Nov 27, 2021  
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Graduate Courses


 
  
  •  

    CIT 780 - Educational Technology Research and Practice


    Credits 3

    Examines the latest research regarding learning and educational technology. Research supported principles will be applied in the development of instructional materials. This course can be taken up to 3 times for a total of 9 credit hours.    

    Prerequisites
    CIT 770  or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 782 - Distance Education Issues and Trends


    Credits 3

    Study of issues, and trends in Distance Education. Examines distance education history, research, practice, and program/course development.

    Prerequisites
    Doctoral status or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CLS 615 - Transfusion Medicine Immunohematology Laboratory


    Credits 3

    Simulated clinical immunohematology laboratory designed to expose the student to the clinical practice of a modern blood bank service. Applied experiences in basic and advanced clinical testing related to common blood group antigens and their associated antibodies, compatibility testing, alloantibody identification, adsorptions/elutions, transfusion reactions and pre/postnatal studies.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 615. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 622 - Clinical Hematology I


    Credits 3

    Basic and diagnostic hematology with an emphasis on pathophysiology. Hematopoiesis, anemias, and hemostasis presented through lectures, case studies and morphologic review of peripheral blood and bone marrow smears. Differential diagnosis of these disorders through specified diagnostic laboratory tests.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 442. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 623 - Clinical Hematology Laboratory I


    Credits 2

    Basic and diagnostic hematology with an emphasis on the laboratory tests used to differentially diagnose various hematologic disorders. Major emphasis on the various anemias and primary hemostatic bleeding disorders. Laboratory unknowns and peripheral/bone marrow microscopic slides used to correlate clinical tests and theoretical principles.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 423. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 624 - Clinical Hematology II


    Credits 3

    Diagnostic hematology and body fluid analysis with emphasis on pathphysiology. Myeloproliferative, lymphoproliferative, myelodysplastic, acute and chronic leukemias and advanced topics in hemostasis presented through lectures, case studies and morphologic review of peripheral blood and bone marrow slides. Differential diagnosis of these disorders through specified laboratory tests.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 424. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 625 - Clinical Hematology Laboratory II


    Credits 2

    Diagnostic hematology and body fluid analysis with an emphasis on the laboratory tests, cytochemical stains, and molecular markers used to differently diagnose the various hematologic malignancies and hemostasis disorders. Laboratory unknowns and peripheral/bone marrow microscopic slides used to correlate clinical tests and theoretic principles.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 425. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 632 - Clinical Microbiology I


    Credits 3

    Introduction to medically significant microbial diseases of man. Microbial physiology and pathogenic interactions between man and microorganism. Epidemiology, triage, and diagnosis of microorganisms causing human diseases. Emphasis is on aerobic and anaerobic bacterial diseases, mycobacteria, vibrios, Legionella, Mycoplasma, spirochetes, Rickettsia and Chlamydia. Includes discussion of antimicrobial therapy and resistance mechanisms.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 432. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 633 - Clinical Microbiology Laboratory I


    Credits 2

    Introduction to isolation, diagnostic and identification techniques for microbial diseases of humans. Emphasis is on aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, mycobacteria, vibrios, Legionella, Mycoplasma, spriochetes, Rickettsia and Chlamydia. Includes conventional microscopic, culture, molecular and immunological techniques as well as susceptibility testing methods.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 433. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 634 - Clinical Microbiology II


    Credits 3

    Advanced medical microbiology. Microbial physiology and pathogenic interactions between man and microorganism. Epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of microrganisms causing human diseases. Emphasis is on fungal, parasitic and viral diseases as well as miscellaneous bacteria from various body sites. Includes discussion of antimicrobial therapy and resistance mechanisms.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 434. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 635 - Clinical Microbiology Laboratory II


    Credits 2

    Advanced practical applications in the recovery, isolation and identification of microorganisms causing human disease. Emphasis is on methods for mycology, parasitology, and virology as well as miscellaneous bacteria from different body sites. Includes conventional microscopic, culture, molecular and immunological techniques as well as susceptibility testing methods.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 435. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 642 - Clinical Chemistry I


