Jul 18, 2024  
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2012-2014 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Courses


 
  
  • PGM 401 - PGA PGM Level 3 continued


    Provides PGM students with knowledge, theory, and application of fundamental concepts in golf management specific to: food and beverage control, player development programs, the teaching business, advanced teaching, and golf club fitting.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PGM 411 - PGA/PGMTM level 3


    Provides PGM students with knowledge, theory and application of the fundamental concepts in golf operations specific to: swing concepts of teaching, supervising and delegating, merchandise and inventory management, and food and beverage control. Students will complete a work experience portfolio as a requirement of PGA/PGMTM level 3 testing.

    Credits 2
    Prerequisites RLS 110, 201, 301.
  
  • PGM 462 - PGM Internship IV


    Internship is a full-time, 40 hour per week, academic experience at an approved golf facility. Internship will provide a culmination of professional experiences covering all learning outcomes of the PGA PGM level 1, 2, and 3 curriculum.

    Credits 1-6
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PGM 463 - A-E Professional Golf Management Internship I-V


    Internship is a full-time, 40 hour per week, academic experience at an approved golf facility. Internship sites offer variety of professional experiences in the operation and management of the: facility, member relations, golf retailing, food and beverage, turf grass, and tournaments. Course repeatable up to 12 credits. Students must complete 12 credits of internship.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Admission to PGM Concentration. PGM 463 A, B and C: 2 credits each. PGM 463D and E:
    Notes PGM 463D and PGM 463E are both 3 credit courses.
  
  • PHIL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy


    Study of selected great philosophers or basic problems involving imaginative and critical interpretations of experience and reality.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 102 - Critical Thinking and Reasoning


    Introduction to the analysis and evaluation of actual arguments, to the practice of constructing logically sound arguments, and to logic as the theory of argument. Emphasizes arguments of current or general interest.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 105 - Evidence and Inductive Reasoning


    Introductory study of concrete issues, involving the analysis of evidence, causal explanation, statistical inference, generalization, and probability. Emphasizes issues in such areas as the law, the sciences, economics, and education.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 114 - Introduction to Symbolic Logic


    Formerly Listed as PHIL 109.

    Principles of correct reasoning, using modern symbolic techniques of propositional calculus and simple quantification.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 115 - Philosophy of Death and Dying


    Philosophical study of the language and theories of death, and of cultural attitudes and beliefs, including preparation for death, fear of death, and the possibility of immortality.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 117 - Indian Philosophy of Mind and Mental Health


    Critical discussion of philosophical psychology and practices leading to self-realization; contemporary neurophysiology and psychology, including concepts of self, mind, psychosomatic health and knowledge (Jnana).

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 124 - Philosophical Traditions of Asia


    Study of the nature of self, mind, knowledge, truth, logic and related themes characteristic of India, China, Japan, or any other Asian country; any one of these may be taught separately.

    Credits 3
    May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits.
  
  • PHIL 130 - Topics in Philosophy or Religion


    Study of special topics in philosophy or religion taken at the introductory level (e.g., philosophy of atheism, ethics of euthanasia, abortion, etc.).

    Credits (1-3)
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
  
  • PHIL 135 - Introduction to Ethics


    Historical and critical introduction to ethics from ancient Greece and Biblical ethics to the present. Includes such topics as conscience and self-betrayal, formation of character, integrity, trust, justice, and corruption.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 203 - Existentialism


    Series of currents and thinkers in contemporary philosophy examined in order to explore the concept of human existence and life in the work of Kierkegaard, Dilthey, and Nietzsche. Other philosophers include Jaspers, Heidegger, Sartre, and Ortega Y Gasset.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 205 - Science and Religion


    Selected problems and episodes in the interaction between science and religion, such as the seventeenth-century condemnation of Galileo, the eighteenth-century controversy about natural religion, and the recent creation-evolution debate in the United States.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 210 - World Religions


