May 19, 2024  
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Courses


 
  
  • HMD 302 - Franchising


    Examination of the multifaceted phenomenon of franchising in the hospitality industry, with particular attention to site study, financing, marketing, and operations.

    Credits 3
  
  • HMD 307 - Hospitality Leadership, Management, & Ethics


    This course will develop student skills necessary to lead and manage hospitality organizations in an ethically, environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable way. It will include analysis of organizational work environments, critical situations, problem solving and decision implementation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,    or higher.
  
  • HMD 315 - Ethics for the Hospitality Industry


    Develops awareness and understanding of ethical considerations in decision making peculiar to the hospitality industry. Focuses on nuances of this labor-intensive service industry using organizational values as foundation for ethical behavior. Explores the potential for a legal-ethical dichotomy.

    Credits 3
  
  • HMD 320 - Working with Diversity


    Offers improved understanding and ability to effectively manage a diverse hospitality/service industry workforce. Dimensions of diversity presented and discussed from historical, psychological, and sociological perspectives to provide a depth of understanding and appreciation of difference and its impact on society and work.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • HMD 340 - Timeshare and Vacation Ownership Resorts


    Examination of the skills and techniques required for planning, development, marketing and sales of timeshare and vacation ownership industry resorts.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • HMD 366 - Executive Speakers Series


    This lecture series explores the potential for employment within a particular industry segment and discusses these opportunities with the hospitality executives.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites  .
    May be repeated to a maximum of three credits
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • HMD 376 - Special Topics in Hotel Administration


    Series of special courses designed by faculty from academe and industry. Separate units treat topics in a) Computer operations, b) Casino, c) Human resources, d) Facility management, e) Hotel operations and management, and f) Field experience.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Junior standing.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits; nine on petition.
  
  • HMD 395/395D - Facilities Management


    Explores the engineering and maintenance requirements peculiar to the hospitality industry. Special emphasis on environmental issues, modernization, building operating systems, and resource management. Lab fee required.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites HMD 395D.
    Prerequisites   or  ,   or  ,   or higher.
  
  • HMD 396 - Architecture in Hotel Management


    Team-taught effort illustrating how architecturally appealing hotels can provide maximum profit when managers and architects cooperate early in providing optimum space and labor utilization.

    Credits 3
  
  • HMD 401 - Hospitality Law


    Provides a basic understanding of the primary laws and regulations that apply to the hospitality industry, how to effectively manage the legal issues/liabilities faced by all hospitality managers, and how to avoid and prevent legal liabilities through critical thinking and application.

    Credits 3
      or  ,   or  ,   or higher.
  
  • HMD 402 - Employment Law in the Hospitality Industry


    Covers all significant state and federal laws applicable to employment relationships found in hospitality businesses and studies effective methods of managing hospitality employees in compliance with applicable employment laws. Students learn to effectively identify, evaluate and resolve employment law issues and liabilities commonly encountered by hospitality businesses.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  ,   or  ,   or higher,  .
  
  • HMD 407 - Organizational Behavior Applied to the Service Industries


    Focuses on developing management skills through the study and application of theories of human behavior, particularly in service organizations. Areas addressed include: working with/through others, communication, coaching and counseling, providing feedback, goal setting, stress management, creative problem solving, motivation, power, conflict management, and group dynamics and developing effective teams.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or  ,   or  ,   or higher.
  
  • HMD 408 - Labor-Management Relations


    Analysis of labor-management relations (legal, social, and economic) relationships among employers, labor unions, and employees in the hospitality industry. Development of skills necessary to effectively manage employees who are represented by unions. Areas addressed include: union organization and election processes, labor contract negotiations and administration, labor strikes, dispute resolution, and strategic labor management decision-making

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  , junior standing.
  
  • HMD 410 - Hospitality Security and the Preservation of Assets


    Analysis of contemporary security concerns specific to hospitality and gaming industries; encompassing lodging, food and beverage, clubs, retailing, and medical service. Includes development of security department organizations, fraud analysis, risk management, asset protection, loss prevention, disaster control, crisis communication, industrial safety, casino security liaison, and emergency action planning.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .                      
  
  • HMD 440 - Strategic Planning in Timeshare and Vacation Ownership Industry


    Examination of the skills, tools and techniques needed for successful strategic management of timeshare and vacation ownership industry organizations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HMD 240, HMD 340, senior standing.
  
