Jun 14, 2024  
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Courses


 
  
  • CHI 322 - Modern Chinese Literature in Translation


    Study of the poems, short stories, and essays by modern Chinese writers. Literary texts woven together with critical texts and occasional films. Explores how works of literature illuminate some of the most significant aspects of modern Chinese society.

    Credits 3
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CHI 323 - Chinese Popular Culture


    Introduction to contemporary Chinese culture and society. Focuses on popular literature, contemporary Chinese cinema, soap operas, political pop in the arts, pop music, and Internet literature in China. Taught in English.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Nine credits of English composition and literature.
  
  • CHI 331 - Chinese Literature in Translation


    Major works of Chinese fiction, drama, and poetry from the classical period to the present.

    Credits 3
  
  • CHI 350 - Topics in Chinese Literature


    Study of the poems, short stories, and essays written by Chinese authors. Through the reading of critical texts, explores how works of literature illuminate some of the most significant aspects of Chinese society.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CHI 387 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture III


    Advanced course work in Chinese language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated for a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • CHI 443 - Modern Chinese Culture Through Film


    Study of modern Chinese culture from both historical and critical perspectives through selected Chinese films. The primary focus is on the Mainland China but students will also be introduced to Hong Kong, Taiwan, diaspora and transnational Chinese cultures.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,   and   or  .
    Notes Taught in English.
  
  • CHI 487 - Study Abroad in Foreign Language, Literature, or Culture IV


    Senior-level course work in Chinese language, literature, or culture. Offered through the Office of International Programs.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated for a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • CLA 100 - First Year Seminar


    This course will introduce students to university life and the University Undergraduate Learning Outcomes by exploring a specific topic area and discussing the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed as an undergraduate. The topic area will vary by section. See section notes for description of the content of each section.

    Credits 3
  
  • CLA 309 - Independent Readings in the Classical Languages


    Independent study taken under the supervision of a faculty member. Course

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites 12 credits of course work in Classical Studies and consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CLA 450 - Classical Drama in Translation


    (Same as  .) Study of major Greek and Latin playwrights.

    Credits 3
  
  • CLS 350 - Urinalysis and Body Fluid Analysis


    Study of renal physiology and pathologies manifested in body fluids, such as urine, CSF, and synovial fluid. Case studies demonstrate clinical significance of body fluid analysis in the diagnosis of disease.

    Credits (1-2)
    Prerequisites    or  .
  
  • CLS 351 - Urinalysis and Body Fluid Analysis Laboratory


    Analysis of constituents of urine and other body fluids with emphasis on chemical, macroscopic, and microscopic methodologies used in the diagnosis of disease.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 352 - Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science and Safety


    Introduction to the role of clinical laboratory scientist in health care delivery systems. Laboratory safety issues with emphasis on the practice of CDC universal precaution guidelines. Application of basic educational methods for laboratory personnel.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites Admission to the CLS program.
  
  • CLS 353 - Laboratory Operations I


    Examination and correlation of laboratory data through multi-disciplinary case study approach to patient care. Includes issues of patient confidentiality, professional ethics, and fundamental laboratory calculations.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CLS 399 - Independent Study I


    Individualized clinical instruction in any area of clinical laboratory sciences after completing CLS 300-level courses.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites Junior status in the CLS major. Consent of instructor and program director.
    May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits.
  
  • CLS 402 - Principles of Laboratory Specimen Collection and Processing


    Specimen collection and processing for medical diagnoses including: hospital and laboratory organizational structures; safety; infection control; patient rights; professionalism; medical terminology; cardiovascular system; POCT, CLIA waived testing: glucose, coag, Hct, slide prep, UA, ESR, Troponin, Preg. and Occ Bld. Emphasis on patient care, interpretation and problem solving.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Includes laboratory.
  
  • CLS 403 - Specimen Collection Clinical Practicum


    Supervised clinical practicum experience to develop competencies in laboratory equipment, specimen collection, processing and direct testing. Including: blood (arterial, venipuncture, capillary), non-blood, timed, chain-of-custody samples; POCT and CLIA waived testing (glucose, Coag, Hct, slide prep, UA, ESR, Troponin, Pregs, Occ Bld). Emphasis on patient management and problem solving.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • CLS 404 - Laboratory and Hospital Safety


    Laboratory and hospital safety issues with emphasis on practice of universal precaution guidelines and HIPPA regulations. Topics include: MSDS; chemical storage, handling, and labeling; fire safety; infection control and isolation techniques; spill containment; safety equipment and personal protective attire; OSHA requirements and CDC recommendations, patient rights and confidentiality.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites    or  .
  
