Jul 07, 2022  
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Graduate Courses


 
  
  •  

    GEOL 762 - Geological Applications of Computers


    Credits 3

    Use of computer algorithms to solve geological problems, geostatistics, modeling of geological processes.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and CS 116 and 169.

  
  •  

    GEOL 765 - Seminar in Stratigraphy


    Credits 3

    Special topics in stratigraphy with emphasis on southern Nevada and adjacent regions.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 766 - Earth Systems Change


    Credits 3

    Investigate long-term and short-term global climate changes, ocean redox evolution, and their impacts on biospheric innovations. Explore interactions between Earth’s sub spheres (lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere) during times of extreme environmental changes in Earth history and testing methods and techniques for such interactions.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 770 - Sedimentary Basins


    Credits 3

    Analysis of current ideas concerning the plate tectonic setting and evolution of sedimentary basins. Emphasis on characteristic styles of basin sedimentation and resulting stratigraphic framework, provenance of basin fill, chronologic relationship of tectonic events and sedimentation, and methods of basin analysis.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 772 - Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation


    Credits 4

    Fundamentals of geologic interpretation using seismic reflection data. Introduction to seismic data acquisition and processing. Interpretation techniques include well log to seismicities, contour maps and time-to depth conversion. Interpretation of data from different structural settings, seismic stratigraphy, and 3-D seismic interpretation.

    Notes
    Three hour lecture and three hour lab.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 772L - Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation Laboratory


    Credits 0

    Lab course designed to supplement the lecture course. Interpretations of several structural regimes, structure contour maps, correlation using well logs, creation of synthetics, and the interpretation of a 3-D seismic data set.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 773 - Seminar in Geophysics


    Credits 1 – 3

    Specialized topics in geophysics with an emphasis on current analysis techniques and problems.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 775 - Seminar in Economic Geology


    Credits 3

    Analysis of current problems, concepts and research in economic geology and closely related fields.

    Prerequisites
    GEOL 677 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 776 - Paleosols Records of Past Landscapes


    Credits 3

    Recognition and analysis of soil horizons preserved in the rock record. Use of paleosols for reconstructing paleoclimates, tectonics, depositional environments, and other aspects of geologic history.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and GEOL 462 (or equivalent) or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 777 - Instrumental Techniques in Geology


    Credits 3

    Use of modern instrumentation to acquire geological and geochemical data. Includes, but not limited to, the practical application of x-ray diffraction and fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Notes
    Six hours laboratory.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 779 - Theory of Ore Deposition


    Credits 3

    Study of physical and chemical processes which contribute to metal solubility, transport, and precipitation. Includes fundamental geochemical and thermodynamic concepts as they apply to ore and gangue mineral stability under various geologic conditions.

    Prerequisites
    GEOL 426 and GEOL 477.

  
  •  

    GEOL 780 - Terrigenous Depositional Systems


    Credits 3

    Examination of modern nonmarine and marine depositional environments dominated by terrigenous sediments, processes that operate in these settings, and responses of sediment to processes. Establish criteria for recognizing these environments and processes in ancient terrigenous sequences.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and GEOL 462 or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 781 - Carbonate Depositional Systems


    Credits 3

    Examination of modern non-marine and marine depositional environments dominated by carbonate sediments, organisms that produce sediments, processes that operate in these settings, and responses of sediment to the processes. Establish criteria for recognizing these environments and processes in ancient carbonate sequences.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and GEOL 462 or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 782 - Sandstone Petrology


    Credits 4

    Description, classification, and interpretation of terrigenous sedimentary rocks. Emphasis on petrographic methods applied to sandstones and interpretation of provenance of sedimentary sequences.

    Prerequisites
    GEOL 780 (corequisite) or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 783 - Carbonate Petrology


    Credits 4

    Study of the physical and chemical factors important in the genesis and diagenesis of carbonate sediments and rocks. Various analytical techniques covered, with emphasis on thin section petrography for deciphering rock components and diagenesis.

    Prerequisites
    GEOL 781 (corequisite) or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 785 - Seminar in Sedimentology


    Credits 1 – 4

    Analysis of current problems, concepts, and research in sedimentary geology and related fields. Emphasis may be upon the genesis and diagenesis of specific sedimentary sequences or upon particular depositional or diagenetic environments.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and either GEOL 780 or GEOL 781, or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 786 - Soils Applications: Paleoclimate, Neotectonics, Archeology


    Credits 3

    Special topics of current interest in soil science with emphasis on the use of soils for applications in geomorphology, paleoclimate, neotectonics, and/or archeology.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in geology, biology, anthropology, or consent of instructor.

