Dec 05, 2022  
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Graduate Courses


 
  
  •  

    HSC 702 - Translational Research Design


    Credits 3

    Clinical and translational research concepts and design elements in the context of interdisciplinary health care with an emphasis on contemporary issues and best practice approaches.

  
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    HSC 703 - Interdisciplinary Grant Writing for Health Sciences


    Credits 3

    This course involves preparing and writing an interdisciplinary grant proposal for health sciences. Students from different health science disciplines will work together to develop an innovative and significant grant proposal.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate-level research course that covers the research process (research problem, literature review, methods, and statistical/data analysis).

  
  •  

    HSC 704 - Selected Applications in Statistics 2


    Credits 3

    This course is designed to provide students with the statistical tools necessary for analyzing data  from experimental designs such as those found in the Health Sciences and related disciplines.  This course is intended to be taken following the introductory statistics course, KIN 751.  

    Prerequisites
    KIN 751  

  
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    HSC 705 - Clinical Trial Design And Analysis


    Credits 3

    Comprehensive and in depth review of the principles and methodologies utilized in designing and conducting clinical trials in health care research.  Statistical principles specific to clinical trial design and data analyses will also be covered.

    Prerequisites
    HSC 704  

  
  •  

    HSC 710 - Seminar


    Credits 1

    Preparation and presentation of seminars on topics of current interest in healthcare research.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of three credits.

  
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    HSC 777 - Advanced Applied Statistics for the Health Sciences


    Credits 3

    Application of advanced statistical procedures to the investigation of research problems in the health science professions. Emphasis on a conceptual understanding of selected advanced statistical techniques with application to the investigation and analysis of problems in the health sciences area.

    Prerequisites
    Introductory course in statistics and introduction to research methodology course or consent of instructor.

  
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    IB 787 - International Seminar


    Credits 3

    A field study that exposes students to the competitve environment of an international business in the EU, Asia, South America or other emerging markets. Students will visit selected organizations, operating outside the USA, to learn first-hand the businesses’ processes and experience the socio-cultural elements of the selected country.
     

    Formerly
    MGT 787

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.

    Prerequisites
    12 hours of graduate course study or consent of the MIB department.

  
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    INF 730 - Human Computer Interaction


    Credits 3

    Covers the fundamental concepts and techniques for design, implementation, and evaluation of human computer interfaces. Topics include Foundations of Human computer interaction, design and implementation techniques for graphical user interfaces, evaluation techniques, and different interface models.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    INF 731 - Advanced HCI - Design and Implementation


    Credits 3

    This course is organized around readings that reinforce the student’s knowledge in Human Computer Interaction guidelines, principles, and theories and mainly around projects that allow students to apply theoretical knowledge to the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive computer systems.

    Prerequisites
    INF 730

  
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    INF 732 - Affectively Intelligent Systems


    Credits 3

    Focuses on computational emotion modeling which spawns from a variety of interest: improving basic understanding of the functional role of emotions in humans; integrating emotion recognition and prediction techniques; synthesizing emotion and expression of emotion to apply to synthetic characters, autonomous software agents or robots; understanding social implications of affective information and communication technology.

    Prerequisites
    INF 700

  
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    INF 740 - Digital Media Design, Technology and Representation


    Credits 3

    Covers principles of design to visualize new media concepts in any medium. Exposes students to new and emerging digital media technologies and applications.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    INF 760 - Advanced Theoretical Foundations of Informatics


    Credits 3

    Advanced course to cover mathematical methods for information modeling, analysis, and manipulation. Requires various research article reading and discussions. Topics include proof techniques, first-order logic, computability theory, complexity theory, model theory, and statistics.

    Prerequisites
    INF 700

  
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    INF 770 - Social Foundations of Informatics


    Credits 3

    Covers the relationships between social systems and information and communication technologies. Focuses on social factors that influence the organization of information technologies in social and organizational systems, and how the human social factors and technological tools mutually contribute to the field of Informatics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

  
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    INF 780 - Special Topics in Informatics


    Credits 3

    Emphasis is on new developments and research in science, humanities, fine arts, and other domain informatics.

