Dec 07, 2022  
2014-2015 Graduate Catalog 
    
2014-2015 Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

Graduate Courses


 
  
  •  

    CIT 600 - Topics in Educational Technology:


    Credits 1 - 6

    Specialized course that explores current educational technology topics.

  
  •  

    CIT 601 - Technology Applications Elementary Curriculum


    Credits 3

    Study of issues and applications of digital technologies in elementary schools. Students will explore appropriate uses of technology and gain hands-on experience in developing instructional activities using technology applications.

    Formerly
    CIT 701

    Same as
       

  
  •  

    CIT 602 - Technology Applications Secondary Curriculum


    Credits 3

    Study of issues and applications of digital technologies in secondary schools. Students will explore appropriate uses of technology and gain hands-on experience in developing instructional activities using technology applications.

    Formerly
    CIT 702

    Same as
      

  
  •  

    CIT 604 - Nevada Technology Leadership Conference


    Credits 1

    Annual conference to bring together educators interested in enhancing teaching and learning with computer-based technology. Presentations of timely topics, new techniques and strategies, and the latest hardware and software applications.

    Formerly
    CIT 704

    Notes
    Maximum of three credits accepted toward a degree.

    Prerequisites
    Course work or experience in computing.

  
  •  

    CIT 607 - Technology as Educational Mindtools


    Credits 3

    Examines current technologies as examples of mindtools, research-based devices used to help students think and learn. Explores mindtools as a cognitive model and uses technology as a mindtool while providing students with the requisite skills to implement these tools in a classroom setting.

    Formerly
    CIT 707

  
  •  

    CIT 608 - Integrating Technology in Teaching and Learning


    Credits 3

    Study of research-based practices and methods of integrating technology to promote thinking and learning. Students actively explore contemporary technologies and environments for the production and consumption of information.

    Formerly
    CIT 720 and CIT 620.

    Prerequisites
    Coursework in educational technology or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 609 - Internet for Learning


    Credits 3

    Examines the potential of the Internet to impact education and learning. Explores a wide range of online resources and how they can be integrated into instruction.

    Formerly
    CIT 709

  
  •  

    CIT 611 - Digital Publishing for Educators


    Credits 3

    Hands-on tutorials and design assignments for using page layout and graphics software to create well designed, effective publications for professional and instructional purposes. Topics include: design principles, layout techniques, graphics and type manipulation, importing media, and desktop publishing projects for the classroom.

    Formerly
    CIT 711

    Prerequisites
    Coursework in educational technology or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 622 - Microcomputer Technology for Educators


    Credits 3

    In-depth look at how personal computers work. Microprocessors, printed circuit boards, bus structures, storage devices, and display options examined from the perspective of how they impact educational applications, purchasing decisions, and planning.

    Formerly
    CIT 722

    Prerequisites
    Coursework in educational technology or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 643 - Designing Digital Materials for Education


    Credits 3

    Examines instructional design principles and applies them to the design of instructional software. Explores various theories of learning as they apply to courseware.

    Formerly
    CIT 743

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 647 - Creating Online Learning Environments


    Credits 3

    Educational Web site development using contemporary tools and contexts. Emphasis on web-based programming and user interface design.

    Formerly
    CIT 747

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 648 - Issues and Methods in Online Learning


    Credits 3

    Addresses the theory and practice for online teaching and learning. Participants explore a range of resources and extend skills in creating and implementing digital learning activities. Emphasis is on pedagogical issues and trends in virtual schooling and distance education.

    Formerly
    CIT 768, CIT 668

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 649 - Instructional Methods Computer Applications


    Credits 3

    Study of research-based practices and methods for teaching computer applications. Emphasis on developing project-based instructional activities for teaching digital technologies in the elementary/secondary classroom or professional development settings.

    Formerly
    CIT 749

    Prerequisites
    Coursework in educational technology or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 651 - Instructional Methods Computer Science


    Credits 3

    Study of research-based practices and methods in the teaching of computer science topics including algorithmic processes and their principles, object orientation and programming, elements of software design and usability, data abstraction and logic structures, and interface design. Emphasis is on project-based learning (PBL) strategies in a web-based development environment.

     

    Formerly
    CIT 751

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 653 - Creating Digital Materials for Education


    Credits 3

    Focus on current application programming interfaces for developing digital educational materials.

