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    University of Nevada, Las Vegas
   
 
  Aug 17, 2017
 
 
    
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2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: CONTENT MAY NOT BE CURRENT. USE THE DROP DOWN ABOVE TO ACCESS THE CURRENT CATALOG.

General Education


 

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Nevada System of Higher Education Requirements

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The courses and number of semester credit-hours shown in this section are the minimum requirements for all students completing an associate or baccalaureate degree at any Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) institution. The number of courses and credits completed to satisfy the NSHE General Education requirements at the individual NSHE institutions must meet or exceed these requirements. Students completing the University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Core and Distribution requirements will automatically satisfy the Nevada System of Higher Education General Education requirements.

The UNLV General Education curriculum and specific UNLV courses satisfying or exceeding each NSHE course requirement are described in the following catalog subsections General Education Core Requirements and General Education Distribution Requirements that are part of the catalog section titled University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Requirements below.  Students, advisors and faculty should use the University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Requirements to plan, fulfill and audit students’ degree programs.

Students earning a second associate of arts, associate of science, associate of business, or baccalaureate degree, whose first degree is from an NSHE institution, are not required to repeat the System requirements for general education.

As explained in the Constitutions section, evidence of completion of U.S. and Nevada Constitutions is required of all second baccalaureate degree students whose first degree is not from an NSHE institution.

The Nevada System of Higher Education requirements are:

  1. English Requirement. 3-6 credits. To satisfy the Nevada System of Higher Education’s Freshman English Composition requirement, all students must complete Freshman level English Composition including English 102. Normally, this consists of English (ENG) 101 and 102. Please see the University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Core Requirements for English Composition placement information.
  2. Constitutions Requirement. For all associate and baccalaureate degrees, instruction must be given in the essentials of the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Nevada, including the origin and history of the Constitutions and the study of and devotion to American institutions and ideals pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes 396.500 for all associate and baccalaureate degrees. If clearly identified, this content may be included in other coursework. The UNLV catalog must identify courses that meet this requirement. Evidence of completion of U.S. and Nevada Constitutions is required of all second baccalaureate degree students whose first degree is not from an NSHE institution. Please see Constitutions Requirement in the following University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Core Requirements section for complete descriptions.
  3. Mathematics Requirement. 3 credits. Three credits of a lower-division (100 or 200 level) mathematics course. Please see the General Education Core requirements section for a complete description of how this requirement is met at UNLV.
  4. Natural Science Requirement. 6 credits. Six credits of lower-division (100 or 200 level) coursework to include at least one laboratory experience. Please see the Life and Physical Sciences and Analytical Thinking Distribution requirement in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Requirements section for a complete description of how this requirement is met at UNLV.
  5. Social Science or Humanities/Fine Arts Requirement. 9 credits. Nine credits of lower-lower-division (100 or 200 level) coursework in either the social sciences or humanities/fine arts. Please see the Social Sciences and Humanities and Fine Arts Distribution Requirements in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Requirements section for complete descriptions of how these requirements are met at UNLV.

University of Nevada, Las Vegas General Education Requirements

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The purpose of the UNLV General Education Program is to foster student attainment of knowledge and skills that will enable them to perform better in their academic majors and in their post-graduate careers. Expected student knowledge and skills are expressed in the University Undergraduate Learning Outcomes (UULOs) that describe how students should become effective inquirers, critical thinkers, and effective oral and written communicators; participate knowledgeably and ethically in civic life; develop knowledge of the world’s diverse societies; understand and integrate basic principles of natural and social sciences, humanities and fine arts into their learning; and continue their learning throughout their lives.

University Undergraduate Learning Outcomes

The UULOs articulate clear expectations for what all UNLV students should know and be able to do upon graduation. The UULOs form the foundation for general education and extend into the majors. This comprehensive approach aims to meld undergraduate learning into a more intentional, coherent experience that consists of the purposeful sequencing of learning from the first year, to the middle years, to the senior year, and includes learning within and outside the major that consists of both curricular and co-curricular experiences.

1. Intellectual Breadth and Lifelong Learning – Graduates are able to understand and integrate basic principles of the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, fine arts, and health sciences, and develop skills and a desire for lifelong learning. Specific outcomes for all students include:

    a. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge and skills in at least one major area.
    b. Identify the fundamental principles of the natural and health sciences, social
        sciences, humanities, and fine arts.
    c. Apply the research methods and theoretical models of the natural and health 
        sciences, social sciences, humanities, and fine arts to define, solve, and evaluate
        problems.
    d. Transfer knowledge and skills gained from general and specialized studies to
        new settings and complex problems.
    e. Demonstrate life-long learning skills, including the ability to place problems in
        personally meaningful contexts; reflect on one’s own understanding;
        demonstrate awareness of what needs to be learned, articulate a learning plan;
        and act independently on the plan, using appropriate resources.
     f. Achieve success in one’s chosen field or discipline, including applying persistence,
        motivation, interpersonal communications, leadership, goal setting,
        and career skills.