    Prerequisites
    INF 700

  
  •  

    INF 790 - Informatics Project


    Credits 3

    Advanced project in informatics.

    Notes
    May be repeated for different project topics, but only three credits will be applied to the student’s program.

    Prerequisites
    INF 700 and consent of instructor.

  
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    INF 792 - Internship


    Credits 3

    Supervised internship in business, industry, government, or educational institution providing practical experience to use skills and knowledge acquired in informatics and cognate course work.

    Prerequisites
    INF 700 and consent of instructor.

  
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    INF 794 - Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Examination of research methods including: the scientific method, sampling, statistics, research design, analytical technique, literature review, technical writing, professional ethics, faculty research areas and potential topics for thesis.

    Prerequisites
    INF 700

  
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    INF 795 - Independent Study in Informatics


    Credits 1-6

    Supervised independent work in a topic of Informatics.

    Notes
    May be repeated but no more than 6 credits will be allowed in the degree.

    Grading
    S/F grading only

    Prerequisites
    INF 700 and Instructor consent

  
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    INF 797 - Master’s Thesis


    Credits 1-6

    Research analysis and writing towards completion of Master’s thesis and subsequent defense.

    Notes
    May be repeated but no more than 6 credits will be allowed in the degree.

    Grading
    S/F grading only

    Prerequisites
    INF 700 and Instructor consent

  
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    INF 799 - Dissertation Research


    Credits 1 – 6

    Research analysis and writing towards completion of dissertation and subsequent defense.

    Notes
    May be repeated but no more than eighteen credits will be allowed in the degree.

    Prerequisites
    Passing the written comprehensive examination.

  
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    ITAL 603 - Advanced Reading Proficiency in Italian


    Credits 3

    Develops advanced reading skills in Italian through textual analysis of a broad range of reading materials.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with ITAL 403. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work. May be repeated to a maxiumum of twelve credits.

  
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    ITAL 662 - Dante’s Divine Comedy


    Credits 3

    A select reading in the Divine Comedy with some reference to Dante’s other works, Convivio, Monarchia, and Vita Nuova.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with ITAL 462. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work. Taught in English.

  
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    ITE 651 - Managing Big Data and Web Databases


    Credits 3

    This course will teach the concepts and techniques of databases for real-time web and big data applications. The course will focus primarily on NoSQL, object oriented, and XML databases.  Topics include characteristics and significance of NoSQL databases, NoSQL data formats, key and value pairs, basic schema in NoSQL, and table structures and data types.

     

    Same as
    Crosslisted with ITE 451

    Notes
    Not repeatable beyond 3 credits.
     

    Grading
    Letter

  
  •  

    JMS 601 - The First Amendment and Society


    Credits 3

    Examination of the evolution and contemporary impact of laws relating to communication.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with JOUR 401. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    JMS 608 - Media Criticism


    Credits 3

    Critical study of the rhetorical dimensions of newspapers, magazines, books, television, and motion pictures.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with JOUR 408. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    JMS 613 - History Of Journalism


    Credits 3

    History of American mass media from antecedents in medieval Europe to the present.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with JOUR 413. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    JMS 620 - Visual Literacy


    Credits 3

    Analysis of graphics, film, television, and computer images. Theoretical, critical, and practical application. Hands-on experience emphasized with a lot of pictorial examples viewed and discussed in class.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with JOUR 420. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    JMS 635 - Mass Communication Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Survey of empirical research methods in communication including laboratory, field, and survey methods and their applications.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted wtih JOUR 435. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    JMS 684 - Mass Media and Political Communication


    Credits 3

    Analysis of historical and contemporary political discourse. Addresses such topics as presidential rhetoric, electoral campaigns, ethics in political culture, institutional leadership, publics and public opinion, mediated political speech, legislative debates, political socialization.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with JOUR 484. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    JMS 685 - Mass Media and Society


    Credits 3

    In-depth look at the functions of the press in gathering and disseminating knowledge, news and entertainment; specific attention paid to the role of the press in shaping public opinion and influencing public action.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with JOUR 485. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    JMS 687 - Ethics in Mass Media


    Credits 3

    This course is approved for use in graduate programs for Master of Arts candidates. A full description of this course may be found in the Undergraduate Catalog under the corresponding 400 number.