    Formerly
    CIT 753

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 667 - Technology and Educational Change


    Credits 3

    Examines issues and trends pertaining to the implementation of technology-based innovations. Includes a review of research on past and current change efforts. Topics covered include professional development, assessment, strategies for technology coordinators, grant writing, and long-range planning for effective change.

    Formerly
    CIT 767

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 669 - Advanced Web Design and Development for Educators


    Credits 3

    Advanced educational web site development with emphasis on web-based programming and user interface design. Development environments such as JavaScript, Perl/ CGI, and brief introduction to Java explored.

    Formerly
    CIT 769

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 673 - Digital Materials Studio


    Credits 3

    Project-based course emphasizing problem definition, instructional design, and product development. Students work individually and collaboratively on a set of relevant technical and pedagogical competencies.

    Formerly
    CIT 763

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 676 - Management of Educational Technology Facilities and Resources


    Credits 3

    Advanced course focusing on problems and issues in procurement and management of educational computing applications, desktop workstations, computer laboratories, local and wide area networks, and support services. Consideration given to hardware and software interoperability; security for hardware, software and information; legal issues; health and safety factors; budgeting.

    Formerly
    CIT 766

    Prerequisites
      

  
  •  

    CIT 700 - Advanced Topics in Educational Technology


    Credits 1 – 6

    Specialized course that explores current educational technology topics and issues.

  
  •  

    CIT 770 - Advanced Seminar in Educational Technology Research


    Credits 3

    Emphasis is on critical review and analysis of educational technology research from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives.

    Prerequisites
    Doctoral status or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 772 - Technology in Teacher Education


    Credits 3

    Examines issues and research on preparing teachers to enhance learning with technology. Topics include ISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Students and Teachers, technology integration in methods courses and field experiences, electronic portfolio assessment, one-to-one laptop projects, and online learning in teacher preparation and professional development.

    Prerequisites
    Doctoral status or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 778 - Instructional Design


    Credits 3

    Trends, issues, and research findings on effective instructional planning, presentation, and evaluation.

    Prerequisites
    Doctoral status or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 780 - Multimedia Learning Studio


    Credits 3

    Examines the latest research regarding multimedia learning. Research supported principles will be applied in the development of multimedia instructional materials. This course can be taken up to 3 times for a total of 9 credit hours.

    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CIT 782 - Distance Education Issues and Trends


    Credits 3

    Study of issues, and trends in Distance Education. Examines distance education history, research, practice, and program/course development.

    Prerequisites
    Doctoral status or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CLS 612 - Clinical Immunology


    Credits 3

    Principles of immunology and the immune response as applied to states of health and disease, immune function and pathology. Topics include antibodies and other antigen receptors, antigens, cell-cell communications, major histocompatibility complex interactions, effector mechanisms, immune regulation, hypersensitivity reactions, immunoproliferative and immuno deficiency disease, transplantation immunology, and cancer mechanisms.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 412. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 613 - Clinical Immunology Laboratory


    Credits 1

    Immunologic and molecular techniques used to analyze antigen-antibody reactions in the diagnosis of health or disease. Including liquid and gel precipitation; direct agglutination, and hemagglutination; secondary indicator systems (RIA, ELISA, FA); bacterial and viral serology, Western Blot, DNA, fingerpainting, PCR, nucleic acid probes, flow cytometry and cellular analyses.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 413. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 614 - Transfusion - Immunohematology


    Credits 2

    Transfusion medicine stresses practical and theoretical aspects of the immunology of tissue antigens and blood group systems. Including ABO discrepancies, transfusion and compatibility testing, adverse reactions to transfusion, hemolytic disease of the newborn, hemotherapy, apheresis, immunomodulation, stem cell transplantation, donor selection and preparation.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 414. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 615 - Transfusion Medicine Immunohematology Laboratory


    Credits 3

    Simulated clinical immunohematology laboratory designed to expose the student to the clinical practice of a modern blood bank service. Applied experiences in basic and advanced clinical testing related to common blood group antigens and their associated antibodies, compatibility testing, alloantibody identification, adsorptions/elutions, transfusion reactions and pre/postnatal studies.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 615. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 622 - Clinical Hematology I