  
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    GEOL 787 - Thesis Research


    Credits 1 – 6

    Supervised research prior to approval of master’s program prospectus.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits, but only one credit can be applied to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
    Enrollment in the M.S. Program.

  
  •  

    GEOL 789 - Dissertation Research


    Credits 1 – 6

    Supervised research prior to advancement to candidacy in the doctoral program.

    Notes
    May be repeated, but only two credits can be applied to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
    Enrollment in the doctoral program.

  
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    GEOL 792 - Seminar in Hydroscience


    Credits 1 – 3

    Specialized topics in hydroscience.

  
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    GEOL 793 - Independent Study and Research


    Credits 1 – 3

    Independent study and research projects in some field of geology. Proposed project for study must be submitted in writing to the graduate program coordinator and the department chair for approval and credit evaluation at least two weeks prior to registration.

    Notes
    May be repeated for credit, but only three credits are permitted per instructor unless special permission is received.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 794 - Directed Readings


    Credits 1 – 3

    Supervised readings on special topics in consultation with a geoscience graduate faculty member.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Requires consent of student’s academic adviser.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
    Admission to Geoscience Ph.D. program; Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 795 - Poster Presentation and Time Management


    Credits 1

    Presentation of geological information in poster format and time management skills. Poster presentation includes layout and design, focus, data versus interpretation, computer graphics, verbal presentation and referencing. Time management issues include scheduling, planning, organization, and productivity.

    Notes
    Should be taken during first or second semester of graduate program.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in Geoscience.

  
  •  

    GEOL 796 - Advanced Topics in Geoscience


    Credits 1 – 3

    Variety of advanced studies of current and/or topical interest in specialized areas of geoscience.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Varies, depending upon the specific topic.

  
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    GEOL 797 - Thesis


    Credits 1 – 6

    Research, analysis, and writing towards completion of thesis and subsequent defense.

    Notes
    May be repeated, but only six credits applied to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    GEOL 799 - Dissertation


    Credits 3 – 6

    Research analysis and writing toward completion of dissertation and subsequent defense.

    Notes
    Twelve credits are required for the degree, may be repeated, but only twelve credits will be applied to the student’s degree program. May be repeated but only a maximum of 12 credits may be used in students degree program

    Grading
    S/F grade.

    Prerequisites
    Successful completion of qualifying examination and approval by department.

  
  •  

    HCA 631 - Quality Management in Health Services Organizations


    Credits 3

    Quality outcome measurement in healthcare and the patient experience influences reporting and reimbursement.  Focus on quality metric measurement, analyzing, managing and improving population health outcomes.

    Prerequisites
    HCA 701  

  
  •  

    HCA 652 - Health Politics and Policy


    Credits 3

    Role of politics and policy-making as an external environmental impact on health care. Describes the political process in health care policy-making at all government levels. Interest group politics introduced in the context of the roles that these groups play in health care policy development and how these forces and health care organizations react to shape health care policy. Prerequisites: HIST 100, PSC 100, or PSC 101. 3 credits.

  
  •  

    HCA 680 - Organization and Management of Long-Term Care Services


    Credits 3

    Examination of health and social services for the elderly with emphasis on structure and function of the long-term care industry. Focuses on management of nursing home services. Includes analysis of reimbursement, regulatory, and other social, economic, political and legal factors affecting health and social services for the elderly.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HCA 480. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HCA 700 - Fundamentals of Health Care Financial Management


    Credits 3

    Exploration of accounting and financial management principles and concepts for decision-making in health care organizations.

    Grading
    Letter Grade

  
  •  

    HCA 701 - U.S. Health Care System: Programs and Policies


    Credits 3

    Examines the manpower, financing and major service components of the US health care system. Addresses major issues of health care access, costs, and quality of care. Special emphasis on the role of government regulation and public policy in the system.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    HCA 702 - Epidemiology in Health Services Management


    Credits 3

    Examination and synthesis of concepts and an application of methods appropriate to epidemiology from a managerial perspective.