  
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    JMS 708 - Journalism and Media Studies Colloquium


    Credits 1

    Required core class, introduction to JMS for graduate students in program. Provides an overview of the fields and interrelationships of journalism and media studies. Introduction to theories, methods, and research skills, plus contemporary JMS scholarship, use of library and other tools, development of a bibliography.

    Grading
    S/F grading only

  
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    JMS 709 - Introduction to Research Methods in Journalism and Media Studies


    Credits 3

    Introduction to methods used in JMS research, concentrating on tools students may encounter in developing literature reviews and papers, including theses or papers. Students demonstrate familiarity with methods by developing and presenting an original research paper that features the use of a methodological approach discussed in class.

  
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    JMS 710 - Survey of Journalism and Media Studies


    Credits 3

    Introduction to graduate research writing including learning the proper technical aspects of academic writing; also surveys the fields of journalism and media studies and their interrelationships; past, present, and future issues; overview of the program.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
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    JMS 711 - Qualitative Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Fundamentals of humanistic research methodologies; examines such methods as case study, ethnography, focus groups, interviews, visual methods, and other qualitative and critical research methods.

    Notes
    Application and critique of the methods.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
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    JMS 712 - Quantitative Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Fundamentals of scientific approach to research examined and applied; surveys, content analysis, and other methods appropriate to the study of journalistic and media messages, processes, and effects examined.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
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    JMS 713 - History of Journalism and Mass Communication


    Credits 3

    Critical analysis of historical research and scholarship in journalism and media studies including primary sources and methods. Development of a research project.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing

  
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    JMS 715 - Science and Health Communication


    Credits 3

    Investigates the application of communication theory and research to understanding processes through which information related to science, health, environment, and technology reaches the public. Emphasis on mediated communication but also considers the interrelated roles of other channels.

  
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    JMS 730 - Journalism and Media Theory


    Credits 3

    Explores and explains various media phenomena at a theoretical level. Surveys theoretical ideas, the nature of theory, specific theories in the field and those from other fields related to the discipline. Theory evaluation and metatheoretical issues.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
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    JMS 733 - First Amendment Theory


    Credits 3

    Examination of theory development on the meaning of the press and speech clauses of the First Amendment and how First Amendment theory has been reflected in legal decisions.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    JMS 739 - Special Problems in Media Production


    Credits 3

    Discussion and practical experience in production techniques of the mass media.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    JMS 760 - Social Influence of the Media


    Credits 3

    Analysis of mediated communication patterns and their social importance; considers both news, public affairs, and entertainment influences.

    Notes
    Emphasis may vary depending on instructor.

  
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    JMS 761 - Journalism and Media Policy and Regulation


    Credits 3

    In-depth examination of regulation and policy aspects of broadcasting with emphasis on legal research in telecommunications.

  
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    JMS 784 - The Media and Politics


    Credits 3

    Examines the relationship between the media and political leadership, policymaking, campaigns, and related issues. Looks at the mediation of political reality.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
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    JMS 789 - Selected Topics in Journalism and Media Studies


    Credits 3

    Content varies with current developments in research in Journalism and Media Studies.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits with consent of instructor and department chair.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    JMS 794 - Special Readings


    Credits 3

    Content dependent upon the instructor’s interest and expertise, as well as student interest and requirements.

    Notes
    Course may be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
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    JMS 795 - Independent Study


    Credits 1 – 4

    Supervised study in subjects and projects determined in consultation with a faculty member. Students wishing to take this course must consult with the faculty member prior to registration.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Faculty approval.

  
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    JMS 798 - Thesis


    Credits 3

    Research, analysis, and writing towards completion of thesis and subsequent defense.

    Notes
    May be repeated but only six credits apply to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing only.