    Credits 3

    Basic and diagnostic hematology with an emphasis on pathophysiology. Hematopoiesis, anemias, and hemostasis presented through lectures, case studies and morphologic review of peripheral blood and bone marrow smears. Differential diagnosis of these disorders through specified diagnostic laboratory tests.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 442. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 623 - Clinical Hematology Laboratory I


    Credits 2

    Basic and diagnostic hematology with an emphasis on the laboratory tests used to differentially diagnose various hematologic disorders. Major emphasis on the various anemias and primary hemostatic bleeding disorders. Laboratory unknowns and peripheral/bone marrow microscopic slides used to correlate clinical tests and theoretical principles.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 423. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 624 - Clinical Hematology II


    Credits 3

    Diagnostic hematology and body fluid analysis with emphasis on pathphysiology. Myeloproliferative, lymphoproliferative, myelodysplastic, acute and chronic leukemias and advanced topics in hemostasis presented through lectures, case studies and morphologic review of peripheral blood and bone marrow slides. Differential diagnosis of these disorders through specified laboratory tests.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 424. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 625 - Clinical Hematology Laboratory II


    Credits 2

    Diagnostic hematology and body fluid analysis with an emphasis on the laboratory tests, cytochemical stains, and molecular markers used to differently diagnose the various hematologic malignancies and hemostasis disorders. Laboratory unknowns and peripheral/bone marrow microscopic slides used to correlate clinical tests and theoretic principles.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 425. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 632 - Clinical Microbiology I


    Credits 3

    Introduction to medically significant microbial diseases of man. Microbial physiology and pathogenic interactions between man and microorganism. Epidemiology, triage, and diagnosis of microorganisms causing human diseases. Emphasis is on aerobic and anaerobic bacterial diseases, mycobacteria, vibrios, Legionella, Mycoplasma, spirochetes, Rickettsia and Chlamydia. Includes discussion of antimicrobial therapy and resistance mechanisms.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 432. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 633 - Clinical Microbiology Laboratory I


    Credits 2

    Introduction to isolation, diagnostic and identification techniques for microbial diseases of humans. Emphasis is on aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, mycobacteria, vibrios, Legionella, Mycoplasma, spriochetes, Rickettsia and Chlamydia. Includes conventional microscopic, culture, molecular and immunological techniques as well as susceptibility testing methods.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 433. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 634 - Clinical Microbiology II


    Credits 3

    Advanced medical microbiology. Microbial physiology and pathogenic interactions between man and microorganism. Epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of microrganisms causing human diseases. Emphasis is on fungal, parasitic and viral diseases as well as miscellaneous bacteria from various body sites. Includes discussion of antimicrobial therapy and resistance mechanisms.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 434. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 635 - Clinical Microbiology Laboratory II


    Credits 2

    Advanced practical applications in the recovery, isolation and identification of microorganisms causing human disease. Emphasis is on methods for mycology, parasitology, and virology as well as miscellaneous bacteria from different body sites. Includes conventional microscopic, culture, molecular and immunological techniques as well as susceptibility testing methods.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 435. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 642 - Clinical Chemistry I


    Credits 3

    Chemical analysis indicative of human health and disease. Theory and utilization of biochemical instrumentation including photometry, electrochemical, and electrophoresis. Emphasis placed on method application to analysis of carbohydrates, proteins, electrolytes, liver and pancreatic function.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 442. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 643 - Clinical Chemistry I Laboratory


    Credits 1

    Manual and automated chemical methods used to measure normal and abnormal constituents, such as glucose, electrolytes, and proteins, in blood and body fluids. Use of spectrophotometric techniques, recognition of technical problems and selected abnormalities discussed.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 443. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 644 - Clinical Chemistry II


    Credits 3

    Advanced study of chemical analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids in normal and abnormal physiological conditions. Emphasizes interdependency, physiological conditions affecting test results and clinical significance. Topics include endocrinology, toxicology, and radioimmunoassay.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 444. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 645 - Clinical Chemistry II Laboratory


    Credits 1

    Advanced laboratory applications in chemical analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids in normal and abnormal physiological conditions. Emphasizes interdependency, physiological conditions affecting test results and clinical significance. Topics include endocrinology, toxicology and radioimmunoassay.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 445. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 653 - Seminar in CLS IV