2. Inquiry and Critical Thinking – Graduates are able to identify problems, articulate questions, and use various forms of research and reasoning to guide the collection, analysis, and use of information related to those problems. Specific outcomes for all students include:

    a. Identify problems, articulate questions or hypotheses, and determine the need
        for information.
    b. Access and collect the needed information from appropriate primary and
        secondary sources.
    c. Use quantitative and qualitative methods, including the ability to recognize
       assumptions, draw inferences, make deductions, and interpret information 
       to analyze problems in context, and then draw conclusions.
    d. Recognize the complexity of problems and identify different perspectives from
        which problems and questions can be viewed.
    e. Evaluate and report on conclusions, including discussing the basis for and 
        strength of findings, and identify areas where further inquiry is needed.
    f. Identify, analyze, and evaluate reasoning, and construct and defend reasonable
       arguments and explanations.

3. Communication – Graduates are able to write and speak effectively to both general and specialized audiences, create effective visuals that support written or spoken communication, and use electronic media common to one’s field or profession. Specific outcomes for all students include:

    a. Demonstrate general academic literacy, including how to respond to the needs of
        audiences and to different kinds of rhetorical situations, analyze and
        evaluate reasons and evidence, and construct research-based arguments
        using Standard Written English.
    b. Effectively use the common genres and conventions for writing within a 
        particular discipline or profession.
    c. Prepare and deliver effective oral presentations.
    d. Collaborate effectively with others to share information, solve problems,
        or complete tasks.
    e. Produce effective visuals using different media.
    f. Apply the up-to-date technologies commonly used to research and
       communicate within one’s field.

4. Global/Multicultural Knowledge and Awareness– Graduates will have developed knowledge of global and multicultural societies, and an awareness of their place in and effect on them. Specific outcomes for all students include:

    a. Demonstrate knowledge of the history, philosophy, arts and geography of
        world cultures.
    b. Respond to diverse perspectives linked to identity, including age, ability,
        religion, politics, race, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality; both in American 
        and international contexts.
    c. Apply the concept of social justice.
    d. Demonstrate familiarity with a non-native language, or experience living
        in a different culture.
    e. Function effectively in diverse groups.
    f. Demonstrate awareness of one’s own place in and effect on the world.

5. Citizenship and Ethics – Graduates are able to participate knowledgeably and actively in the public life of our communities and make informed, responsible, and ethical decisions in their personal and professional lives. Specific outcomes for all students include:

    a. Acquire knowledge of political, economic, and social institutions.
    b. Identify the various rights and obligations that citizens have in their
        communities.
    c. Apply various forms of citizenship skills such as media analysis, letter writing, 
       community service and lobbying.
    d. Explain the concept of sustainability as it impacts economic, environmental,
        and social concerns.
    e. Examine various concepts and theories of ethics, and how to deliberate and 
        assess claims about ethical issues.
    f. Apply ethical concepts and theories to specific ethical dilemmas students will
       experience in their personal and professional lives.

General Education Curriculum

All UNLV students are expected to be engaged in the learning process and progressively improve their knowledge and capabilities in the UULOs for both their general education and academic major. Attainment of the learning outcomes will occur as students complete both formal classwork and engage in co-curricular efforts such as undergraduate research, scholarly and creative activities, service learning, and community engagement. These activities provide students opportunities to work with faculty at the forefront of their disciplines and to contribute to a creative and constructive university environment. Additional opportunities are made available to UNLV students to build partnerships with the community through service learning opportunities as well as leadership programs.

To guide student attainment of learning outcomes at every stage of the process, UNLV’s General Education curriculum consists of a lower division Core requirement, a Distribution requirement, and Milestone and Culminating Experiences in the students’ academic majors.

The Core includes English Composition, a required First-Year Seminar (FYS), a required Second-Year Seminar (SYS), a course of study in the Constitutions of the United States and of Nevada, and Mathematics. English Composition develops students’ abilities to read and analyze difficult texts, respond in well-written essays, and apply the principles of good research in their writing. The First-Year Seminar introduces students to the university environment, its shared values (the UULOs), the academic expectations of research-oriented institutions, and college success strategies. The Second-Year Seminar provides students with a more in-depth understanding of the Learning Outcomes through intensive engagement in reading, writing, and critical thinking.