  
  •  

    KIN 601 - History of Exercise and Sport Science


    Credits 3

    Historical concepts, systems, patterns, and traditions that have influenced American physical activity and sport, with emphasis on the evolution of kinesiology within the discipline of exercise and sport science.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with KIN 401. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    KIN 614 - Enhancing Mental and Motor Abilities


    Credits 3

    Topics of mental and motor abilities including attention, arousal states, information processing, and practice schedules. Special emphasis on enhancing motor performance through mental strategies.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with KIN 414. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    KIN 615 - Introduction to Forensic Kinesiology


    Credits 3

    Survey of forensic investigation. Focus on personal injury and accident avoidance from an interdisciplinary perspective. Emphasis on humans and their interactions in the physical environment.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with KIN 415. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    KIN 656 - Biomechanics of Endurance Performance


    Credits 3

    The primary objective of this course is to provide a study of endurance performance from a biomechanical perspective. At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to apply biomechanical terminology to understand factors that influence endurance swimming, biking, and running performance, for example.

  
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    KIN 657 - Physiology of Endurance Performance


    Credits 3

    The primary objective of this course is to provide a study of endurance performance from an exercise physiology perspective. At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of physiological factors that influence endurance swimming, biking, and running performance, for example.

  
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    KIN 685 - Physical Activity and the Law


    Credits 3

    Legal principles associated with physical activity professions. Emphasis on practical application of legal issues in risk management, safety procedures, negligence, liability, contracts, and professional ethics, as well as recognition and minimization of legal risk during physical activity.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with KIN 485. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    KIN 691 - Exercise Physiology


    Credits 3

    Physiological changes in human organisms during physical exercise; physiological bases for planning physical education programs; observations of respiratory, circulatory, nervous, and metabolic adjustments to physical exercise. Laboratory experience to enhance learning.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with KIN 491. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    KIN 692 - Clinical Exercise Physiology


    Credits 3

    Pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease; role of exercise in treatment and prevention of coronary heart disease; exercise stress testing principles and procedures; prescribing exercise programs for healthy adults and patient populations.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with KIN 492. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    KIN 695 - Sports Medicine


    Credits 3

    This course has been approved for graduate credit. A full description of this course may be found in the Undergraduate Catalog under the corresponding 400 number.

  
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    KIN 700 - Special Problems in Kinesiology


    Credits 1 – 6

    Specialized instruction and/or research designed to develop depth in understanding a current kinesiology problem.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    KIN 730 - Organization and Administration of Athletic Training


    Credits 3

    Develop and utilize organization and administrative theories and philosophies in managing facilities, co-workers and students in a variety of athletic settings.

  
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    KIN 731 - Orthopedic Assessment in Sports Medicine


    Credits 3

    Theory and methods of orthopedic assessment as they relate to the understanding, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of sport injuries. Emphasis on advanced understanding of the theoretical applications of advanced assessment techniques for orthopedic injuries.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    KIN 733 - Psychological Aspects of Sport and Rehabilitation


    Credits 3

    Overview of theoretical concepts and techniques in sport psychology. Emphasis on the application of psychology to human movement, skilled athletic performance, and injury rehabilitation.

  
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    KIN 734 - Therapeutic Intervention in Sports Medicine


    Credits 3

    Theoretical background in the application of therapeutic intervention in a practical setting.

  
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    KIN 735 - Sports Medicine Rehabilitation Principles and Practices


    Credits 3

    Provides opportunity to study theory and techniques of various exercise rehabilitation processes and apply these processes on a case study basis.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

  
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    KIN 736 - Biomechanical Applications in Kinesiology


    Credits 3

    Provides opportunity to learn mechanical principles underlying human movement and apply these skills in a laboratory situation.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    KIN 737 - Biomechanics of Strength


    Credits 3

    Interdisciplinary examination of concepts and principles involved in strength development and force production. Includes study of neurological, physiological and mechanical factors affecting force/tension/power generation, and biomechanical interactions with external loads and various resistance training equipment.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    KIN 738 - Human Physiology


    Credits 3

    Study of mechanisms which regulate physiological systems and the way regulation functions to maintain homeostasis. Emphasis on those systems involved in the integrated response to exercise.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor, undergraduate course in anatomy and physiology.