    Critical introduction to the nature of religion. Special emphasis placed on the role of myths, symbols, ritual, religious experience, and religious institutions. Selected topics of the literature of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, or Islam studied.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 217 - Introduction to the Study of Marxism


    Fundamentals of Marx’s views; their philosophical, political, and economic origins and implications; their connection to communism, Leninism, and socialism; objections by Croce, Popper, Hook, etc.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 225 - Introduction to Indian Philosophy


    Introductory critical survey of the classical schools of Indian philosophy such as the Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, Samkhya Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisesika, Mimansa, Vedanta, Jainism, Buddhism, and such recent thinkers as Gandhi.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 242 - Ethics For Engineers and Scientists


    Ethical issues (e.g., whistle blowing, the environment) that commonly arise in engineering and science practice. Ethical theory, followed by case-study centered discussions designed to hone students’ abilities to recognize and articulate ethical problems and to utilize institutional supports for ethical behavior that already exist in the professional environment.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 245 - Contemporary Moral Issues


    Introduction to ethics by way of such current issues as war and atrocity, the purpose of the university, racism, women’s liberation, violence and aggression, the notions of happiness and success, or ethics of ecology.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 247 - Philosophy and Women


    Variety of philosophical writings by or about women, from Plato to the present, focusing on such key concepts as nature, equality, dignity, freedom, love, and self-realization; may include feminist critiques of the Western philosophical tradition.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 249 - Environmental Ethics


    Explores fundamental concepts of human obligations toward other life forms and ecosystems. Includes such issues as rights of animals, plants, and inanimate objects; endangered species; water, soil, and air quality; toxic and other wastes; vegetarianism; global warming.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 302 - Intermediate Critical Thinking and Reasoning


    Designed to extend the theory and practice of reasoned argument by the analysis, evaluation, reconstruction, and construction of extended examples drawn from such fields as philosophy, literature, religion, natural and social sciences, the arts, or contemporary affairs.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHIL 310 - Great Philosophers


    Explores Western philosophy from its ancient Greek beginnings to the present, focusing on the questions, the times, and the achievements of great philosophers.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 311 - Professional Ethics


    Ethical problems current in the law, medicine, finance, government, journalism, and business, with particular emphasis on the classics of our ethical heritage.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHIL 320 - Philosophy of Law


    Study of the meaning of law, particularly legal reasoning, positive and normative functions of the law, and the nature of justice. Such legal theorists as Plato, Aquinas, Hobbes, Kant, Hegel, Hart, and Dworkin studied.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHIL 322 - Inductive Logic and Probability


    Examination of the methods of inductive logic. Alternative concepts of probability. Study of mathematical probability and a study of such topics as the problem of induction, confirmation, and simplicity. Relevance of inductive logic to scientific method.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHIL 330 - Computers and Culture


    Investigates how the computer revolution influences the understanding of people as rational and moral agents. Covers computation and symbol manipulation; artificial intelligence and the mechanization of reason; robotics; virtual realities; and informational complexity.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 342 - Phenomenology


    Study of the phenomenological method and its application in such fields as social sciences, aesthetics, value theory and theory of science.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 345 - Health Care Ethics


    Decision-making about ethics in medical contexts. Addresses intensely personal issues such as pain and suffering, death, God and family relations. Topics include euthanasia, genetic screening, distribution of resources, organ transplants and reproductive technologies.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 352 - Special Topics


    Intensive study of one major problem in philosophy.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
    May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.
  
  • PHIL 356 - Theories of Culture


    (Same as CST 301 and  .) Study of the nature of culture norms, with reference to art, language, communication, religion, science, etc. Examination of the theoretical underpinnings of the study of culture in the humanities, the social sciences, and in “cultural studies.”