    Credits 3

    Chemical analysis indicative of human health and disease. Theory and utilization of biochemical instrumentation including photometry, electrochemical, and electrophoresis. Emphasis placed on method application to analysis of carbohydrates, proteins, electrolytes, liver and pancreatic function.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 442. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 643 - Clinical Chemistry I Laboratory


    Credits 1

    Manual and automated chemical methods used to measure normal and abnormal constituents, such as glucose, electrolytes, and proteins, in blood and body fluids. Use of spectrophotometric techniques, recognition of technical problems and selected abnormalities discussed.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 443. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 644 - Clinical Chemistry II


    Credits 3

    Advanced study of chemical analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids in normal and abnormal physiological conditions. Emphasizes interdependency, physiological conditions affecting test results and clinical significance. Topics include endocrinology, toxicology, and radioimmunoassay.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 444. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 645 - Clinical Chemistry II Laboratory


    Credits 1

    Advanced laboratory applications in chemical analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids in normal and abnormal physiological conditions. Emphasizes interdependency, physiological conditions affecting test results and clinical significance. Topics include endocrinology, toxicology and radioimmunoassay.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 445. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 653 - Seminar in CLS IV


    Credits 2

    Discussion of topics in current clinical laboratory pathology. Individual and group projects used to reinforce concepts for interpretation and correlation of laboratory data to patient care. Includes

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 453. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 681 - Clinical Practicum in Hematology


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of hematology and body fluids. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level cometencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 481. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 682 - Clinical Practicum in Chemistry


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the areas of chemistry, immunology, and urinalysis. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 482. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 683 - Clinical Practicum in Immunohematology


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of immunohematology. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 683. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 684 - Clinical Practicum in Microbiology


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of clinical microbiology, parasitology, and mycology. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 484. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 685 - Advanced Clinical Practicum


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experience in the area of toxicology, flow cytometry, and molecular diagnostics. Clinical practicum in specified affiliated laboratories designed to provide exposure to the student in the specialty areas listed. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 485. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 601 - The Rhetoric of Women’s Rights, 1832-1920


    Credits 3

    Examination of the rhetorical campaign for woman suffrage and women’s rights from the early nineteenth century up to passage of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. Emphasis on identifying, understanding, and evaluating major rhetorical strategies in their historical context.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 401. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    COM 603 - Public Communication


    Credits 3

    Examination of public communication in terms of form, context, people, messages, and delivery. Particular focus on the ethics of public communication.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 403. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 604 - Principles of Persuasion


    Credits 3

    Examination of the principles involved in influencing groups and individuals.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 404. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 607 - Communication Between the Sexes


    Credits 3

    Introduction to gender research in communication, studying ways in which language, interpersonal communication, the media, and various social institutions influence conceptions of gender.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 407. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 610 - Advanced Topics in Relational Communication


    Credits 3

    This course will examine contemporary topics and processes relevant to communication in personal relationships. To improve understanding of the communication process and its implications for the development, maintenance, and termination of close personal relationships, current theory and research will be incorporated. The course will enhance critical thinking and analytical skills.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 410. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 613 - Argumentation


    Credits 3

    Study of advanced argumentation theories and implementation of argumentation practice.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 413. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 614 - Famous Speeches


    Credits 3

    Study of the role of public address in American history. Emphasis on speeches which had a significant effect on American history.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 414. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate Standing.

  
  •  

    COM 615 - Marital & Family Communication


    Credits 3

    This course introduces graduate students to communication processes that occur in the context of marital and family relationships. We will examine definitions of the family, the roles of family members, various types of families that comprise modern society, and a number of current issues that affect families. Students will also become more familiar with communication theory and research both at the disciplinary level but also in the particular area of family communication.
     

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 415. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 625 - Rhetoric and Public Memory


    Credits 3

    This course explores how we use rhetoric to construct, circulate, and contest shared representations of the past. Students will gain an understanding of the foundational concepts in memory studies through class readings and discussions, and they will gain skills of critical, rhetorical analysis by applying these concepts in writing projects.      

    Notes
    May not be repeated for credit.  This course is crosslisted with COM 425. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Grading
    Letter Grade

  
  •  

    COM 632 - Qualitative Research Methods in Communication


    Credits 3

    Survey of qualitative research methods and analysis in communication including interpretive approaches, interviews, focus groups, and fieldwork.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 432. Coursework at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    Admission to the MA Communication Studies program.