    Credits 2

    Discussion of topics in current clinical laboratory pathology. Individual and group projects used to reinforce concepts for interpretation and correlation of laboratory data to patient care. Includes

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 453. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 681 - Clinical Practicum in Hematology


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of hematology and body fluids. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level cometencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 481. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 682 - Clinical Practicum in Chemistry


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the areas of chemistry, immunology, and urinalysis. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 482. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 683 - Clinical Practicum in Immunohematology


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of immunohematology. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 683. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 684 - Clinical Practicum in Microbiology


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experiences and technical competencies in the area of clinical microbiology, parasitology, and mycology. Clinical practicum in affiliated laboratories designed to develop entry-level competencies and to assist the student in making the transition to clinical practitioner. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 484. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CLS 685 - Advanced Clinical Practicum


    Credits 3

    Clinical practice module that allows the student to gain applied experience in the area of toxicology, flow cytometry, and molecular diagnostics. Clinical practicum in specified affiliated laboratories designed to provide exposure to the student in the specialty areas listed. Supervision by clinical/university faculty.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CLS 485. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 601 - The Rhetoric of Women’s Rights, 1832-1920


    Credits 3

    Examination of the rhetorical campaign for woman suffrage and women’s rights from the early nineteenth century up to passage of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. Emphasis on identifying, understanding, and evaluating major rhetorical strategies in their historical context.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    COM 603 - Public Communication


    Credits 3

    Examination of public communication in terms of form, context, people, messages, and delivery. Particular focus on the ethics of public communication.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 403. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 604 - Principles of Persuasion


    Credits 3

    Examination of the principles involved in influencing groups and individuals.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 404. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 607 - Communication Between the Sexes


    Credits 3

    Introduction to gender research in communication, studying ways in which language, interpersonal communication, the media, and various social institutions influence conceptions of gender.

    Same as
    WMST 407.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 407. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 610 - Advanced Topics in Relational Communication


    Credits 3

    This course will examine contemporary topics and processes relevant to communication in personal relationships. To improve understanding of the communication process and its implications for the development, maintenance, and termination of close personal relationships, current theory and research will be incorporated. The course will enhance critical thinking and analytical skills.

  
  •  

    COM 613 - Argumentation


    Credits 3

    Study of advanced argumentation theories and implementation of argumentation practice.

  
  •  

    COM 614 - Famous Speeches


    Credits 3

    Study of the role of public address in American history. Emphasis on speeches which had a significant effect on American history.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 414. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate Standing.

  
  •  

    COM 615 - Marital & Family Communication


    Credits 3

    This course introduces graduate students to communication processes that occur in the context of marital and family relationships. We will examine definitions of the family, the roles of family members, various types of families that comprise modern society, and a number of current issues that affect families. Students will also become more familiar with communication theory and research both at the disciplinary level but also in the particular area of family communication.
     

  
  •  

    COM 634 - Conflict Management


    Credits 3

    Examination of various types and sources of conflict in interpersonal relationships, the management and resolution of these conflicts through various decision-making models. Practical application of theory emphasized in various classroom exercises.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 434. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 641 - Rhetoric of Dissent


    Credits 3

    Description and analysis of public discourse by agitators and those opposed to agitation. Focus on significant movements for change in recent American history.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 441. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 682 - Security Discourse


    Credits 3

    In a globalized world the ways in which national security is discussed profoundly affects the public life of all individuals. This class examines the language, arguments and practices related to security policy, including but not limited to topics such as the rhetorics of American foreign policy, war, terrorism and nuclear arms.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 482. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 684 - Political Communication


    Credits 3

    Analysis of historical and contemporary political discourse. Addresses such topics as presidential rhetoric, electoral campaigns, ethics in political culture, institutional leadership, publics and public opinion, meditated political speech, legislative debates, political socialization.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with COM 484. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    COM 706 - Seminar in Intercultural Communication


    Credits 3

    Study of theoretical, methodological, practical and service foundations of intercultural communication. Examines complexities and implications of the relationship of culture and communication.

  
  •  

    COM 710 - Survey of Communication Studies


    Credits 3

    Survey of communication disciplines and their interrelationships; past, contemporary, and emerging issues; appropriate research topics, questions, methods, and style.