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 401 - Ancient Philosophy


    Philosophy from the pre-Socratics to Plotinus, including the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, Stoics, Skeptics, and early Christian writers.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 402 - Medieval Philosophy


    Philosophy from Augustine to Nicholas of Cusa, including Boethius, Pseudo-Dionysius, John Scotus Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Avicenna, Moses Maimonides, Averroes, Bonaventure, Roger Bacon, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Ockham.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHIL 403 - Early Modern Philosophy


    Renaissance and early modern philosophy from the Italian Renaissance to Kant, including such figures as Leonardo, Pico, Erasmus, Luther, Montaigne, Descartes, Bacon, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Vico, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 404 - Nineteenth-Century Philosophy


    Study of the major philosophers and philosophical currents of the nineteenth century introduced first by Kant’s critical period; the movement from Kant through Hegel’s absolute idealism; other important currents, including historical materialism (Marx), positivism (Comte), utilitarianism (Bentham, Mill), and pragmatism (C.S. Peirce).

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 405 - Contemporary Philosophy


    Study of the movements of twentieth-century thought: Vitalism, neo-Kantianism, dialectical materialism, phenomenology, existentialism, neopositivism, analysis, neo-Thomism, and American naturalism and pragmatism.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 406 - American Philosophy


    Development of philosophy in America from the Transcendentalists and the St. Louis School through Royce, Peirce, James, Dewey, and Santayana.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 410 - Plato


    Analysis of selected dialogues.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Three credits of upper-division philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 411 - Aristotle


    Analysis of selected treatises.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Three credits of upper-division philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 415 - Kant


    Intensive study of one or more of Kant’s major writings; e.g., the Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Practical Reason, Critique of Judgement, Metaphysics of Morals.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites 6 credits of Philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 420 - Logical Theory


    Systematic logical investigation of topics including necessity and possibility, moral obligation and permission, belief and knowledge, semantic paradoxes (e.g., Liar), vagueness, theories of truth, the analysis of conditionals and quantifiers, deviant or non-classical logics, contradiction, theoretical commitments, theories of argument and informal logic, tense and time, or related material.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHIL 422 - Advanced Logic


    Study of formal logic through first-order logic with identity. Soundness, completeness, compactness and other metatheorems. Other topics may include computability, modal logic, epistemic logic, many-valued logic, the logic of conditionals, higher-order logics, infinitary logics or non-monotonic logics, number theory, Gödel’s theorems, and the limits of logicism.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHIL 425 - Philosophy of Language


    Nature, acquisition and structure of language, including such philosophical issues as meaning, reference, speech acts and semantics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 430 - Philosophy of Science


    Study of the nature of scientific method and theory construction, and of causality, explanation, determinism, indeterminism, and probability.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 431 - History of Scientific Thought


    Study of selected topics in the history of science, such as the impact of Euclidean geometry, the Copernican Revolution, the origin of modern science, the development of non-Euclidean geometry, the transition from classical to modern physics, and the rise of evolutionary biology.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 432 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences


    Study of problems confronted by social scientists such as cultural relativism, methodological individualism, whether social sciences resemble natural sciences, and the role of value judgments in research.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 433 - Philosophical Psychology


    Study of the nature of human consciousness, mind, and intention, and their interrelation with perception and action with reference to relevant scientific findings of artificial intelligence and brain-behavior relationships.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 434 - Philosophy of Cognitive Science


    Critical assessment of interdisciplinary approaches to topics such as the philosophy of: innate knowledge, memory, mental representation, artificial intelligence, rationality, intentionality, and parallel computation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 435 - Philosophy of Mind


    Study of issues such as the mind-body problems, consciousness, intention, meaning, explaining human action, artificial intelligence, and roles of imagery, language and computer-like processing in cognition.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper division standing and 3 credits of philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 437 - Philosophy of History


    (Same as  .) Theory, epistemology, and methodology of historiography, dealing with such questions as the nature, aims, and methods of history; its status as a science; the legitimacy of the so-called speculative philosophy of history; and the structure of historical knowledge.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  , or   or  , or six credits of history.
  