  • CLS 412 - Clinical Immunology


    Principles of immunology and the immune response as applied to states of health and disease, immune function and pathology. Topics include antibodies and other antigen receptors, antigens, cell-cell communications, major histocompatibility complex interactions, effector mechanisms, immune regulation, hypersensitivity reactions, immunoproliferative and immuno deficiency disease, transplantation immunology, and cancer mechanisms.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  ,  .
  
  • CLS 413 - Clinical Immunology Laboratory


    Immunologic and molecular techniques used to analyze antigen-antibody reactions in the diagnosis of health or disease. Including liquid and gel precipitation; direct agglutination, and hemagglutination; secondary indicator systems (RIA, ELISA, FA); bacterial and viral serology, Western Blot, DNA, fingerpainting, PCR, nucleic acid probes, flow cytometry and cellular analyses.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 414 - Transfusion Medicine Immunohematology


    Transfusion medicine stresses practical and theoretical aspects of the immunology of tissue antigens and blood group systems. Including ABO discrepancies, transfusion and compatibility testing, adverse reactions to transfusion, hemolytic disease of the newborn, hemotherapy, apheresis, immunomodulation, stem cell transplantation, donor selection and preparation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CLS 415 - Transfusion Medicine Immunohematology Laboratory


    Simulated clinical immunohematology laboratory designed to expose the student to the clinical practice of a modern blood bank service. Applied experiences in basic and advanced clinical testing related to common blood group antigens and their associated antibodies, compatibility testing, alloantibody identification, adsorptions/elutions, transfusion reactions and pre/postnatal studies.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 422 - Clinical Hematology I


    Basic and diagnostic hematology with an emphasis on pathophysiology. Hematopoiesis, anemias, and hemostasis presented through lectures, case studies and morphologic review of peripheral blood and bone marrow smears. Differential diagnosis of these disorders through specified diagnostic laboratory tests.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or   or  ,  .
  
  • CLS 423 - Clinical Hematology I Laboratory


    Basic and diagnostic hematology with an emphasis on the laboratory tests used to differentially diagnose various hematologic disorders. Major emphasis on the various anemias and primary hemostatic bleeding disorders. Laboratory unknowns and peripheral/bone marrow microscopic slides used to correlate clinical tests and theoretical principles.

    Credits 2
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 424 - Clinical Hematology II


    Diagnostic hematology and body fluid analysis with emphasis on pathphysiology. Myeloproliferative, lymphoproliferative, myelodysplastic, acute and chronic leukemias and advanced topics in hemostasis presented through lectures, case studies and morphologic review of peripheral blood and bone marrow slides. Differential diagnosis of these disorders through specified laboratory tests.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CLS 425 - Clinical Hematology II Laboratory


    Diagnostic hematology and body fluid analysis with an emphasis on the laboratory tests, cytochemical stains, and molecular markers used to differently diagnose the various hematologic malignancies and hemostasis disorders. Laboratory unknowns and peripheral/bone marrow microscopic slides used to correlate clinical tests and theoretic principles.

    Credits 2
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 432 - Clinical Microbiology I


    Introduction to medically significant microbial diseases of man. Microbial physiology and pathogenic interactions between man and microorganism. Epidemiology, triage, and diagnosis of microorganisms causing human diseases. Emphasis is on aerobic and anaerobic bacterial diseases, mycobacteria, vibrios, Legionella, Mycoplasma, spirochetes, Rickettsia and Chlamydia. Includes discussion of antimicrobial therapy and resistance mechanisms.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  ,  ,  .
  
  • CLS 433 - Clinical Microbiology Laboratory I


    Introduction to isolation, diagnostic and identification techniques for microbial diseases of humans. Emphasis is on aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, mycobacteria, vibrios, Legionella, Mycoplasma, spriochetes, Rickettsia and Chlamydia. Includes conventional microscopic, culture, molecular and immunological techniques as well as susceptibility testing methods.

    Credits 2
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 434 - Clinical Microbiology II


    Advanced medical microbiology. Microbial physiology and pathogenic interactions between man and microorganism. Epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of microrganisms causing human diseases. Emphasis is on fungal, parasitic and viral diseases as well as miscellaneous bacteria from various body sites. Includes discussion of antimicrobial therapy and resistance mechanisms.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CLS 435 - Clinical Microbiology Laboratory II


    Advanced practical applications in the recovery, isolation and identification of microorganisms causing human disease. Emphasis is on methods for mycology, parasitology, and virology as well as miscellaneous bacteria from different body sites. Includes conventional microscopic, culture, molecular and immunological techniques as well as susceptibility testing methods.