  
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    HCA 703 - Management of Health Service Organizations and Systems


    Credits 3

    Theories and practice of the management of health services. Analysis and evaluation of the management functions and roles, organizational theories and behavioral perspectives and health care policy issues as they apply to health services management.

  
  •  

    HCA 715 - Health Services Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Course examines health services research concepts and methods. Topics include: health services research relevance; research study conceptualization; research design, operationalization and analysis; and the review of the health services research literature. Emphasis on research relevant to the practice of health care management.

    Prerequisites
    EAB 703

  
  •  

    HCA 716 - Health Care Accounting and Finance


    Credits 3

    Introduction to financial and managerial accounting in the context of the health care industry. Also introduces concepts from finance for use in the decision making process.

    Prerequisites
    ACC 201 or equivalent, 3 hours of undergraduate accounting.

  
  •  

    HCA 717 - Human Resources Management of Health Care Organizations


    Credits 3

    Covers structural and behavioral systems and human resources process systems. Taught from the perspective of strategic management and in the context of the legal environment for health care organizations.

  
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    HCA 718 - Health Care Economics


    Credits 3

    Application of economic theory to study of health markets and institutions. Impact of insurance on demand for and supply of health care analyzed. Competition and regulation as forces in health care industry discussed from an economic perspective.

    Prerequisites
    ECON 102 or equivalent, 3 hours of undergraduate microeconomics.

  
  •  

    HCA 719 - Operations and Quality Management of Health Services


    Credits 3

    Introduces concepts of operations management in the context of the health care industry. Covers analytical techniques in the context of quality management.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    HCA 720 - Information Systems in Health Services Management


    Credits 3

    Understanding of computerized needs of health services managers. Examines decision making process, information needs of various decisions and how “decision support systems” meet these needs. Major types of information systems examined, include financial, patient care & strategic management systems.

  
  •  

    HCA 721 - Advanced Health Care Finance


    Credits 3

    Further study of financial management in the context of the health care industry.

    Prerequisites
    HCA 705 or the equivalent.

  
  •  

    HCA 730 - Strategic Management of Health Services


    Credits 3

    Emphasis on concepts of strategic and operational management for health care organizations. Also covers managerial epidemiology and marketing. Utilizes case studies.

    Prerequisites
    HCA 705

  
  •  

    HCA 761 - Health Care Law and Ethics for Managers


    Credits 3

    Course examines legal and ethical issues that impact health care management. Topics include: liability, contract and antitrust law; employee and labor law, professional relations, and ethical issues regarding; beginning and end of life, patient rights, medical research, access to care; conflict of interest, and confidentiality.

  
  •  

    HCA 779 - Health Care Administration Capstone Course


    Credits 3

    Capstone experience provides the Health Care Administration graduate degree candidate the option to select one of the following: an indepth project or a comprehensive examination.

    Same as
    HED 710/EAB 710/EOH 710

    Notes
    The project option requires a formal paper and a presentation.

    Grading
    S/F grading only

    Prerequisites
    Last semester in program or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    HCA 793 - Internship in Health Care Administration


    Credits 3 – 6

    Provides students with an applied work experience in a local health services organization. Course is faculty supervised and requires written reports and other structured assignments.

    Formerly
    HCA 713

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    HCA 794 - Professional Paper in Health Care Administration


    Credits 3

    Provides the opportunity for a graduate degree candidate to be involved in an in-depth project either written or experimental in nature. A formal paper and presentation describing the project culminate this experience. 

    Notes
    May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Department approval.
     

  
  •  

    HCA 798 - Independent Study


    Credits 1 – 3

    Independent study in a specific area of student interest under the direction of a faculty member.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    HCA 799 - Thesis Research


    Credits 3

    Notes
    May be repeated, but a maximum of six credits will apply towards the student’s degree program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of HCA& P Department Chair, graduate courses in research methodology and in statistics.

  
  •  

    HED 629 - Education for Sexuality


    Credits 3

    Physical, mental-emotional, and social aspects of sexuality including sexual communication, relationships, gender, decision making and sexual pleasure and function. Structured to prepare individuals to conduct meaningful learning experiences in personal and family life sex education.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with PBH 429. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HED 720 - Program Planning and Grant Writing in Health Promotion


    Credits 3

    Principles of program planning based on assessing individual and community needs and techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of health promotion programs. Also designed to analyze the process to obtain fiscal resources through grants, contracts, and other internal and external sources.