  
  •  

    COM 711 - Rhetorical-Critical Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Methods of describing, analyzing, interpreting, and judging public discourse. Study critical theory and practice. Research and write original critical essays.

  
  •  

    COM 712 - Empirical Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Fundamentals of scientific philosophy, research design, and data analysis; writing and critiquing research reports.

  
  •  

    COM 725 - College Teaching in Communication


    Credits 3

    Discussion of theory and practice in the teaching of communication in college, particularly entry-level courses.

    Notes
    Required of all graduate teaching assistants.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    COM 730 - Theories of Communication


    Credits 3

    Exploration and explanation of communication phenomena. Survey of theoretical ideas, nature of theory in general, major communication theories and theories relevant to communication, and examines purpose of theory in communication research.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing.

  
  •  

    COM 741 - Social Movements as Rhetorical Form


    Credits 3

    Rhetorical approaches to the study of social movements, examining communicative processes and symbolic action involved in social change. Focuses on theoretical and methodological issues in movement studies as well as on rhetorical documents and practices of several social movements.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    COM 780 - Persuasion


    Credits 3

    Study of theories and applications of persuasion in various fields of social, political, business, religious, and educational activities.

  
  •  

    COM 781 - Seminar in Argumentation


    Credits 3

    Examines field of argument from its roots in classical Aristotelian rationalism to modern practical reasoning perspectives. Argumentation in interpersonal and public contexts emphasized.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    COM 784 - Political Communication


    Credits 3

    Study of relationship of rhetorical communication theory to political discourse. Focus on political campaigns, presidential rhetoric, and media influences.

  
  •  

    COM 789 - Selected Topics in Communication


    Credits 3

    Content varies with current developments in communication theory.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits with instructor’s permission.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    COM 793 - Independent Study


    Credits 1 – 3

    Supervised study and practical experience in subjects and projects determined in consultation with a faculty member. Students wishing to take this course must consult with the faculty member prior to registration.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of three credits.

  
  •  

    COM 794 - Special Readings


    Credits 3

    Content dependent upon the instructor’s interest and expertise, as well as student interest and requirements.

  
  •  

    COM 797 - Thesis


    Credits 3

    This course is approved for use in graduate programs for Master of Arts candidates.

    Notes
    May be repeated but only six credits applied to the student’s program.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

  
  •  

    COU 610 - Eating Disorders: Etiology and Treatment


    Credits 3

    Designed as a comprehensive review of eating disorders, correlated issues, and treatment interventions. Cultural, familial, societal, and personal factors that may contribute to the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Variety of prevention and intervention strategies explored.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CED 410. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 605 - History of Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Historical development of criminal justice. Several eras reviewed, including the colonial period (up to 1815), nineteenth century, early twentieth century (up to 1940), and the modern era (1940-present).

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 405. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 611 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems


    Credits 3

    Analysis of the development, function, and problems of foreign criminal justice systems. Emphasis on comparisons to the American system.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 411. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 628 - Women and Crime


    Credits 3

    Women as offenders and as processed through the criminal justice system; women as victims and the response of the criminal justice system and the community.

    Same as
    WMST 428

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 428. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 636 - Sociology of Law


    Credits 3

    Study of the social nature of law, the relationship of law to social organization, law as a mechanism of social change, and the interrelationship between social factors and legal processes.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 436. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 641 - Social Science in Law


    Credits 3

    Use of social science as a tool for a legal analysis. Examines the utility of empirical research in determining substantive legal issues such as community defenses, the use of offender profiles in criminal procedure, the death penalty and the size of juries.

    Notes
    This course is crosslisted with CRJ 441. Credit at the 600-level requires additional work.

  
  •  

    CRJ 700 - Proseminar in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Provides an introduction to graduate studies in Criminal Justice. Students are exposed to information regarding the main components of the criminal justices system, including: law enforcement, courts, and the correctional system.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice.

  
  •  

    CRJ 701 - Proseminar on Theory


    Credits 3

    History of criminological thought. Contemporary and classical theories of crime. Attention to social, cultural, and psychological perspectives.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 702 - Proseminar on Research Methods


    Credits 3

    Methods and applications of quantitative and qualitative research. Relationships among theory, research, and social policy. Development and interpretation of research reports.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor and satisfactory completion of an undergraduate course in research methods.