  • HMD 450 - Hospitality Internship


    Internships that either rotate through various hotel departments or focus on specific areas such as human resources, facility management, and gaming. Seminars and reports required. Lab fee required.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites Minimum UNLV GPA of 2.50 or recommendation of the faculty, and recreation/leisure studies majors only.
    Prerequisites TCA 201.
  
  • HMD 454 - Strategic Management in Hospitality


    Course transforms students into strategic business leaders. Students assume the role of hospitality managers responsible their company’s current and future success. Students acquire in-depth knowledge of strategic management concepts and techniques and develop strategies that enable companies to build and maintain a competitive advantage in a rapidly changing business environment.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  ,   and   or  , senior standing, 2.0 GPA.
  
  • HMD 455 - Hotel Administration Seminar


    Study and discussion of current problems in the hospitality industry using case studies, individual research, and guests.

    Credits 3
  
  • HMD 456 - Employee Development


    Stresses the techniques in planning, developing, and conducting training programs in food service and lodging firms.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  , senior standing.
  
  • HMD 474 - Independent Study in Hotel Management


    Research in an area of concern to the management of hotels and related industries.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • HON 100 H - Honors Rhetoric


    Study and practice of writing at the college level with the primary emphasis on persuasive rhetoric. Requirements include library research paper. Must be completed by the end of the student’s first year in the Honors College.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 102 H - Honors Critical Thinking


    Introduction to analysis and evaluation of arguments, construction of logically sound arguments, and to logic as the theory of argument. Emphasizes arguments of current or general interest.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in Honors College.
  
  • HON 103 H - SAGE Academy Seminar


    Intensive accelerated summer seminar for advanced secondary school students, offering a variety of challenging topics in the humanities and natural sciences. Open only to students admitted to the SAGE Academy. Consult summer schedule for current topics.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Acceptance to UNLV SAGE Academy.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • HON 105 H - Honors Orientation Seminar


    Provides students in the Honors College with information about the college and the university. Major areas of focus are University and Honors College core requirements, campus resources, campus organizations, various college presentations, and study skills. Must be completed during the student’s first semester in the Honors College.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites Enrolled in the Honors College.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • HON 106 H - Introduction to Literary Analysis


    Study of lyric, dramatic, and narrative techniques including metaphor and narrative form and distinctions among the literary kinds. Readings from masterworks of western culture, works in western culture often overlooked, and works from other less often-studied cultures.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 110 H - Perspectives on the Western Experience I


    Survey of Western civilization from its origins in Egypt and Mesopotamia to the beginning of the modern world. Major periods and cultures considered include the Hebrew, Ancient Greek, Roman, Christian, Medieval, Renaissance and Reformation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 111 H - Themes in American Civilization


    Explores a very important question: “How did Americans become what they are in the early twenty-first century?” Traces the development of the American people within the broader framework of western civilization, using an analytical rather than factual approach. Satisfies both the United States and Nevada Constitutions requirements.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 112 H - Exploring American Politics


    Exploration of unique features of the American political system. Particular attention paid to federalism and the role of states in the American polity using theoretical and analytical approaches. Satisfies both the United States and Nevada Constitutions requirements.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 115 H - Perspectives on the Western Experience II


    Survey of Western civilization from the Reformation to the present including: the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the American, French, and Russian Revolutions, nineteenth-century systems of thought, World Wars I and II, fascism, and contemporary issues in art, science, technology, politics and philosophy.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 125 H - Adventures in Data Analysis


    Introduction to the basic terminology and methods of both modern information technology and statistical methods, coupled with detailed examples from campus researchers and community practitioners of statistical applications, typically with reference to the computer technology required to support these analysis.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 140 H - Honors Mathematics I


    Topics include the study of functions at the intermediate level, analytic geometry, matrices, linear programming combinatorics, discrete probability, and other topics with applications. Problem solving emphasized.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College and MAT 127 or equivalent in high school.
  
  • HON 141 H - Honors Mathematics II


    Topics include differential and integral calculus maxima/minima problems, and other applications in probability and differential/difference equations. Problem solving emphasized.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HON 140 H or equivalent.
  
  • HON 181 H - Honors Calculus I


    In-depth coverage of differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions including computational and physical applications.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites MAT 128 or equivalent and admission to the Honors College.
  