    Prerequisites
    HED 700, 705

  
  •  

    HID 673 - Design Communication I.


    Credits 6

    The development of fundamental design communication skills and knowledge which are integral to the complex process of design decision making. An overview of design theories and applications of methodologies basic to the development of design concepts, as well as the two and three dimensional representation of design products.

  
  •  

    HID 674 - Design Communication II.


    Credits 6

    A hybrid seminar/workshop course organized around a healthcare design methodological paradigm for conceptualizing and producing digital and analogue output that is driven by a project that, in turn, is driven by sequenced investigations. Functions of software are utilized as approaches to the digitization of interior spatial qualities.

    Prerequisites
    HID 673  

  
  •  

    HID 700 - Professional Internship


    Credits 0

    Professional work experience in a design or government office under the supervision of a licensed or registered practitioner. Supervision is provided by both the Healthcare Interior Design Program Coordinator and the cooperating agency. Registration for course requires Program Coordinator pre-approval.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

  
  •  

    HID 773 - Healthcare Design I.


    Credits 6

    First in a sequence of three project-based and data-driven Healthcare Design courses organized around a neuroscience-informed design methodological paradigm.  Innovative design strategies are developed for private and small group environments to support the transformation of healthcare from reactive and hospital-centered to preventive, person-centered and focused on well-being rather than disease.

    Corequisite
    AAI 650  

  
  •  

    HID 774 - Healthcare Design II.


    Credits 6

    Second in the sequence of three Healthcare Design courses is the design of specialized continuing care environments. Creative and innovative design strategies are developed to support independent living, assisted living, or nursing home care in later years while actively engaging in the culture of a surrounding community. 

    Prerequisites
    HID 773  

    Corequisite
    AAI 723  

  
  •  

    HID 775 - Healthcare Design III.


    Credits 6

    Third in the sequence of three Healthcare Design courses is the design of healthcare facilities and healing environments. Creative and innovative design strategies are developed toward the influencing of the direction of responsibly built environments that will directly and positively impact the safety, operation, clinical outcomes, and financial success of healthcare facilities.

    Prerequisites
    HID 774  

  
  •  

    HID 776 - Design Thesis Research


    Credits 3

    A seminar/lecture course designed to engage processes involved in planning a thesis research to programmatically inform and guide the production of a successful thesis design project.  The course is organized around a framework for defining a thesis topic, research methodologies, writing a comprehensive proposal, and developing a research plan.

  
  •  

    HID 777 - Design Thesis


    Credits 6

    Self-directed design studio course to further investigate and evaluate theoretical ideas beyond Design Thesis Research pursuant to each student’s delineated conceptual framework for research-based design. Continued applications of both traditional scholarly, and design-based research methods by which design processes can engage broader issues in healthcare design

    Prerequisites
    HID 776  

  
  •  

    HIST 601A - American Constitutional and Legal History I


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the life of the law in America from the seventeenth century to modern times. Though designed to complement one another, each half of this course may be taken independently.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 401. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 601B - American Constitutional and Legal History II


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the life of the law in America from the seventeenth century to modern times. Though designed to complement one another, each half of this course may be taken independently.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 402. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 604A - American Social History to 1860


    Credits 3

    Analysis of demography, social structure and mobility factors, and societal institutions of the United States during its formative era. Special attention given to social issues and humanitarian reformism, and to sectional tensions arising from the antislavery movement. Chronological coverage extends from colonial period to Civil War, with emphasis on 1760-1850.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 404A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 604B - American Social History, 1860-Present


    Credits 3

    Examination of U.S. social development since the Civil War, focusing upon problems arising from industrialism, immigration, and urbanism. Analysis of the responsive emergence of the ‘welfare state’ in the Progressive, New Deal, and post World War II eras, supplemented by study of current issues of racism, sexism, and contemporary counterculture.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 404B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 605 - History of the New South


    Credits 3

    Analysis of the post-1865 American South and its regional distinctiveness, with particular emphasis on the rise and decline of one-party politics, economic development from Civil War devastation to the Sunbelt, race relations and the civil rights movement, and the South’s influence on U.S. foreign relations.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 405. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 606A - The American West to 1849