  
  •  

    CRJ 703 - Proseminar on Statistics


    Credits 3

    Univariate and multivariate techniques. Use of computerized statistical packages in the social and behavioral sciences. Practical applications in statistical problem-solving using primary and secondary data sources.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor and satisfactory completion of an undergraduate statistics course.

  
  •  

    CRJ 704 - Proseminar on Law and Social Control


    Credits 3

    Nature of law and legal institutions. Relationships between law and other forms of social control. Theory and research on the development and implementation of law.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 705 - Proseminar on the Administration of Justice


    Credits 3

    Structures, functions, and operations of criminal justice organizations. Formal and informal organizational structures and their relationships to the broader social, political, and legal institutions.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 706 - Seminar on the Nature of Crime


    Credits 3

    Investigation of selected theoretical perspectives and particular types of crime and criminality.

    Notes
    Specific subject matter varies by semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 707 - Policing


    Credits 3

    Police organization and subculture, occupational socialization, police community relations, occupational deviance, policy formation, and related issues discussed.

    Notes
    Specific subject matter varies by semester.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 708 - Seminar on Law and Legal Process


    Credits 3

    Development and implementation of criminal law. May focus on issues related to the legislative process, the criminal courts, case law, and legal reform.

    Notes
    Specific subject matter varies by semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 709 - Delinquency and Juvenile Justice


    Credits 3

    Historical development and current practices of juvenile courts and treatment institutions. Emphasis on the relationship between delinquency theory, research, and policy formulation, with particular attention to programs of delinquency prevention.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
  •  

    CRJ 710 - Crime and Its Control in Gambling


    Credits 3

    Analytical approach to patterns of gambling in America,nature of organized crime involvement, and development and implementation of forms of social control of organized crime in the area. Particular attention given to patterns of crime and regulatory control in Nevada gambling.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 711 - Criminological Research


    Credits 3

    Correlates of crime and theory-based research on crime causation. Implications for the major theoretical perspectives.

    Prerequisites
      and  , graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 712 - Punishment and Corrections


    Credits 3

    Philosophies and practices of punishment and corrections. Contemporary theory, the prison environment, work and rehabilitation programs, parole, overcrowding, capital punishment, and alternatives to imprisonment.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 713 - Victimization


    Credits 3

    Problems confronted by victims of crime. The role of the victim in criminal offenses. Policy, advocacy issues, and victims’ rights.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 714 - Theory Construction


    Credits 3

    Types of theory and levels of theoretical analysis. Empirical, logical, and conceptual considerations in the construction of theory. Problems and prospects for theoretical integration and the development of general theory.

    Prerequisites
      and  , Graduate standing in criminal justice, consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 715 - Criminal Justice Policy


    Credits 3

    Contemporary policies in criminal justice. Relationships among theory, policy, and practice. Attention to public opinion, legislative process, law enforcement administration, the courts, appellate review, issues of intergroup conflict, and civil rights.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 716 - Graduate Readings in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    With faculty supervision, students pursue a personalized program of readings related to specific issues in criminal justice.

    Prerequisites
      and   and Graduate standing in criminal justice or consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 724 - Applied Research in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Survey of research and statistical methods appropriate for evaluating criminal justice programs. Nature and role of program evaluation; impact and process assessment; presentation and interpretation of statistical results, ethics and politics of evaluation research.

    Prerequisites
        

  
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    CRJ 796 - Comprehensive Examination


    Credits 3

    As part of the requirements for the Professional Degree Program, students must pass a written comprehensive examination designed to test students’ ability to synthesize a body of knowledge in criminal justice.

    Prerequisites
         

  
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    CRJ 797 - Master’s Thesis in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3 or 6

    Development of a research design and analysis of data relating to an issue of theoretical and empirical significance. Students expected to display the ability to integrate the elements of the core courses and related program of study.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Grading
    S/F grading only.

    Prerequisites
        , and   and Graduate standing in criminal justice, consent of instructor.

  
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    CRJ 798 - Applied Project in Criminal Justice


    Credits 3

    Research application in criminal justice or an evaluation of a specific criminal justice program.

    Notes
    May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

    Prerequisites
         , and  

 

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