  
  •  

    COM 634 - Conflict Management


    Credits 3

    Examination of various types and sources of conflict in interpersonal relationships, the management and resolution of these conflicts through various decision-making models. Practical application of theory emphasized in various classroom exercises.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 434. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 641 - Rhetoric of Dissent


    Credits 3

    Description and analysis of public discourse by agitators and those opposed to agitation. Focus on significant movements for change in recent American history.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 441. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 682 - Security Discourse


    Credits 3

    In a globalized world the ways in which national security is discussed profoundly affects the public life of all individuals. This class examines the language, arguments and practices related to security policy, including but not limited to topics such as the rhetorics of American foreign policy, war, terrorism and nuclear arms.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 482. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 684 - Political Communication


    Credits 3

    Analysis of historical and contemporary political discourse. Addresses such topics as presidential rhetoric, electoral campaigns, ethics in political culture, institutional leadership, publics and public opinion, meditated political speech, legislative debates, political socialization.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 484. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 706 - Seminar in Intercultural Communication


    Credits 3

    Study of theoretical, methodological, practical and service foundations of intercultural communication. Examines complexities and implications of the relationship of culture and communication.

  
  •  

    COM 710 - Survey of Communication Studies


    Credits 3

    Survey of communication disciplines and their interrelationships; past, contemporary, and emerging issues; appropriate research topics, questions, methods, and style.

  
  •  

    COM 711 - Rhetorical-Critical Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Methods of describing, analyzing, interpreting, and judging public discourse. Study critical theory and practice. Research and write original critical essays.

  
  •  

    COM 712 - Empirical Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Fundamentals of scientific philosophy, research design, and data analysis; writing and critiquing research reports.

  
  •  

    COM 725 - College Teaching in Communication


    Credits 3

    Discussion of theory and practice in the teaching of communication in college, particularly entry-level courses.

    Notes
    Required of all graduate teaching assistants.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    COM 730 - Theories of Communication


    Credits 3

    Exploration and explanation of communication phenomena. Survey of theoretical ideas, nature of theory in general, major communication theories and theories relevant to communication, and examines purpose of theory in communication research.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    COM 741 - Social Movements as Rhetorical Form


    Credits 3

    Rhetorical approaches to the study of social movements, examining communicative processes and symbolic action involved in social change. Focuses on theoretical and methodological issues in movement studies as well as on rhetorical documents and practices of several social movements.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    COM 780 - Persuasion


    Credits 3

    Study of theories and applications of persuasion in various fields of social, political, business, religious, and educational activities.

  
  •  

    COM 781 - Seminar in Argumentation


    Credits 3

    Examines field of argument from its roots in classical Aristotelian rationalism to modern practical reasoning perspectives. Argumentation in interpersonal and public contexts emphasized.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    COM 784 - Political Communication


    Credits 3

    Study of relationship of rhetorical communication theory to political discourse. Focus on political campaigns, presidential rhetoric, and media influences.

  
  •  

    COM 789 - Selected Topics in Communication


    Credits 3

    Content varies with current developments in communication theory.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits with instructor’s permission.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    COM 793 - Independent Study


    Credits 1 – 3

    Supervised study and practical experience in subjects and projects determined in consultation with a faculty member. Students wishing to take this course must consult with the faculty member prior to registration.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of three credits.

  
  •  

    COM 794 - Special Readings


    Credits 3

    Content dependent upon the instructor’s interest and expertise, as well as student interest and requirements.

  
  •  

    COM 797 - Thesis


    Credits 3

    This course is approved for use in graduate programs for Master of Arts candidates.

    Notes
    May be repeated but only six credits applied to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

  
  •  

    CRJ 605 - History of Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Historical development of criminal justice. Several eras reviewed, including the colonial period (up to 1815), nineteenth century, early twentieth century (up to 1940), and the modern era (1940-present).

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 405. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 611 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems


    Credits 3

    Analysis of the development, function, and problems of foreign criminal justice systems. Emphasis on comparisons to the American system.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 411. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 628 - Women and Crime


    Credits 3

    Women as offenders and as processed through the criminal justice system; women as victims and the response of the criminal justice system and the community.