  • HON 182 H - Honors Calculus II


    Integration, polynomial approximations, sequences, series, and introduction to differential equations including computational and physical applications.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College and HON 181 H.
  
  • HON 190 H - Honors Introduction to Philosophy


    Study of selected philosophers or basic problems involving imaginative and critical interpretations of experience and reality.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 190A H - Honors Public Speaking


    Theory and performance work in extemporaneous and related persuasive speaking. Emphasis placed on developing critical thinking, research, and performance skills necessary for effective public speaking. Must be completed by the end of the student’s first year in the Honors College.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 200 H - Topics in Social Science


    Variety of honors courses from different disciplines in the social sciences.

    Credits 3
  
  • HON 200A H - Honors General Psychology


    Introduction to psychology including introductory treatment of sensation-perception-cognition, physiological psychology, learning, personality, development, social psychology, abnormal psychology, assessment, psychological interventions, and the history of psychology.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 200B H - Honors Microeconomics


    Considers how prices guide and direct economic activity under both perfect and imperfect competition. Consumer theory, producer theory, management decision making and government policy formulation. Theoretical models and their assumptions. Solving problems using the methodologies developed.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 200C H - Honors Macroeconomics


    Study of the relationships and implications of the level of employment and production, interest rates, inflation rate, government budget deficit and national debt, trade deficit and trade indebtedness, international finance and exchange rates, long-run growth in productivity and living standards, and government policies that affect the macro economy.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 200D H - Individual, Society, and Freedom


    Survey of the major approaches in the social sciences and humanities which deal with the relationship of the individual and the social milieu.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 200E H - Honors Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Survey of the nature of culture with emphasis on the variation in human behavior in contemporary societies, including a review on the alternative theoretical frameworks used to explain and interpret human variation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 210 H - Introduction to Performance


    Meets the general education fine arts requirement. Focuses on the nature of performance in a variety of disciplines in the fine and performing arts, including the visual arts, music, dance, theatre, film, and architecture. Disciplines covered vary from semester to semester.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 230 H - Scientific World View I


    Examination of the scientific world view, including scientific methodologies and paradigms. Emphasis on the origin and development of the physical universe.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours One three-hour laboratory per week or equivalent.
  
  • HON 235 H - Scientific World View II


    Continuation of HON 230 H, with emphasis on the earth and life.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College and HON 230 H.
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours One three-hour laboratory per week or equivalent.
  
  • HON 280 H - The Development of Science


    Historical survey of science, emphasizing major developments leading to the application of mathematics and experimentation to theories about the natural world.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 283 H - Honors Calculus III


    Vectors, vector-valued functions, multivariable calculus, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Introduction to vector analysis (line and surface integrals, Green’s and Stoke’s Theorems, the Jacobian). Computational methods and physical applications emphasized.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College and HON 182 H.
  
  • HON 299 H - Honors Book Forum


    Faculty and students read selected works and interact in small discussion groups.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
    May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits.
  
  • HON 349 H - Lessons in Leadership


    Concepts, theories and case studies concerning the leadership of people in modern organizations as learned from lessons in popular writing, popular cinema, and history. Participation and observation and analyzing of leadership behavior.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
  
  • HON 395 H - Honors Internship


    Students gain off-campus experience designed to familiarize them with different careers. Mentors are chosen from the business, medical, professional, and technical community in Las Vegas. Before registering for this course, students must have a proposal outlining the objectives of the mentorship signed by the mentor and student, and approved by the College.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
    May be repeated to a maximum of three credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • HON 400 H - Special Topics Seminars


    Opportunity for students and faculty to be innovative and explore a wide range of topics not covered by regular honors courses.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the Honors College.
    May be repeated to a maximum of thirty credits with different topics.
  
  • HON 400 IH - Special Topics


    Seminar with a special topic approved to satisfy the UNLV International Requirement.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the honors college.
    May be repeated to a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • HON 400 IM - Special Topics


    Seminar with a special topic approved to satisfy the UNLV Multicultural Requirement.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Good standing in the honors college.
    May be repeated to a maximum of thirty credits.
  