Students will then demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skills, and critical thinking within the context of the major field of study through a Milestone Experience in their sophomore or junior year and a Culminating Experience in their senior year, both of which are major program-specific in their design and delivery.

Courses that satisfy UNLV’s General Education Requirements simultaneously satisfy the Nevada System of Higher Education General Education requirements. The UNLV General Education requirements must be completed by all baccalaureate degree candidates. With the exception of UNLV general education courses satisfying Multicultural/International course requirements, courses cannot simultaneously satisfy two or more general education curriculum requirements.

Transfer Students and Students with Prior Undergraduate Degrees

Admitted transfer students should confer with the Registrar’s Office or their college advising center about applicable General Education transfer credit and course substitutions where appropriate.

Students who received an Associate of Arts, Associate of Business, or Associate of Science degree from any Nevada System of Higher Education community college are exempt from all UNLV general education requirements. They must still complete the UNLV Milestone or Culminating Experience requirements in their baccalaureate majors.

Students previously awarded a bachelor’s degree from any Nevada System of Higher Education institution are exempt from all UNLV General Education requirements, except for major course requirements for their 2nd major that are also designated as part of Milestone and Culminating Experiences.

Students awarded a bachelor’s degree from any regionally accredited institution outside of Nevada, provided their previously completed general education curriculum consisted of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of for-credit, non-developmental courses, are exempt from nearly all UNLV General Education requirements, except for U.S and Nevada Constitutions (if not previously completed) and major course requirements for their 2nd major that are also designated as part of Milestone and Culminating Experiences.

Transfer students and students with prior degrees who have already successfully completed a satisfactory three semester credit U.S. Constitutions course from a regionally accredited institution must successfully complete a satisfactory Nevada Constitutions course. For Constitutions courses offered prior to 2000, please refer to the appropriate catalog course descriptions to determine which ones satisfied the Constitutions requirement.

Lower-division general education courses successfully completed at a regionally accredited U.S. institution that may possibly count towards UNLV general education requirements will be evaluated for transfer credit no matter in what year the courses were completed.

Upper-division courses and/or courses designed for the major may not be applicable for transfer if they are over 10 years old, depending on the field of study as determined by the UNLV College, School or Department offering coursework in that field.

If a student transfers from a regionally accredited U.S. institution where the incoming transfer credits do not match the UNLV semester credits required, UNLV will first identify (if it exists) the matching general education requirement and/or the equivalent UNLV course, and then compare the number of transfer credits earned to the number of credits required. Then, whether the course is equivalent to a UNLV course or simply meets a general education requirement, the following determinations will be made:

  • If 66% or more of required credits for a particular UNLV requirement have been earned in the transfer course, then the requirement has been met.
  • If less than 66% of required credits have been earned in the transfer course, then the student must successfully complete additional course(s) to make up the credit shortage within that general education requirement. Students must still satisfy the minimum general education credits in every category to graduate.

Transfer students from NSHE institutions who have previously been awarded Associate of Arts, Associate of Business, of Associate of Science degrees are exempt from the FYS and SYS, but are not exempt from the Milestone and Culminating Experience requirements in their majors, unless they have satisfactorily completed a class at another NSHE institution that has a common course number with a Milestone class designated as part of a Milestone Experience in their UNLV major.

Second baccalaureate students who have been awarded a recognized bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution (including UNLV degrees) are exempt from the FYS and SYS, but are not exempt from the Milestone and Culminating Experience requirements in their second majors.

For transfer students without a previously awarded degree:

i) an exemption for FYS is usually granted for satisfactory completion (passing grades) of 30 or more semester credit-hours;
ii) exemptions for both FYS and SYS are usually granted for satisfactory completion (passing grades) of 60 or more semester credit-hours.

Honors College
Students who successfully complete the Core Curriculum of the Honors College automatically satisfy all of the General Education Core requirements.

Petitions for Substitutions or Waivers
Students seeking to apply for substitution or waiver of General Education Requirements should submit a petition approved by the Advisor, Department Chair and College Dean to the Faculty Senate General Education Committee at least two semesters before the proposed date of graduation.