  
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    KIN 739 - Evaluation of Physical Working Capacity


    Credits 3

    Concepts and methodology in the measurement of energy metabolism in humans. Examination of the various methods used to measure physical working capacity with the treadmill and ergometry. Understanding of basic electrophysiology of myocardium and pulmonary function measurements.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
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    KIN 740 - Advanced Exercise Physiology


    Credits 3

    Lecture, discussion, and laboratory experiences dealing with impact of acute and chronic exercise on several systems. Selected topics such as nutrition and exercise, weight control, physical working capacity, and body composition.

    Prerequisites
    KIN 739

  
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    KIN 743 - Research Techniques in Biomechanics


    Credits 3

    Examination of some of the techniques used in biomechanical research for data collection, analysis, and presentation. Emphasis on developing an understanding of experimental techniques, their capabilities and limitations. The lecture/discussion/lab sessions provide a historical and theoretical basis for each of the techniques examined.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    KIN 744 - Thermoregulation During Physical Work


    Credits 3

    Emphasizes physical mechanisms of heat transfer and their physiological control: relationship among body temperatures, sweat rate, exercise loads, environmental temperature, and heat stress.

    Same as
    (BIO 744)

    Prerequisites
    KIN 739 and consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    KIN 745 - Human Energy Metabolism


    Credits 3

    Study of the interactions between nutrition, energy metabolism, and physical exercise. Emphasis on how the body assimilates, stores, and makes available food energy to power muscular work.

    Prerequisites
    KIN 739 or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    KIN 746 - Computational Methods for Biomechanics


    Credits 3

    The primary objective of this course is to learn to create and use programs to analyze collected data using current biomechanical software.

    Prerequisites
    KIN 736  

  
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    KIN 747 - Graduate Seminar


    Credits 1

    Oral presentations of proposed and completed research by graduate students, graduate faculty, and guests.

    Notes
    May be taken for credit to a maximum of four credits.

  
  •  

    KIN 748 - Professional Paper


    Credits 1 – 6

    Professional paper preparation and subsequent defense.

    Notes
    May be repeated but only three credits will be applied to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

  
  •  

    KIN 749 - Thesis


    Credits 3 – 6

    Research, analysis, and writing towards completion of thesis and subsequent defense.

    Notes
    May be repeated but only six credits will be applied to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

  
  •  

    KIN 750 - Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Overview of techniques used in historical, descriptive, and experimental research such as those found in exercise science, health, physical education, and recreation research publications. Procedures for formulating a research proposal; hypothesis testing; experimental designs and statistical applications.

  
  •  

    KIN 751 - Selected Application of Statistical Techniques I


    Credits 3

    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical procedures utilized in studies reported in exercise science, health, physical education, and recreation.

  
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    KIN 752 - Selected Application of Statistical Techniques II


    Credits 3

    Statistical analysis techniques including correlation and regression, anova, multivariate analysis, manova for repeated measures designs. Introduction to selected statistical software packages; computer-aided graphics and data presentation techniques.

    Prerequisites
    KIN 751 or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    KIN 754 - Health Science Writing and Communication


    Credits 3

    Effective oral and written communication is essential to the science and practice of health. Learn and apply communication techniques for oral and poster presentations, scientific articles, white papers, and lay summaries.

    Prerequisites
    KIN 750  

  
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    KIN 755 - Research on Physical Activity Behavior


    Credits 3

    Students review the scholarly literature pertaining to physical activity behavior. Papers with special implications for building a general knowledge base requisite to the conduct of research on physical activity behavior are read, discussed, and critically analyzed.

  
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    KIN 760 - Motor Skill Learning and Performance


    Credits 3

    Sensory and central contributions to skilled movement, and practice methods that enhance motor skill learning (e.g., in sports, physical therapy, athletic training, music). Discussions of influential factors such as feedback, attentional focus, unconscious learning, learning through observation, learner autonomy, practice scheduling, social-cognitive-affective influences on learning, and performance under pressure.

  
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    KIN 761 - Human Motor Control


    Credits 3

    Advanced studies in motor control, including sensory and central contributions to movement control, balance, movement observation, focus of attention, mindset, social-cognitive-affective influences on motor performance.

  
  •  

    KIN 762 - Motor Learning Applications


    Credits 3

    Designed to explain basic concepts of motor learning involved in organizing and scheduling practice for efficient learning/teaching of motor skills. Includes discussions of memory, feedback, stages of learning, and other motor learning principles.