  • HON 493 H - Self-Directed Study


    Students submit a proposal to the Honors College listing tentative readings and outlining the objectives of the self-directed study. They keep a weekly journal and are encouraged to let the focus of the study evolve in response to the earlier readings and discussions with a faculty mentor.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Junior or senior in good standing in the Honors College.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • HON 498 H - Honors Thesis/Project I


    Required senior thesis/project for students in Department Honors. Student works under the supervision of a faculty mentor and must have an approved Proposal For Honors Project form on file with the Honors College before registering.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing in the Honors College.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • HON 499 H - Honors Thesis/Project II


    Required senior thesis/project for students in Department Honors. Student works under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students are required to give a presentation based on their thesis/project to an appropriate audience at UNLV.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Two HON 400 H seminars and HON 498 H.
  
  • HPS 102 - Radiation Science


    (Same as RAD 102.) Principles of radiation science and safety including interactions of radiation with matter, radiation quantities and protection standards, dosimetry, radioactive decay, and biological effects of radiation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites MATH 124.
  
  • HPS 210 - Fundamentals of Radiation Protection Technology


    Radiation protection technology practices and regulations associated with DOE and NRC facilities. Topics include the types, sources and interactions of radiation, radiation surveys and inspections, emergency preparedness, biological effects of radiation, and radiation terminology and units. Calibration and use of radiation detectors and dosimeters also examined.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites MATH 124.
  
  • HPS 300 - Physics of Ionizing Radiation


    Atomic and nuclear structure, basic quantum theory, radioactivity and decay kinetics, charged-particle interactions, photon interactions, neutron interactions, and sources of ionizing radiation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   ,  .
  
  • HPS 301 - Principles of Health Physics


    Health physics as it pertains to medicine, industry, and the government. Topics include: radiation terms, quantities and units, radiation protection standards, radiation safety and protection, radiation biology, and regulations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HPS 300.
  
  • HPS 402 - Radiation Detection


    Provides a basic understanding of dosimetry and radiation detection. Energy loss through the interaction of radiation with matter. Differing typed of spectroscopy, electronics, and instrumentation involved in radiation detection. Statistics, errors, and interpretation encountered in data collection.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HPS 300.
  
  • HPS 403 - Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Laboratory


    Laboratory experiments in basic radiation physics and detection. Includes operation and calibration of survey instruments and gas-filled counters. Theory and operation of alpha and gamma spectrometry equipment and liquid scintillation counters. Laboratories and discussions on counting statistics and basic electronics.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites HPS 402.
    Prerequisites HPS 300,
  
  • HPS 411 - Health Physics Seminar


    Forum for students, faculty, and/or invited speakers to present research activities, current events, market issues, and new products in the area of health physics.

    Credits 1
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.
  
  • HPS 416 - Advanced Health Physics


    Solutions to problems pertaining to radiation safety in the environment, industry, medical facilities, and nuclear reactors. Topics include shielding, accelerators, radon, non-ionizing radiation, and radiation dose-effect.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HPS 301, 402 and 420.
  
  • HPS 420 - Radiation Biology


    Radiation biochemistry, radiation effects on cellular structure and function, organs and systems, organisms, and populations. Discussions include target theory, direct and indirect effects, cell survival kinetics, prompt effects including acute radiation syndrome, delayed effects, and dose-effect relationships.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites BIOL 189 or BIOL 224, and RAD 102/HPS 102 or HPS 300.
  
  • HPS 470 - Environmental Health Physics


    Cosmic and terrestrial radiation sources. Emphasis on TENORM, radon and pathway modeling. Topics include environmental regulations, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear weapons testing and accidents, geohydrology and geochemistry.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites HPS 301.
    Prerequisites MATH 182.
  
  • HPS 475 - Medical Health Physics


    Role and responsibility of the health physicist in the medical environment. Prepares the student to support medical procedures using radioactivity to ensure compliance with state and federal standards.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HPS 301.
  
  • HPS 491 - Health Physics Internship


    Students apply knowledge of the bio-physical sciences and health physics to practical situations through an internship with practicing local radiation safety officers. Settings could include public or proprietary organizations depending upon the interest of the individual student.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HPS 301.
  
  • HPS 495 - Health Physics Research


    Participation in a research project in radiation science selected by faculty and students to demonstrate research potential in the field. Project may be conducted at a radiation laboratory, clinic, hospital or at the university.