General Education Core Requirements - 18-21 credits

  1. First-Year Seminar…………………….2-3 credits
    A required first-year course, the First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to the University Undergraduate Learning Outcomes (UULOs) through reading, writing, and critical thinking. This course will provide a foundation for students’ general education experience and introduce integration of the UULOs into any major field of study. It will introduce through the Undergraduate Learning Outcomes: inquiry and critical thinking, written and oral communication, citizenship and ethics, global and multicultural issues, and intellectual breadth and lifelong learning.
    All students are required to satisfactorily complete a designated FYS before completing 30 credits. To meet this requirement, students can take and complete any approved FYS that is offered by any college or department. The University FYS requirement is for a minimum of 2 credits. A college or department may elect to require an additional 1 credit of material specific to a particular major. Students changing majors need not repeat the 2-credit University FYS requirement, but may be required to complete the additional 1 credit college or department requirement for their major. Approved FYS courses currently include:  ,  ,    ,  ,  ,  ,  ,  , and  . Check the  General Education web page and the UNLV Class Schedule for an up-to-date list of approved FYS courses.
  2. English Composition…………………..6 credits
    English 101 and 102. These courses should be successfully completed during the student’s first year at UNLV, and must be completed prior to the end of the second year. Please see the catalog Admissions Section, the UNLV English Composition Program website or the UNLV Class Schedule web-site for current ACT/SAT placement test scores that will guide placement in the appropriate English Composition class. Students with ACT English scores of 30 or higher, or SAT Writing or Critical Reading scores of 680 or higher place out of   and need only take and successfully complete  . Minimum CLEP scores and Advanced Placement scores that satisfy the   requirement are listed in the Admissions section of the catalog under the heading Nontraditional Credit. Students interested in alternate placement testing should contact the English Composition Program. Students whose first language is not English may take and successfully complete   as an alternative to   and   as an alternative to  . All students must take and successfully complete   or  ; there is no exemption at UNLV.
  3. Second-Year Seminar………………..3 credits
    A required second-year course, the Second-Year Seminar (SYS) engages students more intensively with the learning outcomes through extensive reading, writing, and critical thinking.  These seminars  explore issues relevant to contemporary global society within their larger contexts, including but not limited to aspects of literature, history, politics, economics, philosophy, and scientific discovery. They reinforce the UULOs of global awareness, ethics, civic engagement, oral and written communication and critical thinking introduced within the First-Year Seminar.
    All students must satisfactorily complete a designated SYS before completing 60 credits. Students from any college or major may take any approved SYS to meet the requirement. The following are prerequisites for the course: FYS and   and   (or equivalent). Approved SYS courses currently include:  ,   ,   ,   ,    , and   . Check the General Education web page and the UNLV class schedule for an up-to-date list of approved SYS courses.
  4. Constitutions……………………………..4-6 credits
    All students must satisfactorily complete courses examining the Constitutions of both the United States and the State of Nevada. Transfer students who have already successfully completed a satisfactory 3 semester-credit U.S. Constitutions course from a regionally-accredited institution must successfully complete a satisfactory Nevada Constitutions course. Current UNLV courses that satisfy the Constitutions requirements are:
  5. Mathematics Requirement…………..3 credits
    Any 100 or 200-level MATH course except   or  . Mathematics course requirements are college-specific; therefore, students should check with the Advising Center of their major to determine what Mathematics course is required. This course should be satisfactorily completed during the student’s first year at UNLV, and must be completed prior to the end of the second year. Please see the catalog Admissions Section for current ACT/SAT placement test scores that will guide placement in the appropriate MATH class. Students interested in alternate placement testing should contact the Department of Mathematical Sciences.

General Education Distribution Requirements - 18-19 credits

The purpose of the distribution requirement is to provide attainment of the Intellectual Breadth and Lifelong Learning outcome by developing in students the intellectual breadth needed by all citizens in a complex, multicultural and technological global civilization. To meet this requirement, students must satisfactorily complete three courses, typically totaling nine to ten credit hours, in each of two content areas that are OUTSIDE the major area of study. The three distribution content areas are: (1) Humanities and Fine Arts, (2) Social Sciences, and (3) Life and Physical Sciences and Analytical Thinking. Students automatically satisfy one distribution area when they complete their major course requirements. Please see the listing “Majors and their Distribution Area Assignments” later in this section to see the Major Distribution content areas that are satisfied within the major area of study. See the Faculty Senate General Education web page for a continuously updated listing of the courses satisfying the content areas designated below.
The major department or college will also decide what training in computer literacy is needed, or incorporate such training in other course work for the major.

The distribution content areas are:

  • Humanities and Fine Arts
    Two courses (three credits each) from two different humanities areas and one introductory or appreciation course (three credits) from a fine arts area. Courses used to satisfy the English Literature or Constitution requirements may not be used to satisfy Humanities distribution requirements.
     