  
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    KIN 775 - Internship in Athletic Administration


    Credits 3

    The internship in Athletics is a culminating experience that provides an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills learned in the academic program while working within an athletic administration or related organization. Students will work under the direction of a supervisor in a area related to their selected interest for future employment.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

  
  •  

    KIN 788 - Independent Study


    Credits 1-3

    Independent study of a selected topic in kinesiology and nutrition sciences.

    Notes
    Repeatable up to 6 credits.

  
  •  

    KIN 789 - Dissertation Prospectus


    Credits 3

    Acquaints students with resources available to assist in the conceptualization of research design and literature review in preparation of the formal dissertation proposal.

    Formerly
    PED 796

    Prerequisites
    Admission to doctoral program.

  
  •  

    KIN 790 - Guided Research in Health Sciences


    Credits 3

    immersive research experience where learners participate in all aspects of research from planning, IRB/IACUC, data collection, data analysis, and dissemination.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits.

    Prerequisites
    KIN 750  

  
  •  

    KIN 799 - Dissertation


    Credits 1 – 12

    Culminating research analysis and writing toward completion of dissertation and subsequent defense.

  
  •  

    LAW 502 - Contracts I


    Credits 3

    Overview of basic contract law. Exploration of common law legal method and the structure of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code in the context of issues of contract formation.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 503 - Contracts


    Credits 4

    Overview of basic contract law. Exploration of common law legal method and the structure of Article II of the Uniform Commercial Code in the context of issues of contract formation and interpretation.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 505 - Lawyering Process I


    Credits 1 – 4

    Students are introduced to basic legal research, interviewing skills, effective use of legal authorities in legal analysis and the conventions of predictive legal writing. The course is taught using readings, exercises, simulations, extensive individual feedback and conferences. Students will write several short assignments as well as longer office memos.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 511 - Civil Procedure/Alternative Dispute Resolution I


    Credits 4

    Exploration of the nature and structure of dispute resolution systems, with a focus on formal adjudicatory procedure for civil lawsuits while exposing students to the spectrum and interrelation of dispute resolution systems. Topics covered include jurisdiction, venue, rules of procedure, choice of law.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 515 - Lawyering Process II


    Credits 1 – 4

    Students continue to develop skills in legal research, analysis, reasoning and writing. Focuses on writing persuasively as an advocate, using increasingly complex simulations requiring analysis of statutory and administrative law materials. Assignments include letters to clients and attorneys, a trial court memorandum and an appellate brief, staged to allow for extensive individual feedback and instruction, and an oral argument to a mock appellate court.

    Prerequisites
    LAW 505, majors only; consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 517 - Constitutional Law I


    Credits 3

    Examines judicial review, congressional power under the Commerce, Taxing, and Spending Clauses and section five of the Fourteenth Amendment; substantive due process rights; the role of the states and national government under the Tenth and Eleventh Amendments; and Separation of Powers.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 519 - Contracts II


    Credits 3

    Further exploration of Contracts I with an emphasis on interpretation of contracts.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 521 - Property I


    Credits 4

    Acquisitions of property interest, estates in land and future interests, and landlord tenant.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 523 - Torts


    Credits 4

    Law of civil injuries, including legal protection of personality, property and relational interests against physical, economic, and emotional harms. Emphasis on intentional torts, negligence and strict liability.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 525 - Property II


    Credits 2 – 3

    Real estate transactions, easements and other servitudes, public land use regulation.

    Notes
    May be taken to a maximum of three credits

    Prerequisites
    Majors only, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    LAW 531 - Civil Procedure and Alternative Dispute Resolution II


    Credits 2 – 3

    Continuation of Civil Procedure and Alternative Dispute Resolution I. Topics covered include pretrial practice, pretrial dispositions, and court-imposed alternative dispute resolution mechanisms.

  
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    LAW 602 - American Legal History


    Credits 2 – 3

    Examination of major issues in American legal history such as the role of lawyers in society and the role of law in developing the economy as well as the development of American legal institutions.

    Prerequisites
    Majors only or completion of first-year law courses or consent of instructor.

 

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