    Same as
    WMST 428

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 428. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 636 - Sociology of Law


    Credits 3

    Study of the social nature of law, the relationship of law to social organization, law as a mechanism of social change, and the interrelationship between social factors and legal processes.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 436. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 641 - Social Science in Law


    Credits 3

    Use of social science as a tool for a legal analysis. Examines the utility of empirical research in determining substantive legal issues such as community defenses, the use of offender profiles in criminal procedure, the death penalty and the size of juries.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 441. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 700 - Proseminar in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Provides an introduction to graduate studies in Criminal Justice. Students are exposed to information regarding the main components of the criminal justices system, including: law enforcement, courts, and the correctional system.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice.

  
  •  

    CRJ 701 - Proseminar on Theory


    Credits 3

    History of criminological thought. Contemporary and classical theories of crime. Attention to social, cultural, and psychological perspectives.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 702 - Proseminar on Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Methods and applications of quantitative and qualitative research. Relationships among theory, research, and social policy. Development and interpretation of research reports.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor and satisfactory completion of an undergraduate course in research methods.

  
  •  

    CRJ 703 - Proseminar on Statistics


    Credits 3

    Univariate and multivariate techniques. Use of computerized statistical packages in the social and behavioral sciences. Practical applications in statistical problem-solving using primary and secondary data sources.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor and satisfactory completion of an undergraduate statistics course.

  
  •  

    CRJ 704 - Proseminar on Law and Social Control


    Credits 3

    Nature of law and legal institutions. Relationships between law and other forms of social control. Theory and research on the development and implementation of law.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 705 - Proseminar on the Administration of Justice


    Credits 3

    Structures, functions, and operations of criminal justice organizations. Formal and informal organizational structures and their relationships to the broader social, political, and legal institutions.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 706 - Seminar on the Nature of Crime


    Credits 3

    Investigation of selected theoretical perspectives and particular types of crime and criminality.

    Notes
    Specific subject matter varies by semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 707 - Policing


    Credits 3

    Police organization and subculture, occupational socialization, police community relations, occupational deviance, policy formation, and related issues discussed.

    Notes
    Specific subject matter varies by semester.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 708 - Seminar on Law and Legal Process


    Credits 3

    Development and implementation of criminal law. May focus on issues related to the legislative process, the criminal courts, case law, and legal reform.

    Notes
    Specific subject matter varies by semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 709 - Delinquency and Juvenile Justice


    Credits 3

    Historical development and current practices of juvenile courts and treatment institutions. Emphasis on the relationship between delinquency theory, research, and policy formulation, with particular attention to programs of delinquency prevention.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 710 - Crime and Its Control in Gambling


    Credits 3

    Analytical approach to patterns of gambling in America,nature of organized crime involvement, and development and implementation of forms of social control of organized crime in the area. Particular attention given to patterns of crime and regulatory control in Nevada gambling.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 711 - Criminological Research


    Credits 3

    Correlates of crime and theory-based research on crime causation. Implications for the major theoretical perspectives.

    Prerequisites
      and  , graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 712 - Punishment and Corrections


    Credits 3

    Philosophies and practices of punishment and corrections. Contemporary theory, the prison environment, work and rehabilitation programs, parole, overcrowding, capital punishment, and alternatives to imprisonment.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 713 - Victimization


    Credits 3

    Problems confronted by victims of crime. The role of the victim in criminal offenses. Policy, advocacy issues, and victims’ rights.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 714 - Proseminar on Law and Criminal Justice Theory


    Credits 3

    This seminar introduces major theories and paradigms within the disciplines of law and society, and criminal justice. It examines the social and historical context in which these theories were formed, illustrates the basic elements necessary for theory construction or testing, and critically assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the theories.

    Prerequisites
      and  , Graduate standing in criminal justice, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 715 - Criminal Justice Policy


    Credits 3

    Contemporary policies in criminal justice. Relationships among theory, policy, and practice. Attention to public opinion, legislative process, law enforcement administration, the courts, appellate review, issues of intergroup conflict, and civil rights.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 716 - Graduate Readings in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    With faculty supervision, students pursue a personalized program of readings related to specific issues in criminal justice.