    Credits 3

    Narrative and interpretive study of the development of the West by imperial European powers and Americans to the California Gold Rush. Emphasis on the westward movement and its role in American history.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 406A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 606B - The American West Since 1849


    Credits 3

    Narrative and interpretive study of the economic, political, and social developments in the trans-Mississippi West from the California Gold Rush to the present.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 406B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 607A - United States Foreign Relations I


    Credits 3

    Analysis of the domestic origins, implementation, and international consequences of U.S. foreign relations from 1920 to the present. Includes diplomatic, economic, and cultural relations.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 407A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 607B - United States Foreign Relations II


    Credits 3

    Analysis of the domestic origins, implementation, and international consequences of U.S. foreign relations from 1920 to the present. Includes diplomatic, economic, and cultural relations.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 407B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 610A - American Cultural and Intellectual History I


    Credits 3

    Developments in cultural, intellectual, and religious history from European contact to the Civil War.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 410A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 610B - American Cultural and Intellectual History II


    Credits 3

    Developments in cultural, intellectual, and religious history from the Civil War to the present.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 410B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 611 - United States: Colonial Period


    Credits 3

    Origins of the North American colonies, development of colonial society, culture, and institutions; background factors involved in the American Revolution.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 411. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 612 - United States: Revolution and the New Republic


    Credits 3

    Examination of the course and impact of the American Revolution; the adoption of the Constitution; and the political, diplomatic, and economic developments during the early national period.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 412. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 614A - United States: National Period, 1815-1860


    Credits 3

    Era of Good Feelings; the Age of Jackson; the problems of expansion; the growing controversy over slavery to the secession of South Carolina in December 1860.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 414A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 614B - United States: Civil War and Reconstruction,1860-1877


    Credits 3

    Era of the Civil War from secession in 1860 to the close of hostilities in 1865; presidential and congressional Reconstruction until the close of this era in 1877.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 414B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 615A - United States: Gilded Age, 1877-1900


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the impact of industrialization, immigration and urbanization upon the American experiment in republicanism. Examines how diverse Americans, including ex-slaves, farmers, feminists, “new” immigrants, Plains Indians, radicals, soldiers, statesmen, industrialists and laborers responded to these unsettling conditions and helped to usher in the modern age.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 415A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 615B - United States: The Progressive Era, 1900-1920


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the dramatic social, cultural, and political changes that occurred in the United States between 1900 and 1920 in the period known as the Progressive Era. Examines how Americans fashioned responses to the challenges posed by the modernization and diversification of their society.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 415B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 616A - Recent America: Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1920-1945


    Credits 3

    Examination of social, economic, and political trends in the 1920s and of the transition from inflated prosperity to the Great Depression of the 1930s. Special attention to F.D.R.’s presidential role, to the New Deal and concurrent domestic problems, and to foreign policy issues. Coverage includes U.S. entrance and role in World War II.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 416A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 616B - Contemporary America: The U.S. Since 1945


    Credits 3

    Cold War abroad and readjustments bringing affluence and anxieties at home. Special focus upon the Korean War, McCarthyism, Kennedy’s New Frontier and Johnson’s Great Society, “limited warfare” in Cuba and Vietnam, and the Nixon Administration. Social and political tensions of the ‘60s and ‘70s also examined.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 416B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 617A - Nevada and the Far West


    Credits 3

    Study of the far western region, with emphasis on Nevada history. Includes research projects.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 417A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 619A - Britain to 1750


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the economy, society, politics and culture of the British isles from earliest settlement to 1750.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 419A. Credit at the 600 level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 619B - Britain from 1750


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the economy, society, politics and culture of the British isles and British empire from 1750 to present.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 419B. Credit at the 600 level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 620 - Topics in Central Europe: 1914 - Present


    Credits 3

    Topics on the political and social change in Central Europe from the outbreak of World War I to the present. Topics vary.