  • PHIL 440 - Theory of Knowledge


    Study of how we know. Includes such problems as belief, evidence, perception, skepticism, and other minds.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 441 - Metaphysics


    Study of theories of being, including such problems as substance, emanation, participation, essence, universals, process and time. Covers such philosophers as Aristotle, Plotinus, Leibniz, Whitehead, and Heidegger.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 446 - Social and Political Philosophy


    Traditional and contemporary interpretations of the nature of society and the state, and analysis of important concepts such as liberty, justice, law, and right.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 450 - Ethical Theory


    Study of philosophical theories of human conduct and character, together with relations of ethical theory and moral action.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 452 - Aesthetics


    Study of aesthetic standards, the nature of art and artistic creativity, and the function of art in human experience.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 459 - Philosophy of Religion


    Study of conceptions of God and of the nature and meaning of religious experience.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or 120.
  
  • PHIL 467 - Indian Philosophy


    Critical study of classical Indian philosophy of the Vedic and non-Vedic schools with special reference to their epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Includes such topics as the philosophy of the Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, Samkhya Yoga, Vedanta, Jainism, Buddhism, and contemporary thinkers.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 468 - Chinese and Japanese Philosophy


    Study of Confucianism, Taoism, the School of Names, Legalist School, Ch’an Buddhism, Shintoism, Zen Buddhism, and contemporary issues.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
  
  • PHIL 469 - Gandhian Welfare Philosophy and Culture


    (Same as SWK 493.) Introduction to the chosen topics in Gandhian welfare philosophy. Ethical, moral, social, and political foundations of Gandhian thought explored and their applications to problem resolution strategies and peaceful change at different levels demonstrated.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHIL 472 - Selected Topics in Religion


    Intensive study of one major topic in religion.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites Six credits in philosophy.
  
  • PHIL 482 - Living Philosophers Colloquium


    This one credit course exposes students to the work of living philosophers working in the profession today, by having them attend a series of lectures, each given by a different professional philosopher. Prerequite: At least one prior philosophy course.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites Prior course in Philosophy.
    May be repeated to a maximum of four credits.
    Notes S/F grading only.
  
  • PHIL 499 - Directed Study


    Directed study in selected problems in philosophy under the supervision of one or more members of the department. Student must submit to the proposed instructor a written prospectus of some research problem.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.
    Notes Topic must be discussed with and approved by the instructor prior to registration.
  
  • PHYS 108 - Physics For A Better Environment


    This is a survey course on energy issues, including the challenges facing us today. Simple physics will be introduced to analyze production and consumption of energy and their impact on the environment. The level is set for beginning students in any field.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHYS 108L - Physics for a Better Environment Laboratory


    Laboratory exercises on energy issues, including the challenges facing us today. Simple physics experiments will be used to analyze the work-energy relationship, energy conservation, and environment related energy problems.

    Credits 1
    Prerequisites  , or concurrent registration in  .
  
  • PHYS 120 - Introduction to Einstein’s Spacetime


    Algebra-based exploration of Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity covering time dilation, length contraction, the addition of velocities, the Lorenz transformation, the Twin Paradox, Minkowski space-time diagrams, and other topics time permitting. Beauty and consistency of Special Relativity emphasized.

    Credits 3
  
  • PHYS 151 - General Physics I


    General physics intended primarily for students in liberal arts, medicine, and the biological sciences. Lecture and laboratory exercises in mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   or equivalent, or placement test. PHYS 151/   is prerequisite for /152L   /  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • PHYS 151L - General Physics I


    General physics intended primarily for students in liberal arts, medicine, and the biological sciences. Lecture and laboratory exercises in mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

    Credits 0
    Prerequisites   or equivalent, or placement test.    /151L  is prerequisite for   .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • PHYS 152 - General Physics II


    General physics intended primarily for students in liberal arts, medicine, and the biological sciences. Lecture and laboratory exercises in mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

    Credits 4
    Prerequisites   or equivalent, or placement test.    is prerequisite for PHYS 152/  .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • PHYS 152L - General Physics II


    General physics intended primarily for students in liberal arts, medicine, and the biological sciences. Lecture and laboratory exercises in mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

    Credits 0
    Prerequisites   or equivalent, or placement test.     is prerequisite for   /152L .
    Lab/Lecture/Studio Hours Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.
  