    Credits (1-6)
    Prerequisites HPS 301.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • HPS 499 - Directed Study


    Directed study of selected health physics problems, including individual research, on related topics. Topic selected by student and approved by faculty.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
  
  • HSC 100 - Inquiry and Issues in Health Sciences


    Formerly Listed as CLS 100.

    This First Year Experience course examines scientific research methods, ethics and communication in the Health Sciences. Disciplines within health science are explored. Global and multicultural issues are identified related to health care delivery, policy and research.

    Credits 2
  
  • HSC 310 - Patient Education in the Health Sciences


    Techniques to improve healthful behavior of patients via education. Theories and principles of learning, assessment of patient’s needs, and processes of implementation and evaluation of appropriate teaching/learning strategies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites NURS 120.
  
  • HSC 320 - Patient-Provider Relationships in the Health Sciences


    Examination of health care-related issues and concepts with emphasis on communication between patient and practitioner.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites ENG 101 and 102; NURS 120.
  
  • HSC 400 - Research Methodologies in the Health Sciences


    Examination of the issues involved in planning, conducting, and evaluating research. Emphasis on qualitative and quantitative research methodologies appropriate to the allied health professions.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites KIN 300.
  
  • HSC 405 - Ethical Issues in Health Care


    Study of the philosophical basis of ethics and ethical decision-making practices in contemporary health care with an examination of the differences between “masculine” and “feminine” ethical decision-making patterns. Includes an analysis of current ethical issues such as abortion, right to die, euthanasia, organ transplants, and individual versus collective rights of persons.

    Credits 3
  
  • HSC 410 - Management Principles in the Health Sciences


    Introduction of concepts that influence the role of the manager or administrator in a health care setting.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites HSC 320.
  
  • HSC 420 - Information Technology for the Health Sciences


    Computer applications for the allied health professions. Overview of issues and trends pertaining to the implementation of computer-based innovations in the clinical or practice setting. Emphasis on communications, information management, and information retrieval.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites CS 115.
  
  • HSC 490 - Professional Paper in the Health Sciences


    Discussion of the components of a professional paper, conducting in-depth literature review, and writing a professional paper.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Senior standing in B.S. in Health Sciences program.
  
  • HSC 492 - Holistic Health Care: The Art and Science of Caring and Healing


    Examines and evaluates scientific evidence of holistic modalities that can be implemented into health care practices of daily life. Emphasizes the meaning of a holistic perspective for practice implications and daily life.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PSY 101.
  
  • HSC 499 - Special Topics in Health Sciences


    Specialized instruction in special topics in health sciences designed to develop understanding of current health sciences issues.

    Credits (1-6)
    Prerequisites Consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • IB 480 - International Business


    This course considers the objectives and strategies of international business in the context of global competition. It equips students with a comprehensive framework to formulate strategies in the global marketplace, with intensive study of the unique aspects of doing business in foreign continents.
     

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Admission to a business major/junior standing,  .
  
  • IB 481 - International Business Internship


    Supervised on-site practical experience in international business at an enterprise or agency, culminating in a written report.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites A 3.00 GPA, admission to the major and completion of nine credit hours of courses within the major.
    Notes May occur locally or abroad. S/F grading only.
  
  • IDS 201 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies


    Introduces concepts and methods of interdisciplinary study and provides students with the necessary tools to begin integrating their areas of study. Provides students with the opportunity to develop their career exploration skills. Students begin work on their portfolios by focusing on and developing concepts related to each area of study.

    Credits 3
  
  • IDS 240 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods



    Prepares students to conduct interdisciplinary research by examining the practices, protocols and theories of research used in social and natural sciences and the humanities, including quantitative and qualitative methods.
     

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • IDS 299 - Rebel Internship Program: General Internship


    The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the world of work by providing a structured internship experience that reinforces classroom concepts through hands-on application. This course takes a reflective approach to career development by facilitating students’ understanding and competence of a particular career path.

    Credits 1
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • IDS 491 - Independent Study


    Independent study and/or research specifically related to the student’s two or three areas of study. Conducted under faculty supervision.

    Credits 1-3
    Prerequisites   and consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • IDS 494 - Interdisciplinary Inquiry


    Facilitates the application of interdisciplinary research and research design. Students will develop research questions, and apply various research methodologies towards the completion of their Capstone projects. Students will determine how their work and ideas intersect with the chosen theme, employing their interdisciplinary skills to understand and explore the complexity of that theme.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and one of the following:  ,  ,    ,  ,  ,    ,  ,  .
  