  
  •  

    HIST 621 - History of Russia to 1825


    Credits 3

    Examination of the formation of Kievan Rus, the Mongol invasion, the emergence of Muscovite autocracy, religious schism, westernization in the seventeenth century and under Peter I, the establishment of serfdom, the problem of Empire, Catherine II and Alexander I.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 421. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 622 - History of Russia Since 1825


    Credits 3

    Analysis of conservative modernization under Nicholas I, the birth of the intelligentsia, the Great Reforms, industrialization, revolution, the establishment of the Soviet State, stagnation under Brezhnev, Perestroika under Gorbachev, and the dissolution of the USSR.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 422. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 623A - History of Germany to 1848


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the institutional, social, economic, political and cultural development of the German states.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 423A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 623B - History of Germany Since 1848


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of the institutional, social, economic, political and cultural development of the Germany to the present.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 423B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 624 - Role of Religion in American Culture


    Credits 3

    Study of the relationship between religion and secular culture in the American experience from the colonial era to the present.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 424. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 625 - History of Southern Nevada


    Credits 3

    History of the Nevada counties of Nye, Esmeralda, Mineral, Lincoln, and Clark since the arrival of the European. The case of southern Nevada used to illustrate techniques for the study of local history in general.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 425. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    HIST 626 - The American West Through Film


    Credits 3

    Analyzes the relationships between the history of the American West, movie westerns, and the cultural climate of the United States after 1945. Six credits of history.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 426. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 628 - History of Business in United States History


    Credits 3

    Examines the growth and influence of business upon American history from colonial times to the present. Includes the role played by business groups in the American Revolution, adoption of the U.S. Constitution, westward expansion, the Civil War, World War II, and the development of major American cities.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 428. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 629 - History of American Labor, 1607-Present


    Credits 3

    Analyzes the history of American working men and women from the founding of the American colonies to the present. Emphasis placed on significant events, institutions, and the ordinary lives of laborers themselves, all of which are viewed against the backdrop of an evolving capitalist economic system.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 429. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 632A - History of American Women to 1870


    Credits 3

    Examines the history of women in the United States from the period of European contact to Reconstruction. Examines women’s changing roles in the family, work force, politics, and social movements. Examines the historical experience of European colonists, Native Americans, African Americans, and immigrants.

    Same as
    WMST 432A

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 432A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 632B - History of American Women, 1870 to Present


    Credits 3

    Women’s relationship to the economy and to political movements; changing ideals of womanhood; the demographic and sexual revolutions transforming family life and gender roles; and class, race, ethnic, and regional variations in female experience.

    Same as
    WMST 432B

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 432B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 633 - African-American History


    Credits 3

    Topical approach to Black history that seeks to illuminate grand themes such as DuBois’ notion of “double-consciousness,” the dilemma of being both Black and American. Explores in depth such topics as religion, family, slavery, urban life, education, labor, culture, and politics.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits.

    This couse is crosslisted with HIST 433. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 633B - Arican-American History to 1877


    Credits 3

    An examination of African-American history to 1877 that considers roles of free and enslaved blacks in the shaping of America’s social, cultural, economic, and political developments. Themes include the slave trade, creation of race and slavery, gender, and African influences on both slave and American culture.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 433B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 633C - African-American History since 1877


    Credits 3

    Examination of the emergence of African-Americans from the aftermath of the Civil War to present. Themes include the restrictions imposed by Jim Crow, segregation beyond the South, the Civil Rights movement, inner city rebellions and the new Black cultural movement.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 433C. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 634 - Role of Cities in American History


    Credits 3

    Growth of cities from colonial times to the present. Topics include urbanization, suburbanization, transportation innovations, crime, housing, and racial conflicts. Special emphasis given to the role of the city in American history.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 434. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 634A - European Urban History


    Credits 3

    Investigation of the radical impact of industrial modernity upon the European metropolis from the eighteenth century onwards. Focuses on cultural, social, technological, and architectural developments in the major European cities, such as London, Paris, Vienna, and Berlin.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 434A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 634B - Great Cities in History


    Credits 3

    Study of a selected city or cities to be determined by the instructor.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. This course is crosslisted with HIST 434B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 635A - Early Modern Intellectual History


    Credits 3

    Renaissance to the Enlightenment, 1450-1775, including humanism, republicanism, Protestantism, science, liberalism, and early economic thinking.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with HIST 435A. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 635B - Modern Intellectual History


    Credits 3

    Analysis and interpretation of European attitudes and ideas since the Enlightenment, 1775-present, including Idealism, Marxism, cultural individualism, psychoanalysis, existentialism, and structuralism.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted wtih HIST 435B. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    HIST 635C - Topics in European Cultural and Intellectual History


    Credits 3

    In-depth study of specific aspects of early modern and modern European cultural and intellectual history.

    Same as
    HIST 435C

 

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