research in all fields of chemistry, matters of professional concern. Includes presentation of a poster seminar on a selected topic.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites    ,  ,  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of two credits.
  
  • CHEM 490 - Senior Independent Study in Chemistry


    Modest research projects for students working toward the Bachelor of Arts degree and demonstrating aptitude for independent work.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites No more than three credits of CHEM 490 may be applied toward a chemistry degree. Consent of the faculty member directing the project must be obtained prior to registration.
    May be repeated once.
  
  • CHEM 491 - Senior Seminar in Chemistry


    Includes oral presentations of topics of current research in any field of chemistry. Only required for BS Chemistry, but recommended as an elective for any student interested in graduate school. Students in other Chemistry degree programs should take   instead.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites  ,  , and  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of two credits.
  
  • CHEM 492 - Advanced Topics in Chemistry


    Selected topics from the various disciplines of chemistry not covered by any other course offerings and of current interest to students and faculty.

    Credits (1-2)
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.
  
  • CHEM 493 - Senior Research in Chemistry I


    Individual laboratory projects drawn from any field of chemistry. Preliminary library work, equipment acquisition, and apparatus assembly and initiation of laboratory work as time allows.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
    Prerequisites (Consent of the faculty member directing the project must be obtained prior to registration.) For students in the general B.S. in Chemistry program, prerequisites are  ,  ,  , and  . For students in the Biochemistry B.S. program, prerequisites are  ,  , and  ;
    May be repeated to a maximum of two credits.
  
  • CHEM 494 - Senior Research in Chemistry II


    Continuation of  . Intensive experimental work.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.
  
  • CHI 105 - Chinese Business Culture


    Introduction to the cultural and linguistic knowledge needed to conduct business in China. Topics covered include business etiquette, business environment in China, current economic and political situation in China. Basic communication skills also covered.

    Credits 3
    Notes Taught in English.
  
  • CHI 113 - Elementary Chinese I


    Development of language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
  
  • CHI 114 - Elementary Chinese II


    Development of language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • CHI 187 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture I


    Elementary course work in Chinese language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    May be repeated for a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • CHI 213 - Intermediate Chinese I


    Structural review, conversation, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • CHI 214 - Intermediate Chinese II


    Structural review, conversation, reading, and writing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
  
  • CHI 287 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture II


    Intermediate course work in Chinese language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    May be repeated for a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • CHI 301 - Third-Year Chinese: Conversation and Composition


    Intensive practice in oral Chinese. Topics for conversations are drawn from newspaper articles and other media sources on social-cultural issues in China. Develops ability to comprehend Chinese used in various contexts, to write short essays, and to discuss subject-oriented issue.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CHI 302 - Third-Year Chinese: Grammar and Composition


    Review of grammar and development of writing skills in Chinese. Develops ability to write narrative, descriptive, and expository writings in Chinese.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or equivalent.
 

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