  • PHYS 180 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers I


    Lecture in Newtonian mechanics. Rectilinear motion, particle dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational mechanics, oscillations, wave motion, and gravitation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites  .
  
  • PHYS 180L - Physics for Scientists and Engineers Lab I


    Laboratory exercises in Newtonian mechanics. Rectilinear motion, particle dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational mechanics, oscillations, wave motion, and gravitation.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • PHYS 181 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers II


    Lecture in electromagnetism. Coulomb’s law, electric and magnetic fields, Gauss’ law, potential, capacitance, current and resistance, electromotive force, inductance, motion of charged particles, introduction to Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • PHYS 181L - Physics for Scientists and Engineers Lab II


    Laboratory exercises in electromagnetism, Coulomb’s law, electric and magnetic fields, Gauss’ law, potential, capacitance, current and resistance, electromotive force, inductance, motion of charged particles, introduction to Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • PHYS 182 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers III


    Lecture in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and optics. Sound, temperature and thermometry, heat, gases, intermolecular forces, kinetic theory, entropy, nature of light, geometrical optics, physical optics including diffraction and interference, introduction to modern developments.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   and  .
  
  • PHYS 182L - Physics for Scientists and Engineers Lab III


    Laboratory exercises in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and optics. Sound, temperature and thermometry, heat, gases, intermolecular forces, kinetic theory, entropy, nature of light, geometrical optics, physical optics including diffraction and interference, introduction to modern developments.

    Credits 1
    Corequisites  .
  
  • PHYS 191 - Directed Study


    Individual projects under the direction of a faculty member.

    Credits (1-3)
    Prerequisites Three credits of physics.
    Notes Department approval must be obtained prior to registration.
  
  • PHYS 250 - Special Relativity


    In-depth introduction to the space time of special relativity with emphasis on coherence brought about by the union of three-dimensional Euclidean space time to form a four-dimensional space.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites   or consent of instructor.
  
  • PHYS 300 - Introduction to Physics and Scientific Computing


    Basic concepts and methods in solving scientific problems in physics and other disciplines computationally. Emphasis on problems not commonly solvable by analytical means. Hands-on experience with real-life problems in physics and scientific computing.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 152, PHYS 152L or PHYS 180, PHYS 180L.
  
  • PHYS 350 - Introduction to General Relativity


    Physics in and around black holes is used as a vehicle for learning about the implications of general relativity.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 250 or consent of instructor.
  
  • PHYS 404 - Computational Techniques in Physics


    Application of numerical methods to simulation of physical systems, including topics in classical mechanics, electrostatics, quantum mechanics, scattering, nonlinear dynamics and chaos.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 181, PHYS 182 and experience with high-level programming language.
  
  • PHYS 411 - Modern Physics I


    Those aspects of quantum and statistical mechanics and relativity necessary to describe the changes in the physicist’s world view wrought by revolutionary theories early in the last century.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 181, PHYS 181L, PHYS 182, PHYS 182L.
  
  • PHYS 412 - Modern Physics II


    Continuation of the survey of twentieth-century developments in physics. Topics include simple molecular quantum mechanics, quantum statistics, solids, superfluids and superconductors, nuclear processes and models, and elementary particle physics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 411.
  
  • PHYS 413 - Intermediate Laboratory I


    Experimental investigation of a variety of phenomena involving the properties of electrons and their interactions with fields and matter, including selected quantum and wave mechanical effects. Experiments designed to reinforce theory learned in previous courses and to develop laboratory techniques.