    Prerequisites
      and   and Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 718 - History of Criminology


    Credits 3

    Explores the development of the discipline of criminology from its European origin in the Middle Ages and Renaissance up to the work of the leading criminologists and perspectives in the 20th century.

  
  •  

    CRJ 719 - Proseminar on Advanced Statistics


    Credits 3

    Overview of advanced statistical models such as Generalized Linear Model (Poisson, Negative binomial), Multilevel Models (Hierarchical Linear/Nonlinear Models), and Structural Equation Models. Introduction to advanced data analysis using STATA and M-plus programs. Application of advanced statistical methods to diverse secondary data.

    Prerequisites
    CRJ 703  or consent of the instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 720 - Drug Policies in the United States


    Credits 3

    Explores efforts to deal with the drug problem in America, covering especially the history of drug use and drug policies. Examination of the impact of drug policies racial minorities and poor communities. Focus on recent legislative developments and the overall impact on society will also be included.

  
  •  

    CRJ 724 - Applied Research in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Survey of research and statistical methods appropriate for evaluating criminal justice programs. Nature and role of program evaluation; impact and process assessment; presentation and interpretation of statistical results, ethics and politics of evaluation research.

    Prerequisites
        

  
  •  

    CRJ 733 - Criminal Justice Teaching Practicum


    Credits 3

    Provides an overview of effective teaching and mentoring strategies for those who will teach in justice-related fields. Emphasis is placed on developing learning activities that build discipline-specific skills and support clear course objectives.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 794 - Doctoral Comprehensive Examination


    Credits 3

    Doctoral students must pass a written comprehensive examination designed to test students’ ability to synthesize a body of knowledge in criminology and criminal justice. May be repeated up to six credits.

    Grading
    Satisfactory/Fail

    Prerequisites
    Department approval

  
  •  

    CRJ 795 - Dissertation


    Credits 1-9

    Research, analysis, and writing toward completion of the dissertation and preparation for subsequent oral defense. Students are required to complete eighteen credits for their doctoral degree; may register for additional credits that will not count toward degree.

    Grading
    S/F grading only

    Prerequisites
    Department consent

  
  •  

    CRJ 796 - Comprehensive Examination


    Credits 3

    As part of the requirements for the Professional Degree Program, students must pass a written comprehensive examination designed to test students’ ability to synthesize a body of knowledge in criminal justice.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
         

  
  •  

    CRJ 797 - Master’s Thesis in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3 or 6

    Development of a research design and analysis of data relating to an issue of theoretical and empirical significance. Students expected to display the ability to integrate the elements of the core courses and related program of study.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
        , and   and Graduate standing in criminal justice, consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 798 - Applied Project in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Research application in criminal justice or an evaluation of a specific criminal justice program.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
         , and  

  
  •  

    CRJ 799 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3 or 6

    Directed research on an issue of contemporary significance in criminal justice, culminating in the development of a research paper.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
      and   and Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CS 617 - Introduction to Computer Simulation


    Credits 3

    Simulation as a tool for the investigation of random phenomena. Emphasis on discrete simulation. Preparation of input for simulation and analysis of results. Use of SIMSCRIPT for discrete simulation. Comparison of discrete and continuous simulation. Simulation problems in several disciplines examined in detail.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 417. Credit at the 600-level requries additional work.

  
  •  

    CS 620 - Human-Computer Interaction


    Credits 3

    Overview of human-computer interaction principles, guidelines, methods, and tools. User research, low-fidelity prototyping, participatory design, usability evaluation, visual design, usability principles, and affordances. Graphical user interface implementation, including design patterns, event handling, widget tool kits, languages, and development environments.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 420. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of Instructor

  
  •  

    CS 641 - Advanced Internet Programming


    Credits 2

    Advanced Internet programming design and applications including client/server technologies and environment and software, client/server network operating systems, client/server database management systems, data warehousing environments, data mining, basic networking models and protocols, CASE tools, Groupware, Middleware, Internet security, privacy considerations.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 441. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CS 641L - Advanced Internet Programming Lab


    Credits 1

    Helps student develop practical skills and learn to apply industry-wide standards and practices for advanced Internet and Internet 2 applications.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 441L. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CS 643 - Information Assurance


    Credits 3

    Introduction to the principles of information assurance. Security awareness, Survey of information security technologies, cryptography, management and administration techniques necessary to improve information security and respond to a security breach, survey of threats to information security, privacy in computing, legal and ethical issues relating to information security, and case studies.