 

  • Life and Physical Sciences and Analytical Thinking
    Two courses from the life and physical sciences (at least one of which must be a laboratory course), typically for a total of seven credits, and one three-credit course in analytical thinking.
    • Life and Physical Science courses (7 credits) will be selected from astronomy;  ,  ;  ; biology; chemistry (except  );   ,  ; physical geography; geology; or physics.
    • Analytical Thinking course (3 credits):  .
       
  • Social Sciences
    One course each from three different fields for a total of nine (9) credits. Courses used to satisfy the Constitutions requirement may not be used to meet Social Sciences distribution requirements.

Multicultural and International Requirements
A minimum of six (6) credits, to be composed of a three-credit multicultural course requirement and a three-credit international course requirement that may simultaneously fulfill other general education requirements. A single course may not simultaneously meet both the multicultural and international requirements. To identify approved courses satisfying these requirements, consult the University General Education website ((http://generaled.unlv.edu/mi.html)).

Milestone and Culminating Experiences

Milestone Experience: The milestone experience will orient students to the expected learning outcomes of the major and reinforce the UULOs. Each major program of study will identify and implement a Milestone Experience for their majors that can be in the form of a single course, components of multiple courses, or defined assessable outcomes. The Milestone Experience will be successfully completed in the sophomore or junior year, and will include, at a minimum, reinforcement of the (i) Inquiry and Critical Thinking and (ii) Communication UULOs.

Culminating Experience: The Culminating Experience is a final review, consolidation, and assessment of the UULOs as well as the learning outcomes of the respective major. Each major program of study will identify and implement a Culminating Experience for their majors. The Culminating Experience can be implemented in a variety of forms. For example, a Culminating Experience might consist of one or more of the following: an original undergraduate research project, a design capstone, developing an e-portfolio of artistic or scholarly work completed over a student’s college career, or a required internship or service learning project with an academic component that requires development and presentation of a report. The Culminating Experience should be completed in the last year prior to graduation.

Majors and Their Distribution Area Assignments
Students are required to fulfill General Education Distribution content requirements in the TWO areas OUTSIDE their major’s distribution area. The distribution areas that are automatically satisfied by completing the major are listed below:

College or Major  Distribution Area satisfied in the Major
   
Lee Business School  
All Majors  Social Sciences
   

College of Education

 
Early Childhood Education  Social Sciences
Elementary Education  Social Sciences
Physical Education  Social Sciences
Secondary Education  According to teaching field listed below
          Anthropology Social Sciences
          Art Humanities and Fine Arts
          Biological Science Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
          Chemistry Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
          Earth Science Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
          Eng Lit/American Lit Humanities and Fine Arts
          English (Comprehensive) Humanities and Fine Arts
          French Humanities and Fine Arts
          General Science Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
          German Humanities and Fine Arts
          History Humanities and Fine Arts
          Journalism Humanities and Fine Arts
          Mathematics Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
          Physical Science Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
          Physics Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
          Political Science Social Sciences
          Social Science (Comp) Social Sciences
          Spanish Humanities and Fine Arts
          Speech Communication Humanities and Fine Arts
          Theatre Arts/Drama Humanities and Fine Arts
          Special Education Social Sciences
          Workforce Education Social Sciences
   
Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering  
All Majors  Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
   
College of Fine Arts  
All Majors  Humanities and Fine Arts
   
Division of Health Sciences  
School of Allied Health Sciences (All majors) Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
School of Nursing (All majors) Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
School of Community Health Sciences (All majors) Social Science
   
Honors College  
  Please see Honors College program requirements
   
William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration  
All Majors Social Sciences
   

College of Liberal Arts

 
Afro-American Studies  Social Sciences
Anthropology  Social Sciences
English  Humanities and Fine Arts
Foreign Languages  Humanities and Fine Arts
History  Humanities and Fine Arts
Interdisciplinary Degrees  
          Asian Studies Social Sciences
          Latin American Studies

Social Sciences

          Linguistic Studies

Social Sciences

          Multidisciplinary Studies

Social Sciences

          Social Science Studies

Social Sciences

Philosophy  Humanities and Fine Arts
Political Science  Social Sciences
Psychology  Social Sciences
Sociology  Social Sciences
Women’s Studies  Social Sciences
   
College of Sciences  
All Majors  Life-Physical Sciences & Analytical Thinking
   
Greenspun College of Urban Affairs  
Communication Studies  Humanities and Fine Arts
Criminal Justice  Social Sciences
Environmental Studies  Consult with Advisor
Human Services Counseling Social Sciences
Journalism and Media Studies  Humanities and Fine Arts
Public Administration  Social Sciences
Social Work  Consult with Advisor

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