    Credits 3
    Corequisites PHYS 411.
  
  • PHYS 414 - Intermediate Laboratory II


    Further experimental investigations of phenomena in classical and modern physics. Emphasis on problem solving, experimental technique, data analysis, and independent work. Students encouraged to alter or extend the experiments and engage in projects.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 413.
  
  • PHYS 421 - Electricity and Magnetism I


    Electrostatics, magnetic fields, and electromagnetism. Maxwell’s equations, theory of metallic conduction, motion of charged particles, radiation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 181, PHYS 421 is prerequisite for PHYS 422.
  
  • PHYS 422 - Electricity and Magnetism II


    Electrostatics, magnetic fields, and electromagnetism. Maxwell’s equations, theory of metallic conduction, motion of charged particles, radiation.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 181, PHYS 421 is prerequisite for PHYS 422.
  
  • PHYS 423 - Mechanics I


    Newtonian mechanics. Mathematical formulation of the dynamics of a particle and systems of particles, including applications to atomic physics. Mechanics of continuous media using Fourier series. Introduction to generalized coordinates and the methods of Lagrange and Hamilton.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 180. PHYS 423 is prerequisite for PHYS 424.
  
  • PHYS 424 - Mechanics II


    Newtonian mechanics. Mathematical formulation of the dynamics of a particle and systems of particles, including applications to atomic physics. Mechanics of continuous media using Fourier series. Introduction to generalized coordinates and the methods of Lagrange and Hamilton.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 180. PHYS 423 is prerequisite for PHYS 424.
  
  • PHYS 426 - Physics of Solids


    Structure of crystalline solids. Mechanical, thermal, and electric properties of conducting and non-conducting solids.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 411.
  
  • PHYS 431 - Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics


    Survey of basic nuclear concepts and structure. Interactions between nuclear radiations and matter, nuclear reactions and decay, nuclear force, sub-atomic structure and models, symmetries and conservation laws.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 411.
  
  • PHYS 441 - Mathematical Physics


    Application of selected mathematical techniques to problems in physics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 181.
  
  • PHYS 442 - Mathematical Physics II


    Application of selected mathematical techniques to problems in physics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 181, PHYS 441.
  
  • PHYS 451 - Modern Scientific Instrumentation


    Electronics for scientists, including circuit design and construction using analog and digital integrated circuits. Introduction to machining, glassblowing, and fabrication techniques.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 181, PHYS 181L, PHYS 182, PHYS 182L, PHYS 422.
  
  • PHYS 461 - Light and Physical Optics


    Survey of geometric optics and optical instruments. Selected topics in physical optics including interference, diffraction and polarization, with applications; the nature of light.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 182.
  
  • PHYS 462 - Modern Optics and Photonics


    Laser principles and applications. Non-linear optics, image formation, optical transfer function, and Fourier optics. Introduction to quantum optics.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 461.
  
  • PHYS 467 - Thermodynamics


    Fundamentals of thermodynamics, including equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, and entropy. Principles and methods of temperature measurement, calorimetry and heat transfer.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 182.
  
  • PHYS 468 - Statistical Mechanics


    Principles and applications of statistical mechanics. Quantum statistics of ideal gas and simple solids. Transport theory, irreversible processes and fluctuations.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 467.
  
  • PHYS 481 - Quantum Mechanics I


    Introduction to the Schroedinger Equation and the interpretation of its solutions, the uncertainty principles, one-dimensional problems, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, the hydrogen atom.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 422 and PHYS 424.
  
  • PHYS 482 - Quantum Mechanics II


    Introduction to the matrix formulation of quantum mechanics, spin, coupling of angular momenta and applications. Time dependent perturbation theory and approximation methods and techniques discussed.

    Credits 3
    Prerequisites PHYS 481.
 

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