  • IDS 495A - Interdisciplinary Studies Capstone


    Entails the completion and presentation of a portfolio demonstrating a synthesis of the student’s areas of study. Portfolio may include a comprehensive report, specialized field experience, internship, or creative production reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the plan of study.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  ,  .
  
  • IDS 495B - Independent Study: Capstone II


    Completion and presentation of portfolio demonstrating a synthesis of student’s areas of study. Through enrollment in a summer internship with an approved site, students complete work, including a capstone project, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the IDS degree. Must be taken in the student’s senior year.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and consent of instructor.
  
  • INF 100 - Introduction to Informatics I - Basic Concepts


    Deals with the nature of Informatics within the information technology space. The core concept of integration of people, technology and information will be addressed. The emphasis will be on the practical dimension of Informatics, real problems, and the socio-economic situations in which they arise. A variety of Informatics tools will be presented from a variety of domains, and their implications for science, engineering, art, the humanities and society will be discussed.

    Credits 3
  
  • INF 110 - Intro to Informatics II - Information Infrastructures


    Extension of the outcomes of the White House National information infrastructure task force. Basic concepts of computing and network hardware; software architecture of information systems; systems and applications programming. Fundamental data constructs. General problem-solving techniques. Building secure and reliable information infrastructures.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites INF 100.
  
  • INF 200 - Social Informatics


    Social and behavioral foundations of informatics. Theoretical approaches to how technology is used from psychological and sociotechnical perspectives. Examples of how current and emerging technologies such as games, e-mail, and electronic commerce are affecting daily lives, social relations, work, and leisure time.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites INF 110 and PHIL 114.
  
  • INF 202 - Introduction to Healthcare Informatics


    Introduces the fields of informatics within the healthcare sector. Emphasizes core concept of the integration of people, technology and information. Focuses on the applications of informatics within healthcare delivery settings, from hospitals to provider offices to long-term care facilities to the home care setting. Informatics domains in various healthcare fields are presented, and changes in healthcare practice due to technology integration and deployment are highlighted.

    Credits 3
  
  • INF 210 - Organizational Informatics


    Needs, uses, and consequences of information in organizational contexts. Topics include organizational types and characteristics, functional areas and business processes, information-based products and services, use of and redefining role of information technology, changing character of work and organizational practices, socio-technical structures, and rise and transformation of information-based industries.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites INF 110 and PHIL 114.
  
  • INF 220 - Human-Computer Interaction


    The analysis of human factors and the design of computer application interfaces. A survey of current best practices with an eye toward the evolutionary path of future technologies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites INF 110 and PHIL 114.
  
  • INF 230 - Information Representation


    Concepts and structure of information representation in social and technical applications. Data representation; Data modeling; Logical and physical representation of information; Information organization; Information classification and categorization; Knowledge representation and discovery.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • INF 300 - Digital Media


    Studies how the paradigm shift to a digital world will affect humanity. Considers the evolution of media arts and its underlying principles of communications. Introduction to, and comparison between, digital media for secure storage of disparate media types. Secure media management. Students will study application development paradigms in current practice.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites INF 220.
  
  • INF 310 - Information and Computer Systems Security


    Current information and computer systems security issues, tools and practices. Basic cryptography, operations security, personnel and administrative security. Legal issues in information, computing and networked systems. Technical aspects of information and computer systems security required for optimal decision making. Risk analysis. Risk management. Information warfare. Information economics. Privacy. Maintaining continuous operation. Incident response. Security training. Security certifications. Case studies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites INF 210.
  
  • INF 320 - Informatics Project Management


    Fundamentals of project management, planning, reporting, team building, and team leadership. The project lifecycle; planning, analysis, design, implementation, testing, evaluation, and maintenance. Security risks and controls. Responding to changes in market conditions, resources, requirements, and schedules. Securing systems and processes. Security risks, risk management, and controls. Budgeting for information security, reliability and privacy.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites INF 210 and MATH 132.
  
  • INF 330 - Business Analysis for Informatics


    Broad overview of Informatics Business Analysis. Topics include planning and monitoring, requirements management and communication, enterprise analysis, elicitation, requirements analysis, solution assessment and validation, underlying competencies, methodologies and tools used in the industry.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
 

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