    Credits 2
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 442 - Clinical Chemistry I


    Chemical analysis indicative of human health and disease. Theory and utilization of biochemical instrumentation including photometry, electrochemical, and electrophoresis. Emphasis placed on method application to analysis of carbohydrates, proteins, electrolytes, liver and pancreatic function.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites  , and  .
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • CLS 443 - Clinical Chemistry Laboratory I


    Manual and automated chemical methods used to measure normal and abnormal constituents, such as glucose, electrolytes, and proteins, in blood and body fluids. Use of spectrophotometric techniques, recognition of technical problems and selected abnormalities discussed.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 444 - Clinical Chemistry II


    Advanced study of chemical analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids in normal and abnormal physiological conditions. Emphasizes interdependency, physiological conditions affecting test results and clinical significance. Topics include endocrinology, toxicology, and radioimmunoassay.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CLS 445 - Clinical Chemistry Laboratory II


    Advanced laboratory applications in chemical analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids in normal and abnormal physiological conditions. Emphasizes interdependency, physiological conditions affecting test results and clinical significance. Topics include endocrinology, toxicology and radioimmunoassay.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • CLS 452 - Laboratory Operations II


    Theory and practice of fiscal/personnel management of laboratory practitioners. Introduction to basic research skills in CLS as well as test development and implementation. Includes laboratory information systems, legal aspects of test reporting, and government regulatory and accreditation policies.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CLS 453 - Senior Seminar in Clinical Laboratory Sciences


    Discussion of topics in current clinical laboratory pathology. Individual and group projects used to reinforce concepts for interpretation and correlation of laboratory data to patient care. Includes student presentation or oral and written papers.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CLS 481 - Clinical Practicum in Hematology and Body Fluids


    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of hematology and body fluids. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level cometencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  .
  
  • CLS 482 - Clinical Practicum in Chemistry/Immunology/Urinalysis


    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the areas of chemistry, immunology, and urinalysis. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  ,  .
  
  • CLS 483 - Clinical Practicum in Immunohematology


    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of immunohematology. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CLS 484 - Clinical Practicum in Microbiology


    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of clinical microbiology, parasitology, and mycology. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CLS 485 - Advanced Clinical Practicum


    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experience in the area of toxicology, flow cytometry, and molecular diagnostics. Clinical practicum in specified affiliated laboratories designed to provide exposure to the student in the specialty areas listed. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  ,  ,  ,  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CLS 492 - Research Methods and Design


    Student experience in faculty-directed research projects. Fundamentals of biomedical research design, testing methods, literature review and analysis, scientific integrity, appropriate citation methods, human and animal subjects’ rights, hypothesis testing, validity testing, and statistical data analysis. Applied research design resulting in professional presentation.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites  , permission of program director.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CLS 494 - Undergraduate Teaching Assistant in CLS


    Introduction to the principles of laboratory teaching in the sciences. Topics include academic integrity, cultural implications for the science classroom, role of a teacher, and development of a lesson (goals, objectives, as well as rubrics and test questions) according to NAACLS Standards. Participation in laboratory lesson preparation and instruction.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  , or   and permission of program director.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • CLS 499 - Independent Study II


    Individualized study and/or research.

    Credits (1-4)
    Prerequisites Senior status and consent of department chairperson and instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits.
  
  • CMI 330 - Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging


    Utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the medical environment. Topics include the physics of MRI, patient care, and safety. Includes site visits.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • CMI 331 - Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging


    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its application in medical diagnostic imaging. Emphasis on imaging procedures, data acquisition and processing, quality control/management, gating, MRA, and spectroscopy.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CMI 332 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pathology


    Study of magnetic resonance imaging pathology used with the majority of pulse sequences. Emphasis on the investigation of metastatic and benign tumors as well as structural anomalies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CMI 350 - Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation


    Principles of acoustical physics, Doppler ultrasound, and ultrasound instrumentation.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • CMI 351 - Abdominal Ultrasound


    Recognition and identification of the sonographic appearance of normal anatomical structures, disease processes, pathology, and pathophysiology of the abdomen.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • CMI 352 - Obstetric Ultrasound


    Recognition and identification of the sonographic appearance of normal maternal, embryonic, and fetal anatomical structures and obstetric disease processes, pathology, and pathophysiology.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • CMI 353 - Gynecologic Ultrasound


    Recognition and identification of the sonographic appearance of normal anatomical structures of the female pelvis and gynecological disease processes, pathology, and pathophysiology.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • CMI 354 - Vascular Ultrasound