    Same as
    CS 443

  
  •  

    CS 645 - Internet Security


    Credits 3

    Internet security theory and practice, advanced IP concepts, the concepts of stimulus and response in the context of securing a network, network packet and traffic analysis, internet protocol (IP) vulnerabilities, packet filtering, intrusion detection, internet exploits, exploit signatures, internet forensics, network security investigation.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 445. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 648 - Computer Security


    Credits 3

    Overview of computer security, threats, vulnerabilities and controls. Physical security, computer security policies and implementation plans, and computer forensics including penetration testing and investigation. Management issues. Legal, privacy and ethical issues.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 448. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 649 - Computer and Network Forensics


    Credits 3

    Basics of Computer Forensics and Network Forensics. How to protect your privacy on the internet: Email, obfuscation, web sites and servers. Encryption, data hiding, and hostile code. Investigating Windows and Unix. File system recovery/analysis and file management in different OSes. Technical and legal issues regarding digital evidence collection and forensics analysis.  This course is crosslisted with CS 449. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.




    Prerequisites
    CS 645  or CS 648 

  
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    CS 651 - Multimedia Systems Design


    Credits 2

    Theory and practice of multimedia system design overview. High-level topics include multimedia content and formats, underlying technologies, digital cinematography, scripting, storyboarding, CD-ROM production and online publication, porting multimedia to the Web. Emphasis on the design process and the seamless integration of content in an interactive environment.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 451. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 651L - Multimedia Systems Design Lab


    Credits 1

    Helps student develop practical skills and learn to apply industry-wide standards and practices for the design of multimedia systems.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 451L. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 656 - Automata and Formal Languages


    Credits 3

    Regular expressions. Regular, context-free, and unrestricted grammars. Finite and pushdown automata. Turing machines and the halting problem; introduction to decidability.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 456. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 657 - Database Management Systems


    Credits 3

    Concepts and structures necessary for design and implementation of a database management system. Survey of current database management systems and use of a DBMS.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 457. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 660 - Compiler Construction


    Credits 3

    Current methods in the design and implementation of compilers. Construction of the components of an actual compiler as a term project.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 460. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 663 - Computer Architecture


    Credits 3

    Introduction to computer architecture. Topics include basic computer organization concepts; history and taxonomy of computer architectures; language and software influences on architecture; instruction set design; stack, array, data flow, and database machines; multiprocessor and network architectures; and fault tolerant designs.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 463. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
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    CS 665 - Computer Networks I


    Credits 3

    An introduction to the design and implementation of computer communication networks, their protocols and applications. It covers the technologies and standards in data transmission, telecommunication networks, network architectures, networking hardware, wireless networks, and the basis of the Internet including UDP and TCP as well as a number of application protocols.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 465. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    CS 370

  
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    CS 666 - Computer Networks II


    Credits 3

    Explores advanced topics in computer networks, the protocols, algorithms, hardware, and performance issues, especially in TCP/IP networks. Details of IP routing algorithms, quality of service, protocol implementation issues, router architecture and types, various TCP versions and their performance, the related telecommunication networks, and wireless technologies are discussed.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 466. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    CS 665 or CS 465

  
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    CS 669 - Introduction to Digital Image Processing


    Credits 3

    Background and basics of digital image processing. Topics include: the human visual system, image representation, sampling, image mathematics, and geometry, image enhancement, smoothing and sharpening, the fast Fourier transform, and a survey of image restoration methods.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 469. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    MATH 365 and STAT 411 and CS 117 or CS 135

  
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    CS 670 - Networks and Distributed Systems


    Credits 3

    Explores protocols and experiments with creating and implementing new protocols. In addition, students will be introduced to concepts such as deadlocks in networks/distributed applications, communication in distributed systems (among other RPC/RMI and the client server model in more detail), synchronization, reliability, transparency, and atomicity/transaction semantics.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CS 470. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

 

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