    Recognition and identification of the sonographic appearance of normal appearance of normal anatomical structures, disease processes, pathology, pathophysiology and hemodynamics of the peripheral vascular system and carotid arteries.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • CMI 355 - Ultrasound Practicum


    To recognize and utilize the functions of Ultrasound equipment and demonstrate knowledge of Ultrasound scanning protocols when performing scans on patients.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • CMI 360 - Principles of Computed Tomography


    Study of physics, techniques, and procedures that produce radiographic images of human structures using computed tomography.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • CMI 361 - Computed Tomography Pathology


    Trauma, body, and skeletal pathology as viewed by computed tomography (CT) investigated. New applications such as quantitative CT, spiral scanning, and CT angiography addressed.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CMI 376 - Sectional Anatomy in Medical Imaging


    Transverse, coronal, and sagittal anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. Areas of discussion include: skeletal, muscular, circulatory, nervous, lymphatic, and visceral anatomic relationships.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • CMI 479 - Advanced Topics and Management


    Examination of recent trends, research, and technological advances in medical imaging and the health care environment. Various administrative aspects of a medical imaging facility. Explores the humanistic, ethical, legal, and professional considerations of medical care.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Formal admission to the CMI or NUC program, CMI 310.
  
  • CMI 481 - Digital Data Management


    Processing and management of digital data obtained from medical diagnostic equipment. Topics include spacial imaging domains, k-space mapping and filling, Fourier transformation, maximum intensity projection, multiplanar and 3-D reconstruction, and quality assurance/management.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  .
  
  • CMI 485 - Imaging Case Reviews


    Comprehensive case review of diagnostic imaging studies from multiple modalities. Presentations focus on individual case histories, techniques, pathology, and review of current literature.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of two credits.
  
  • CMI 490 - Comprehensive Medical Imaging Clinical Education


    Clinical applications of instrumentation, quality control, patient care, and performance of diagnostic imaging procedures.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Consent of department.
    May be repeated to a maximum of 15 credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • COE 102 - First Year Seminar


    Prepares students with skills and knowledge to promote academic success and retention. Major areas of focus include: inquiry and critical thinking skills, communication, global/multicultural awareness, intellectual and life-long learning perspectives, and citizenship and ethics. Anticipated outcomes are: connections with faculty and peers, overall college engagement, and improvement in academic skills.

    Credits 2
  
  • COLA 100 - First Year Seminar


    This course will introduce students to university life and the University Undergraduate Learning Outcomes by exploring a specific topic area and the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed as an undergraduate. The topic area will vary by section. See section notes for description of the content of each section.

    Credits 3
  
  • COLA 100E - First Year Seminar: Exploring Majors


    This course introduces students to university life and the University Undergraduate Learning Outcomes by exploring the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed as an undergraduate. Designed for exploring (undeclared) majors to increase their awareness of their roles within their respective communities while exposing them to learning strategies and critical thinking.

    Credits 3
  
  • COM 101 - Oral Communication


    Theory and performance work in extemporaneous speaking and related speaking experiences. Emphasis placed on developing skills necessary for effective public speaking.

    Credits 3
  
  • COM 102 - Introduction to Interpersonal Communication


    Examination of theories of effective interpersonal communication with in-class exercises designed to provide practical application of theory.

    Credits 3
  
  • COM 105 - Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Consent of forensics administrator.
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Freshman standing required.
  
  • COM 106 - Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Freshman standing required.
  
  • COM 116 - Critical Reasoning in Daily Life


    Formerly Listed as COM 115.

    Theory and practice of critical reasoning applied to a varied of everyday communicational forms, including arguments, narratives, advertisements, films, protests, performances, and public spaces.

    Credits 3
  
  • COM 205 - Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Sophomore standing required.
  
  • COM 206 - Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Sophomore standing required.
  
  • COM 211 - Survey of Rhetorical Studies


    Survey of historical development of various rhetorical canons, concepts, and perspectives, beginning with ancient Greek and Roman discourse and concluding with contemporary rhetoric.

    Credits 3
  
  • COM 216 - Survey of Communication Studies


    Analysis of the contexts, principles, and values of human communication grounded in communication theory. Focuses on developing competency in the areas of intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, and public communication.

    Credits 3
  
  • COM 217 - Argumentation and Debate


    Study of the principles of argument analysis, critical thinking, evaluation and construction; inductive and deductive reasoning; and forms of support and fallacies of argument and language. Study of the principles of organizing and writing argumentative essays.

    Credits 3
  
  • COM 302 - Issues in Interpersonal Communication


    Examination of the variables involved in interpersonal communication relationships. Provides students with opportunities to examine their own communication behavior as it affects others.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • COM 305 - Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Junior standing required.
  
  • COM 306 - Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Junior standing required.
  
  • COM 310 - Contemporary Rhetorical Theory


    Survey of major issues, themes, and problems in rhetorical theory over the past half century. Weekly topics range from Public Truths (morality, ideology) to Public Selves (identities, bodies, others) to Public Spaces (mediated, material, mundane) to Public Style (aesthetics, politics, change).

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • COM 312 - Nonverbal Communication


    Study of basic theory, concepts and analysis of nonverbal communication. Investigation of nonverbal cues (e.g., body language, space, eye contact, etc.) and their social functions.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • COM 314 - Health Communication


    Examination of health communication theory, perspectives, and research in a variety of contexts.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  , and  .
  
  • COM 315 - Small Group Communication


    Principles of small group communication and problem solving; theory and practice.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • COM 317 - Organizational Communication


    Examination of organizational communication from a general systems perspective. Emphasis on the flow of messages as they affect the structure and function of an organization.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • COM 330 - Selected Topics in Communication Studies


    Study of a specific topic related to communication studies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • COM 400 - Human Communication Theory


    Reviews, compares, and applies contemporary behavioral theories of communication. Focus is upon interpersonal, cognitive, and influence theories as they apply to communication processes.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 401 - Rhetoric of Women’s Rights


    (Same as  .) Examination of the rhetorical campaign for woman suffrage and women’s rights from the early nineteenth century up to passage of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. Emphasis on identifying, understanding, and evaluating major rhetorical strategies in their historical context.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 403 - Public Communication


    Examination of public communication in terms of form, context, people, messages, and delivery. Particular focus on the ethics of public communication.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 404 - Principles of Persuasion


    Examination of the principles involved in influencing groups and individuals.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and junior standing.
  
  • COM 405 - Intercollegiate Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  , consent of forensics administrator, and junior or senior standing.
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Senior standing required.
  
  • COM 406 - Intercollegiate Debate and Forensics


    Participation in intercollegiate debate and individual events as a member of the university debate squad, plus participation in related on-campus events.

    Credits 3
    Notes Does not fulfill requirements for a major in speech communication. Senior standing required.
  
  • COM 407 - Communication Between the Sexes


    (Same as  .) Introduction to gender research in communication, studying ways in which language, interpersonal communication, the media, and various social institutions influence conceptions of gender.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 408 - Rhetorical Criticism


    Investigation and analysis of public discourse. Students introduced to a variety of critical methodologies used to analyze public messages.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 409 - The Rhetorical Tradition


    Historical and critical evaluation of western rhetorical theory from the classical era to the contemporary period. Examines communication’s humanistic traditions on such issues as civic discourse, public advocacy, social interaction, message analysis, and political culture.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 410 - Advanced Topics in Relational Communication


    This course will examine contemporary topics and processes relevant to communication in personal relationships. To improve understanding of the communication process and its implications for the development, maintenance, and termination of close, personal relationships, current theory and research will be incorporated. The course will enhance critical thinking and analytical skills.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  ,  .
  
  • COM 412 - Intercultural Communication


    (Fulfills Multicultural Requirement), Understanding the relationship between communication and culture through the study of cultural variables (languages, traditions, rituals, roles/norms, values, etc.) and how this relationship impacts identity, behavior, expectations and knowledge.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 413 - Argumentation


    Study of basic principles of argumentation, the preparation and presentation of argumentative speeches.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 414 - Famous Speeches


    Study of the role of public address in American history. Emphasis on speeches which had a significant effect on American history.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

  
  • COM 415 - Communication in Marital and Family Relationships


    Introduces students to communication processes that occur in the context of marital and family relationships. We will examine definitions of the family, the roles of family members, various types of families that comprise modern society, and a number of current issues that affect families.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and junior standing.
  
  • COM 434 - Communication and Conflict Resolution


    Formerly Listed as COM 416

    Examination of various types and sources of conflict in interpersonal relationships, the management and resolution of these conflicts through various decision-making models. Practical application of theory emphasized in various classroom exercises.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • COM 435 - Quantitative Research Methods


    Survey of empirical research methods in communication including laboratory, field, and survey methods and their applications.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • COM 441 - Rhetoric of Dissent


    Formerly Listed as COM 307

    Description and analysis of public discourse by agitators and those opposed to agitation. Focus on significant movements for change in recent American history.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and junior standing.
  
  • COM 464 - Leadership: A Communication Perspective


    Useful theories and practical experiences to make better leaders. Studies specific leaders, their philosophy of leadership, their ethics and effectiveness. Includes interviewing leaders both in the community and nationally.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  

    .

 

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